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crankedup

Original Poster:

10,948 posts

130 months

[news] 
Tuesday 16th June 2009 quote quote all
Just as a matter of curiosty, anyone here owned/driven car fitted with these type of engine? Care to share thoughts.

DickyC

17,161 posts

85 months

[news] 
Tuesday 16th June 2009 quote quote all
This isn't what you want exactly, but...

In 1978-80 I worked with a Canadian - who came over during the war and stayed - who claimed to have owned Queen Mary's sleeve valve Daimler and lived in a council house.

Apart from his description of its size and the problems associated with manoevering it in and out of the front garden every day, the only thing I can remember him saying about it was how quiet it was.

Jack "Fearless" Fairman started his career as a driver and test driver for several racing teams on the strength of test driving during his apprenticeship in Coventry. The truth was he drove sedately around town in the same Queen Mary sleeve valve Daimler.

RW774

1,042 posts

110 months

[news] 
Wednesday 17th June 2009 quote quote all
My Father started his career as a Diamler apprentice and spent alot of time on sleeve vales and pre select gearboxes.I remember the funeral cars being repaired in the garage next to the house.Not sure but I think the yanks bought the design and used the last of the Diamler S/V engine design in their Pirce Arrow.They were exceptionally quiet but very thirsty.I seem to remember Pistons were very weak with short split skirts and 5 rings.The material the sleeves were made from was impossible to repair. This technology has all but vanished including the specialists who repaired them. There is a collection of Royal Diamlers at Sandringham and I beleive the car you mention is there
The WW2 Hawker Typhoon / tempest used a sleeve valve H 24 I think ,manuafactured by Napier. The engine is at Duxford, cross sectioned.

williamp

12,580 posts

160 months

[news] 
Wednesday 17th June 2009 quote quote all
there is also a cross sectionned aero engine at Brooklands. Its looks impossibly complex, and rather wonderful.

Elderly

1,927 posts

125 months

[news] 
Wednesday 17th June 2009 quote quote all
My grandfather had a Willys Knight and that had a Sleeve-Valve engine.
Before my time - so that hardly helps you!!!!
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crankedup

Original Poster:

10,948 posts

130 months

[news] 
Wednesday 17th June 2009 quote quote all
Thanks for comments, I had read somewhere that these engines, and I am interested in the Knight sleeve valve, were rather smokey prone to using lots of engine oil. (can't be worse than my little 7 tho hehe

Cobalt Blue

67 posts

83 months

[news] 
Wednesday 1st July 2009 quote quote all
Although not car engines, the Bristol Hercules and Centaurus auero engines should give you an indication of the potential of sleeve-valve technology (60 years ago). The last versions were putting out over 3,000 hp, albiet from 55.6 litres capacity.

Look for a copy of "Major Piston Engines of World War 11 by Victor Bingham, Airlife Publishing. Plenty of technical details and drawings of sleeve-valve engines, including how Bristol were asked to supply sleeves for the Napier Sabre engine, when Napier were unable to get their own sleeves round enough.

My only 'experience' with a sleeve-valve Daimler was when riding in a Bedford J type breakdown truck in my first job after leaving school. We often drove past a large, upright Daimler limo (D24??) and the Governor's response to my stated intention to own one was "it would cost you your week's wages to start it up" At £3.10s per week, he was probably right!





crankedup

Original Poster:

10,948 posts

130 months

[news] 
Thursday 2nd July 2009 quote quote all
Thanks for link Cobalt.
Coincidence an early Daimler showed up at a local Wings and Wheels show. Mid twenties and had the original 5.5 lt sleeve valve engine. Speaking to the owner I gleaned no end of valuble info from him. One of the factors of ownership is that no spare parts are available for the engine, so its all down to the machine shop to have bits made, expensive. On starting it up it made a R.R. engine of same period seem a little noisey!

EddyP

325 posts

107 months

[news] 
Friday 3rd July 2009 quote quote all
My father rebuilt a daimler 16-20 to concours standard quite a long time ago, and as part of the restoration he had to rebuild the sleeve valve engine, it had got a cracked sleeve, which he managed to repair. From what I remember it was a beautifully smooth and quiet engine, but the lubrication system was critical, I think there was a control on the dash for the something to do with the lube system.
Ive got a lot of photos of the engine in bits and a few daimler articles/drawings/manuals on the engine.

williamp

12,580 posts

160 months

[news] 
Friday 3rd July 2009 quote quote all
EddyP said:
Ive got a lot of photos of the engine in bits and a few daimler articles/drawings/manuals on the engine.
If you can post the photos on here, then yes please!

Something that technical would be really interesting to me- and I'm sure a great many others


akhilesh agarwal

2 posts

31 months

[news] 
Monday 2nd April 2012 quote quote all
I am a retired mechanical engineer living in India, interested in Vintage cars/ engine reconditioning. I own the following-
a] Fiat Topolino A Side Valve, 1949
b] Fiat Topolino C Over Head Valve,1951
c] Fiat 1100,1956
d] Standard Super 10, 1957
e] Lambretta autocycle, 1960
f] Lohmann Compession ignition cycle motor,1951
g] Elgin outboard motor,3,5hp,1947
h] Elgin outboard motor,5,5hp,1949
i] Johnson outboard motors, HD25[2,5hp 1947], TD20[5hp 1949] amd QD12[1951 10hp]
All the above have been restored by me and are in good running condition. I am especially proud of the Lohman Compression ignition cyclemotor, which is rare and a unique design, with variable compression. I obtained it from Holland and restored it myself to fine running condition.

I also have an interest in flying, having obtained a Glider Pilot's Licence and a Private Pilot's Licence in my student days. Now I fly radio controlled model aircraft and helicopters. I am currently flying an electric powered twin engine Dakota DC3.

I have a special interest in Sleeve Valve Engines and cars such as Daimler, Willys Knight, Stearns Knight, Minerva, and Voisin which used Sleeve Valve Engines. I am especially interested in the Daimler Sleeve Valve engine, a V12 called Double Six, used in Daimler cars in 1928, and would like to know more details. I recently found a gentleman in Australia who restored a Stearns Knight 8 cylinder engine after making two replacement sleeves.

I have read with interest many posts in 2006 in AACA, and everything I could find on the net about Sleeve Valve Engines. I would like to get in touch with people who own or have hands on experience with reconditioning Sleeve Valve Engines. I have also received some replies to my posts in AACA. I am also looking for a Sleeve Valve engine such as Willys Knight to restore as a project and would appreciate if you refer me to someone who is selling one. Sleeve Valve engines are very hard to find here in India.

My son lives in Atlanta, GA and we visit him once every year for a month. I look forward to the privilege of hearing from you.

Akhilesh Agarwal

A9XXC

617 posts

36 months

[news] 
Friday 6th April 2012 quote quote all
A friend of mine worked for a private motor collection for many years and the collection had several sleeve valve Daimlers.
He rebuilt all of these engines over the years and several others, for owners who had seen his work, especially as there are very very few engineers who can do it.
They are very difficult to make, restore and get running properly!
However they do provide an extremely smooth and quiet motoring, if a little thirsty and smoky.

akhilesh agarwal

2 posts

31 months

[news] 
Sunday 29th April 2012 quote quote all
Dear Mike,
Thanks for your post. I understand that sleeve valve engines are difficult to work on, that is why I'm interested in them ! I would like to get in touch with your friend who has worked on them and would be grateful if you refer me to him, or let me know his email id. I live in India where sleeve valves are hard to find. I've seen a few Daimlers and Minervas in the Blackhawk collection in San Francisco, USA. My id is akhileshagarwal2000@yahoo.com
Regards
Akhilesh

peteryoung

33 posts

50 months

[news] 
Sunday 29th April 2012 quote quote all
Hi Cranked up.

Suggest you post something up on the forum at www.dlcentre.com where theres an abundance of knowledge on matters Daimler.


A9XXC

617 posts

36 months

[news] 
Sunday 29th April 2012 quote quote all
Unfortunately I haven't seen my friend for 4-5 years and he doesn't do modern technology! Anything made after 1930 is considered modern. He was due to retire an couple of years ago and lives on a canal boat. His intention was to travel the length and breath of the canal system when he retired, so he could be anywhere!
I will try a couple of people who may have more details, as I know he was considering getting a mobile phone to take on his travels.
Mike

roscobbc

817 posts

129 months

[news] 
Sunday 29th April 2012 quote quote all
No one has indicated the likely weight of a sleeve valve engine - I'm going to guess it must be quite significant - on a technical note, do the cylinder sleeves run direct in the engine block? - or are the sleeves supported on some form of bearing surface - friction on a 'cold' engine must be high and I'd guess that oil viscosity is important?

T0nup

637 posts

87 months

[news] 
Sunday 29th April 2012 quote quote all
Very interesting thread... Will have to do some reading on this as never knew such a system existed until reading it here.

tbid

48 posts

36 months

[news] 
Sunday 29th April 2012 quote quote all
I've driven a 9.7 Litre straight 6 sleeve valve engine hehe

roscobbc

817 posts

129 months

[news] 
Sunday 29th April 2012 quote quote all
I know as much as the cylinder sleeve rotates to 'open' exhaust & inlet ports, I guess rather like a 'sophisticated' and mechanised two stroke engine?

crankedup

Original Poster:

10,948 posts

130 months

[news] 
Tuesday 1st May 2012 quote quote all
A well looked after sleeve engine is an engine to behold, never owned one unfortunately. I also understand that to hear the engine running is quite rare, quieter than a R.R.
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