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13th

Original Poster:

3,165 posts

100 months

[news] 
Friday 5th October 2012 quote quote all
Hi all,

Where do I stand on blocking in a member of the publics car on private land?

The land in question is for a commercial business but one particular person is using the car park to leave their car to gain free parking, being a busy area this is causing customers being unable to park.

Numerous requests have been left on the car window not to use the car park all of which have been ignored.

Before ending up on the wrong side of the law where would I stand on blocking the car in and refusing to move?

Sadly clamping, security access are not an option. Although looking into large very sticky warning notices are been looked in to as this one person is the thin end of the wedge.

Any advice?


DaveH23

1,290 posts

57 months

[news] 
Friday 5th October 2012 quote quote all

Zeeky

2,519 posts

99 months

[news] 
Friday 5th October 2012 quote quote all
Blocking him in is immobilising his vehicle which is unlawful.

Sir Bagalot

3,123 posts

68 months

[news] 
Friday 5th October 2012 quote quote all
Block him in but leave a contact number visible on the dashboard of the car blocking them in.

He comes back, calls number and person answers saying yeah ok, give me a min and I'll move it. Go back 15 mins later and move it. He'll soon get the message.

Zeeky

2,519 posts

99 months

[news] 
Friday 5th October 2012 quote quote all

54 Offence of immobilising etc. vehicles

(1)A person commits an offence who, without lawful authority—

(a)immobilises a motor vehicle by the attachment to the vehicle, or a part of it, of an immobilising device, or

(b)moves, or restricts the movement of, such a vehicle by any means,

intending to prevent or inhibit the removal of the vehicle by a person otherwise entitled to remove it.

Advertisement

Breadvan72

19,759 posts

50 months

[news] 
Friday 5th October 2012 quote quote all
Try large stickers which are removable but with difficulty, but which do not render the car un driveable. If all else fails, you will have to obtain an injunction against the driver. If you can't find out who he or she is, you might obtain a Person unknown order to stick to the car, but this process would of course be costly. Maybe have a solicitor's letter printed onto a sticky sticker.

13th

Original Poster:

3,165 posts

100 months

[news] 
Friday 5th October 2012 quote quote all
Thanks for all the replies.

Very disappointed that despite repeated warnings we really are helpless to stop this nasty agressive man, who seems to find genuine pleasure in squaring up to a woman, from parking on private land.

So stickers it will have to be; do we have to give advanced warning? or just sticker him up??

Breadvan72

19,759 posts

50 months

[news] 
Friday 5th October 2012 quote quote all
Just sticker him up, big stylee. Take care to inflict no damage on the car. If you really want to get him, go the injunction route, but the up front costs will be a fair few quid (potentially recoverable in part against the tosser). A firm letter from solicitors may serve as a wakey uppy smelly coffee moment for Mr tt.

R0G

4,069 posts

42 months

[news] 
Friday 5th October 2012 quote quote all
Could trespass laws be used in this case?

Zeeky

2,519 posts

99 months

[news] 
Friday 5th October 2012 quote quote all
You could use the services of a private parking company although if it is just one vehicle causing the problem it may not be viable for them. Alternatively you could introduce a charge for parking but you would need to do it correctly for it to be effective.

k99

282 posts

55 months

[news] 
Friday 5th October 2012 quote quote all
Sir Bagalot said:
Block him in but leave a contact number visible on the dashboard of the car blocking them in.

He comes back, calls number and person answers saying yeah ok, give me a min and I'll move it. Go back 15 mins later and move it. He'll soon get the message.
+1

Breadvan72

19,759 posts

50 months

[news] 
Friday 5th October 2012 quote quote all
R0G said:
Could trespass laws be used in this case?
Of course, but we are talking about practical remedies. The fact of trespass is obvious. The question is, how to stop it?

R11ysf

1,520 posts

69 months

[news] 
Friday 5th October 2012 quote quote all
Could you not install a bollard and then when he parks there again erect the bollard. You could claim that as it is a parking space for customers/employees only you thought he was one and was protecting his car.

Essentially you just want to be enough of a pain in the ass that it's more hassle for him to park there than not. The odd blocking in, lots of stickers etc etc will eventually get on his nerves enough.

R0G

4,069 posts

42 months

[news] 
Friday 5th October 2012 quote quote all
Breadvan72 said:
R0G said:
Could trespass laws be used in this case?
Of course, but we are talking about practical remedies. The fact of trespass is obvious. The question is, how to stop it?
Trespass means the police can be involved - yes?

Breadvan72

19,759 posts

50 months

[news] 
Friday 5th October 2012 quote quote all
No it does not. Where do people acquire such notions?

R0G

4,069 posts

42 months

[news] 
Friday 5th October 2012 quote quote all
Report an abandoned car to the law ?

chr15b

3,219 posts

77 months

[news] 
Friday 5th October 2012 quote quote all
id just park behind him, it'll bring the matter to a head, if nothing else.

what will he do, call the police? i'm sure if you're reasonable about shifting your car upon request that it wont get taken any further.

if the parking continues, just take a little longer each time to shift

R0G

4,069 posts

42 months

[news] 
Friday 5th October 2012 quote quote all
<tongue in cheek mode>

Find local hoody with a screwdriver and slip them a fiver

Breadvan72

19,759 posts

50 months

[news] 
Friday 5th October 2012 quote quote all
R0G said:
Report an abandoned car to the law ?
Wasting police time.

mikeveal

1,775 posts

137 months

[news] 
Friday 5th October 2012 quote quote all
R0G said:
Breadvan72 said:
R0G said:
Could trespass laws be used in this case?
Of course, but we are talking about practical remedies. The fact of trespass is obvious. The question is, how to stop it?
Trespass means the police can be involved - yes?
Breadvan72 said:
No it does not. Where do people acquire such notions?
Tresspass is a civil, not a criminal matter. That means the police aren't interested. Going down the tresspass route would mean sueing the guy for losses / damages.
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