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happychap

329 posts

34 months

[news] 
Thursday 26th April 2012 quote quote all
You mentioned that he had fallen out with his best and only friend, try to talk to him about htis and how he feels, or how this has affected him. I would imagine that loosing his friend for what ever reason, will have a significant impact on him. This loss might be the first experience of loosing some one importent in his life. Hope this helps.

Migsy

527 posts

123 months

[news] 
Thursday 26th April 2012 quote quote all
I'm a PH Mum with an 11 year old with Autism (High Functioning).

Alot does depend on the school and class teacher - some of the things we did (and had to push hard) to get them onboard and to understand him as an individual:

- regular meetings with plans of how to manage or avoid the known areas that would cause issues/outbursts
- buying books, reading, highlighting key parts and then giving them to his class teacher (there are some fantastic Aspie books about now)
- teaching him other outcomes to situations, so he had options rather than the one route his brain was telling him - this has had a very positive impact. We had help from a Family Support Adviser who would visit fortnightly with story boards, games and all sorts to help our son, school and the family work together.

His classmate at the time (6-9 yrs old) had ADHD and was given a brightly coloured carpet mat/spot which seemed to help him alot in the classroom.

None of the above maybe helpful to you as I appreciate every child on these spectrums can be wildly different, but please know you're not alone in the challenges they bring and how special they are.

jimnicebutdim

Original Poster:

374 posts

41 months

[news] 
Thursday 26th April 2012 quote quote all
Migsy said:
I'm a PH Mum with an 11 year old with Autism (High Functioning).

Alot does depend on the school and class teacher - some of the things we did (and had to push hard) to get them onboard and to understand him as an individual:

- regular meetings with plans of how to manage or avoid the known areas that would cause issues/outbursts
- buying books, reading, highlighting key parts and then giving them to his class teacher (there are some fantastic Aspie books about now)
- teaching him other outcomes to situations, so he had options rather than the one route his brain was telling him - this has had a very positive impact. We had help from a Family Support Adviser who would visit fortnightly with story boards, games and all sorts to help our son, school and the family work together.

His classmate at the time (6-9 yrs old) had ADHD and was given a brightly coloured carpet mat/spot which seemed to help him alot in the classroom.

None of the above maybe helpful to you as I appreciate every child on these spectrums can be wildly different, but please know you're not alone in the challenges they bring and how special they are.
What sort of books? Could you give me some titles?

tali1

4,715 posts

87 months

[news] 
Thursday 26th April 2012 quote quote all
My 17 yr old son has autism -he is not independant and has never gone anywhere on his own - even to corner shop few yards away.However, behavourially he is no problem at all- he is Lexus quiet - so that respect i am rather fortunate

ApexJimi

9,858 posts

129 months

[news] 
Thursday 26th April 2012 quote quote all
tali1 said:
he is Lexus quiet
Forgive me, but....

Only on PH hehe

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tali1

4,715 posts

87 months

[news] 
Friday 27th April 2012 quote quote all
ApexJimi said:
tali1 said:
he is Lexus quiet
Forgive me, but....

Only on PH hehe

One of the V8 models to be precise - he costs quite a bit to run wink

Migsy

527 posts

123 months

[news] 
Friday 27th April 2012 quote quote all
jimnicebutdim said:
What sort of books? Could you give me some titles?
The Consultant recommended these for us (this was in 2009):

- All Cats Have Aspergers
- Can I tell you About Aspergers (this is great for sitting down with the child to help them recognise their differences to their peer group, also for family members)
- 1001 Great Ideas for Teaching and Raising Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (this is the one we went through, highlighted and then gave to the school)

Here's a link with lots of books on (including the 3 above) - finding ones that directly relate to your child takes a bit of research and I'm now looking at the teenage books as puberty and SATS and some life changes (his Dad emigrating) are going to need some new strategies.

http://www.goodreads.com/shelf/show/aspergers


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