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rewc

Original Poster:

1,985 posts

121 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
A new cycle lane that dominates a bridge in Hertfordshire is causing confusion for pedestrians who are staying on the narrow edges.

Hertfordshire County Council said: "The lines in place on the Fairlands Way path have been installed in accordance with the scheme design and to current codes and standards.

"The lines are not intended to form pedestrian lanes, nor pedestrian exclusion zones. They are guidance for cyclists.

"Pedestrians are free to walk wherever they like. The signing provided at the bridge indicates this to bridge users."

So what is it all about and what rights does it give cyclists or pedestrians?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-beds-bucks-he...

Fartomatic5000

436 posts

43 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
IF there is a marked cycle path (with solid line segregating it from pedestrian bit) on the pavement AND IF a cyclist is using the pavement then they must stay within the cycle path markings (not allowed into the pedestrian bit).
There is no requirement for pedestrians to stay out of such a cycle path, so there is no confusion here, cyclists and peds can use it.

MrTrilby

601 posts

170 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
rewc said:
"The lines are not intended to form pedestrian lanes, nor pedestrian exclusion zones. They are guidance for cyclists.
Proof, if ever there was any doubt, that cycle lanes are designed by people who have never been near a bicycle in their life. Exactly what guidance did they think the cyclists need? Don't cycle into or over the handrail?

streaky

19,311 posts

137 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
Fartomatic5000 said:
IF there is a marked cycle path (with solid line segregating it from pedestrian bit) on the pavement AND IF a cyclist is using the pavement then they must stay within the cycle path markings (not allowed into the pedestrian bit).
There is no requirement for pedestrians to stay out of such a cycle path, so there is no confusion here, cyclists and peds can use it.
Sad that some cyclists think differently ... as other threads here have illustrated.

Streaky

MiseryStreak

1,446 posts

95 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
People just love to follow lines...


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cptsideways

10,863 posts

140 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
Numptyness of the highest order 10/10 on that one

Fozziebear

1,055 posts

28 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
Would have been easier to split the bridge in half, but that would mean thinking, muppets

7mike

2,484 posts

81 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
Fozziebear said:
Would have been easier to split the bridge in half, but that would mean thinking, muppets
Yes, but wouldn't everyone fall in the river? getmecoat

Fozziebear

1,055 posts

28 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
7mike said:
Fozziebear said:
Would have been easier to split the bridge in half, but that would mean thinking, muppets
Yes, but wouldn't everyone fall in the river? getmecoat
Class! Didn't think of that, maybe I have a career in town planning?

Toltec

2,503 posts

111 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
Do the lines mean?

Do not cross with your wheels or your handle bars will hit the railings you muppet.

Do not cross any part of the plane vertically projected above the line with any part of the cycle, your person, luggage, accessories or other items being conveyed on said cycle. Please read leaflet CP875a for further information; available from council offices in 585 languages, also available in Braille and 17 audio formats in 583 languages* for differently sighted cyclists who require visual acuity aids.

* Apologies, we could not find anyone that could still pronounce ancient Egyptian, we are currently trying to persuade an Amazonian villager to fly in to record in their dialect of Pano and hopefully we will therefore shortly raise the number of languages to 584.




simoid

13,314 posts

46 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
Somebody's painted that for a laugh and nobody is willing to admit it.

Tunku

7,090 posts

116 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
I always thought pedestrians took precedence over everyone else unless there are special circumstances like motorways.
Those lines are simply to prevent the thick cyclists colliding with the sides of the bridge.

Nigel Worc's

7,239 posts

76 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
Tunku said:
I always thought pedestrians took precedence over everyone else unless there are special circumstances like motorways.
Those lines are simply to prevent the thick cyclists colliding with the sides of the bridge.
PMSL, the cyclists will have priority over the bridge, come on man keep up, cyclists have priority over everything, they are the new invention.

That scheme is proof, if proof was ever needed, that nobody wants to share space with cyclists.

Rostfritt

1,120 posts

39 months

[news] 
Wednesday 10th October 2012 quote quote all
Cycle lanes seem designed to confuse. There are some near me that are a diagram of a bicycle every 50m or so. What is that meant to state? Cyclist are allowed to use that road no more or less than any other road as are cars, there is no reserved area. In town things get a bit more confusing, in a pedestrian area there is the odd paving slab with a small bike diagram on it, these seem to lead to a bridge with no marking for bikes. I treat these pedestrianised bits like I shouldn't really ride there, ie really slow and trying to not get in the way of pedestrians, as they may not have noticed the signs.

I haven't actually had any militant pedestrians there but I do on another section where a pavement has signs showing it as shared use, due to the road next to it being cobbled and possibly private land.

Councils seem determined to baffle cyclists and anyone who might have to share road space with them.

streaky

19,311 posts

137 months

[news] 
Wednesday 10th October 2012 quote quote all
"The council said the new lines met 'current codes and standards'."

They probably say: "No narrower than ... "

Streaky

GreatGranny

4,916 posts

114 months

[news] 
Wednesday 10th October 2012 quote quote all
Its a shared footway/cycleway.
The road marking (Ref. 1057 TSRGD 2002) can indicate either a cycle lane, track or ROUTE.

There will be signs at either end and repeaters along the route to indicate a shared route.

The solid markings (Ref. 1049) indicate the boundary of the route.

Maybe it would have been less confusing if the marking wasn't on the bridge. I would have placed them either end possibly.

However you have to question the pedestrians who think that the area between the solid line and the handrail is wide enough for a footway.

C.A.R.

2,050 posts

76 months

[news] 
Wednesday 10th October 2012 quote quote all
Proof that our town is full of idiots.

streaky

19,311 posts

137 months

[news] 
Wednesday 10th October 2012 quote quote all
GreatGranny said:
Its a shared footway/cycleway.
The road marking (Ref. 1057 TSRGD 2002) can indicate either a cycle lane, track or ROUTE.

There will be signs at either end and repeaters along the route to indicate a shared route.

The solid markings (Ref. 1049) indicate the boundary of the route.

Maybe it would have been less confusing if the marking wasn't on the bridge. I would have placed them either end possibly.

However you have to question the pedestrians who think that the area between the solid line and the handrail is wide enough for a footway.
People are becoming frightened of putting a foot even slightly wrong and breaking some petty law they've never heard of and can't understand why enacted.

Besides which, non-drivers don't usually know the HC, so won't understand the signs. I've seen marked lanes on the foot way with a facsimile bicycle, stick-person pushing buggy, and stick-person walking painted markings, individually and in combination. How is your average Jo supposed to understand with this confusion around?

Streaky

Edited by streaky on Wednesday 10th October 13:12

simoid

13,314 posts

46 months

[news] 
Wednesday 10th October 2012 quote quote all
Try walking along the white line of the paths through the Meadows in Edinburgh, you'll soon find out why people are reluctant to walk inside an area marked with a bicycle.
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