Login | Register
SearchMy Stuff
My ProfileMy PreferencesMy Mates RSS Feed
1 2
4 5 ... 13 14
Reply to Topic
Author Discussion

grumpy52

1,072 posts

51 months

[news] 
Tuesday 13th March 2012 quote quote all
most people drive the best on the test then its down hill from then.How many have any form of further instruction or testing.You are allowed to go from never going above 40mph in most cases to driving on motorways etc,doing lots of things that are not covered when we learn to drive. Its not just the older driver a lot of new learners are doing so because they feel they have to rather than want to drive,many have no interest in cars it's just a way to get about, as with most things in life if you have little or no interest in the subject you tend not to be very good at it .

Digga

13,425 posts

168 months

[news] 
Tuesday 13th March 2012 quote quote all
TBH even if it was a compulsory eye test above a certain age it would be a start. The old man went for his bi-annual eye test earlier this year and was prescribed a new pair of driving glasses. Thank god. His line accuracy, especially in por light conditions had - to my observation - declined a fair bit in the preceding months, but he'd not noticed, I guess because the change was gradual.

Anyone who thinks old people can't drive full stop has never had the priveledge of seeing, first hand, Stirling Moss drift his Jag into Madgwick one-handed, with his other hand nonchalantly shielding his eyes from the setting sun, lap after lap.

Biker's Nemesis

25,893 posts

93 months

[news] 
Tuesday 13th March 2012 quote quote all
doogz said:
I think the majority of people here supporting this idea, aren't doing so because they like the idea creating non-jobs, nor is it because they're jealous of old people having to pay less insurance.

It's because they cause accidents that shouldn't happen, due to various factors, poor vision, hearing, spacial awareness, lack of concentration, confusion, etc.

It's quite simple.
And younger drivers cause more severe accidents due to being bull headed and driving beyond their abilitity.

PaulMoor

1,541 posts

48 months

[news] 
Tuesday 13th March 2012 quote quote all
julian64 said:
Soo..... we are on a website for young enthusiastic drivers who think the elderly should have routine manditory testing.

This is despite the fact that insurance quotes for the elderly are much lower than almost any other age group.
Actualy car insurance goes up from the age of 59.

Biker's Nemesis said:
And younger drivers cause more severe accidents due to being bull headed and driving beyond their abilitity.
"Statistics from the Association of British Insurers (ABI) show that older drivers have more accidents per mile than younger drivers and accidents caused by this age group are more likely to cause injury to others."

www.policyexpert.co.uk/know-how/car/older-drivers/

Insurance companys have a strange habit of talking about "older drivers" as safer, whilst talking about the over 50's, as if 50 is old.

Edited by PaulMoor on Tuesday 13th March 13:09

Gadgeroonie

5,314 posts

121 months

[news] 
Tuesday 13th March 2012 quote quote all
we had a family friend who was diagnosed with alzheimers, he was asked to stop driving by his doctor but could not remember and kept taking the car for a drive

in the end we had to remove all the fuses from his car so the engine would not start
Advertisement

otolith

25,382 posts

89 months

[news] 
Tuesday 13th March 2012 quote quote all
robinessex said:
The most dangerous nut in a car is the one driving it. We have to have our cars MOT every year for safety reasons, yet not the driver !! Considering that 99% of drivers can't drive correctly (BSM qualified driving instructor by the way), It's about time ALL drivers were tested every 5yrs, and to really stir things up, graduated licenses which relate your experience and competence to the power of the car you drive. PS. 64 years old, and I can see where I'm going, it's all those bloody vegatable drivers that get in my way that's the problem!!
The trouble is that drivers are most likely to cause an accident shortly after you have finished training them and they have passed their test and been rubber stamped by the DSA as fit to drive. The risk they pose will then fall for the next forty or fifty years before it begins to climb again.

I don't see the point in telling a 45 year old driver that he is a danger on the roads because he doesn't drive like a teenager, when the objective evidence of the accident stats is that while he may not be shuffling the wheel in the approved manner, he is at very much lower risk of causing an accident.

I also don't see that proving that one can concentrate and behave for half an hour is any evidence that one will continue to do so on a daily basis. I can see that a test which picks up on the frailties of age is eventually a good thing, but repeatedly retesting competent drivers? Waste of time and money.

ALY77

520 posts

95 months

[news] 
Tuesday 13th March 2012 quote quote all
In a world where my then 92 year old grandfather (now 94!) can retain his licence to drive when he has poor eyesight, poor hearing and poor mobility to the point where he can knock both wing mirrors off his car and not know what he's used to knock them off, something needs doing.

We ended up taking his car off him after the second mirror incident within a matter of months as he no idea if it was a cyclist or a car he'd hit. Turned out it was a skip at the side of the road!

I say put everyone through a basic psychological and physical examination every 5 years from 65 to see that they are capable of reacting to situations and operating a vehicle, with allowances made for the disabled driving adapted cars of course.

crofty1984

10,355 posts

89 months

[news] 
Tuesday 13th March 2012 quote quote all
I think it's an excellent idea. If someone is 70 and passed their test at 17, it's been over 50 years since they had any instruction, and the roads have changed.

I'm not for an automatic ban, but something like a practical version of the "speed awareness" course I, er I mean my friend, went on would be a good refresher.
For all ages.

doogz

22,979 posts

72 months

[news] 
Tuesday 13th March 2012 quote quote all
Biker's Nemesis said:
doogz said:
I think the majority of people here supporting this idea, aren't doing so because they like the idea creating non-jobs, nor is it because they're jealous of old people having to pay less insurance.

It's because they cause accidents that shouldn't happen, due to various factors, poor vision, hearing, spacial awareness, lack of concentration, confusion, etc.

It's quite simple.
And younger drivers cause more severe accidents due to being bull headed and driving beyond their abilitity.
Absolutely. However, re-tests are unlikely to be as effective there. Young drivers have recently passed their test. They know what they should be doing, they're just more likely to ignore it.

Whereas old people may be very set in their ways, not knowing they're not really doing it properly.

I'm all for compulsory re-tests for everyone, in all age groups, i think it would remove a lot of numpties from the roads. I was just replying to a post as to why i think it's a good reason for the older generation, specifically.

PaulMoor

1,541 posts

48 months

[news] 
Tuesday 13th March 2012 quote quote all
The problem, of course, with re-testing is what do you do about the people who fail for a minor point (e.g. not being able to park very well, as with many people) or some such which is not actualy a danger? Tell them they can no longer drive? What if they then can't work?

lyonspride

702 posts

40 months

[news] 
Tuesday 13th March 2012 quote quote all
Big_Dog said:
Its not age thats the real problem its the inability to recognise the problems of age. So the above would help to trap that.
It's called arrogance and it goes hand in hand with ignorance.

You can't argue with old, dangerous drivers.... They're always right, they always come out with "it's not a race" or "it's a limit, not a target" AND if they start to realise they are wrong, then they play the senile card by saying "oh, I don't remember". But they are NEVER wrong...... furious

Rev Limit

197 posts

39 months

[news] 
Tuesday 13th March 2012 quote quote all
I live in an area with a high population of elderly folk and the amount of times ive had to perform an emergency stop because some old dear has pulled out of a road without looking or been stuck behind one doing 20 in a 40 is unreal!

I think there should be compulsory retests once you reach 65!

doogz

22,979 posts

72 months

[news] 
Tuesday 13th March 2012 quote quote all
PaulMoor said:
The problem, of course, with re-testing is what do you do about the people who fail for a minor point (e.g. not being able to park very well, as with many people) or some such which is not actualy a danger? Tell them they can no longer drive? What if they then can't work?
If they drive for a living, and have such bad spacial awareness that they can't park, they shouldn't have that job.

If their job is not driving, not having a licence doesn't mean they can't work.

If they fail though, they should be able to take a re-test. Not an infinite number of them, there should come a time where someone says "enough is enough, you're off the roads" although i wouldn't like to decide what that figure might be.

aka_kerrly

7,261 posts

95 months

[news] 
Tuesday 13th March 2012 quote quote all
The theory is sound but the logistics of it is beyond what can be managed right now.

There are already too many youngsters who want to drive but the test centres are booked up for months or there aren't enough instructors so how could the system possibly support mandatory retesting of people who already hold licences as well?

I am all for the idea that come 65 you should have to reapply for your licence and not self certify but get a doctors certificate to say that your eyesight and reactions/hand eye coordination etc are up to scratch as this wouldn't be too much of a administrative burden and won't stop people who are barely able to see past their own arm ticking a box to say they are still capable of driving.


V8 FOU

1,334 posts

32 months

[news] 
Tuesday 13th March 2012 quote quote all
I'm not eligable for my buss pass yet - but I passed my test 40 years ago. I would be very happy to take a test.
How about for starters, an eye test every 3-5 years and take the theory test at the same time? Start with everyone over 70 and slowly work your way down until everyone has to.
The main problem with this is it isn't politically expedient. Lots of older drivers = lots of votes = worried politicians.
My dad who is 90, recently bought a Skoda superb (anything but.....) and complained how he couldn't see the speedo etc. Turns out he has a cataract!! Very scary.

annodomini2

5,072 posts

136 months

[news] 
Tuesday 13th March 2012 quote quote all
doogz said:
TheOrangePeril said:
IMO there should be mandatory refresher courses for all ages, not just OAPs! Considering the pathetic ease with which you can get a license in the UK, there should really be a re-test or refresher every ten years, increasing to a more concise period for older drivers. A lot of bad habits form in the first ten-twenty years of driving which are then further exacerbated by ageing issues in the last ten-twenty years.

Generally a good idea, but we shouldn't discount the huge numbers of younger bad drivers that could also benefit from refreshers in this vein.
I agree with this.

A guy in work the other day was nipping out for lunch, and asked if i wanted to come.

We got in his auto 9-3, and he drove the whole way with one hand at 12 o'clock, the other sat on top of the gear stick, for no apparent reason, and never checked a single mirror once. I don't understand how people drive like this every day, and don't have regular accidents.
I also agree with this, it's not just old people, but generally incompetent and ignorant drivers.

Re-education is necessary.

SonnyM

3,058 posts

78 months

[news] 
Tuesday 13th March 2012 quote quote all
The worst drivers I have ever seen are those in local towns with no experience of driving out of that town or in a city which forces them to learn about the rules of the road. These are people who drive at 40+ in 30 zones, don't stop or look at roundabouts, cut corners like they don't exist, and cause accidents some fatal. I have seen this first hand and spoken with people I know who fit this category.

They should make the driving test significantly harder and much more comprehensive for people who are getting their license for the first time. First get the test right, then apply it to those of an older age.

gmh23

249 posts

65 months

[news] 
Tuesday 13th March 2012 quote quote all
crofty1984 said:
I think it's an excellent idea. If someone is 70 and passed their test at 17, it's been over 50 years since they had any instruction, and the roads have changed.
my thoughts exactly.

otolith

25,382 posts

89 months

[news] 
Tuesday 13th March 2012 quote quote all
A retesting framework would be a godsend for the Greens if they ever got any power in a coalition, though. They could add eco-driving to the test and set the pass requirements high enough to get loads of people off the roads and onto the bus.

TOENHEEL

4,471 posts

112 months

[news] 
Tuesday 13th March 2012 quote quote all
There's an old fella in my street who shouldn't be allowed near a road, he had a rover 25 for years which looks like its gone pop (was knocking like hell last time i saw it) I admit being pretty pleased about it and didn't expect him to replace it but I've just seen him in a Kia.. He's a danger to everyone including pedestrians, can't judge gaps and has very little control over the car. Seems awful but he should be reported really before hurting himself or other people.


ETA- A lot of elderly people blame old age for their deteoreation in driving standards but to be honest a few I know have always been shocking drivers!
1 2
4 5 ... 13 14
Reply to Topic