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buggalugs

7,289 posts

120 months

[news] 
Friday 12th October 2012 quote quote all
stuttgartmetal said:
ofcorsa said:
They are?
I love these little adjacent ruckus/skirmishes next to threads.
They're soo much fun.


lollers

Really?
You don't know what to fill a hole in the garden with?

Go-on, off with ya.

You're hardcore, and you don't even know it.


Edited by stuttgartmetal on Friday 12th October 16:26
What are you, 15?

y2blade

54,299 posts

98 months

[news] 
Friday 12th October 2012 quote quote all
julian64 said:
My wife keeps chickens in the back garden. She has eighteen of them at the moment.

Last week we had a small jack russell come in and destroy two of them. The chickens were left in bits all over the garden and she is currently nursing a third which has some dirty great holes bitten out of it, and now has fly strike.

The dog was too fast to be caught by her, and managed to scrabble through one fence and jump another to get to the birds.

If I'd been there and had an avaiable gun I'd have shot the dog.

If someone wanted to remonstrate with me I'd have told them they were responsible for the dogs death, not me.

Its simple really, you let your dog onto someone elses property, you are responsible.

I could post video, but I suggest you dog lovers might not enjoy to see what a dog does when it doesn't have an owner around to say how gentle it is.
I'd agree with you.

We had flystrike on one of our hens after she was attacked while we were out....we lost her to it.

GokTweed

3,714 posts

34 months

[news] 
Friday 12th October 2012 quote quote all
daz3210 said:
jaf01uk said:
Have to laugh, what part of "taking personal responsibility" do you struggle with?
None. If it were only so black and white (just like the cows). But, you obviously haven't walked through the fields that I am talking about judging by your ill informed comment.

One of the fields I regularly walk is downhill from the entrance I use with a brow that hides the far end of the field, has a small wooded bit at the bottom, with a stream in a severe dip. The cows tend to congregate out of sight of the entrance. The field is maybe 1/3 of a mile long. If the cows were to have calves with them, they probably would not be visible from the stile at the entrance. The field has a public footpath straight through the middle. By the time you see the cows you would be over half way into the field. How then sir should I take personal responsibility in this instance, since you seem to have a better understanding than you credit me for?
The farmer won't put cows with calves in a field that has a public footpath running through it. Also black and white cows aren't found in fields with calves as they are dairy not beef.

Nigel Worc's

Original Poster:

6,687 posts

71 months

[news] 
Friday 12th October 2012 quote quote all
GokTweed said:
The farmer won't put cows with calves in a field that has a public footpath running through it.
Panto season come early


Oooooooooooh yes they do !

daz3210

5,000 posts

123 months

[news] 
Friday 12th October 2012 quote quote all
Nigel Worc's said:
Panto season come early


Oooooooooooh yes they do !
Don't worry Nigel, if I get attacked I can sue Gok for his advice since it is obviously flawed [/tongueincheek]

I find it interesting that the other poster has yet to respond to my question though.

I also have to question, if dairy cows don't have calves, how do they breed?




Edited by daz3210 on Friday 12th October 23:43

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stuttgartmetal

6,770 posts

99 months

[news] 
Saturday 13th October 2012 quote quote all
buggalugs said:
stuttgartmetal said:
ofcorsa said:
They are?
I love these little adjacent ruckus/skirmishes next to threads.
They're soo much fun.


lollers

Really?
You don't know what to fill a hole in the garden with?

Go-on, off with ya.

You're hardcore, and you don't even know it.


Edited by stuttgartmetal on Friday 12th October 16:26
What are you, 15?
Next year.

With a name like that, what are you?


8?





Lolski

jaf01uk

1,697 posts

79 months

[news] 
Saturday 13th October 2012 quote quote all
daz3210 said:
Nigel Worc's said:
Panto season come early


Oooooooooooh yes they do !
Don't worry Nigel, if I get attacked I can sue Gok for his advice since it is obviously flawed [/tongueincheek]

I find it interesting that the other poster has yet to respond to my question though.

I also have to question, if dairy cows don't have calves, how do they breed?




Edited by daz3210 on Friday 12th October 23:43
Well Daz, apologies for actually having a life away from a computer, you make some amazing assumptions about me, if you were to check my profile you would see I live in N E Scotland where funnily enough we have some very wide open spaces with lots of farms on them? In the situation you describe with the brow can you not see how easy it would be to walk to the brow and if the cows are there simply walk back the way you came, I really worry for your safety if you're struggling with something as simple as that and understand now why you might be looking to delegate your safety to others, no further comment, it's getting petty and off topic, as the fellow Scot says, I'm out biggrin
Gary

Jasandjules

50,448 posts

112 months

[news] 
Saturday 13th October 2012 quote quote all
daz3210 said:
I also have to question, if dairy cows don't have calves, how do they breed?
Diary cows have the calf taken away minutes after birth. They then cry about it for a day or two. Horrible, horrible situation and the irony of vegans/vegetarians etc who drink milk who think this is not a cruel process. The cows only produce milk when they are calfing.


daz3210

5,000 posts

123 months

[news] 
Saturday 13th October 2012 quote quote all
jaf01uk said:
Well Daz, apologies for actually having a life away from a computer, you make some amazing assumptions about me, if you were to check my profile you would see I live in N E Scotland where funnily enough we have some very wide open spaces with lots of farms on them? In the situation you describe with the brow can you not see how easy it would be to walk to the brow and if the cows are there simply walk back the way you came, I really worry for your safety if you're struggling with something as simple as that and understand now why you might be looking to delegate your safety to others, no further comment, it's getting petty and off topic, as the fellow Scot says, I'm out biggrin
Gary
Good to see that a bloke almost 400 miles away has a better comprehension of the lie of land 400 yards from where I sit than me.

Been there and tried what he suggests, and while in theory it would work, in practice cows can move pretty sharpish!
(For the avoidance of doubt they caught up!)


Edited by daz3210 on Saturday 13th October 12:11

daz3210

5,000 posts

123 months

[news] 
Saturday 13th October 2012 quote quote all
Jasandjules said:
Diary [sic] cows have the calf taken away minutes after birth.
Never knew that


Jasandjules

50,448 posts

112 months

[news] 
Saturday 13th October 2012 quote quote all
daz3210 said:
Never knew that
Very few people do. It's an awful, awful thing and it upsets me just thinking about it. Not something diary farmers/milk producers advertise..

oldsoak

5,618 posts

85 months

[news] 
Saturday 13th October 2012 quote quote all
Jasandjules said:
Diary cows have the calf taken away minutes after birth. They then cry about it for a day or two. Horrible, horrible situation and the irony of vegans/vegetarians etc who drink milk who think this is not a cruel process. The cows only produce milk when they are calfing.
'Dear diary,
Gave birth. Don't know what sex it was as my child was whisked away from me by those bipedal monsters so they could hook me to a machine that sucks at my teats...'

Willy Nilly

4,957 posts

50 months

[news] 
Saturday 13th October 2012 quote quote all
Jasandjules said:
daz3210 said:
Never knew that
Very few people do. It's an awful, awful thing and it upsets me just thinking about it. Not something diary farmers/milk producers advertise..
The calf would be kept with its mother for a few days while she is still producing colostrum, because that cannot go in the tank. Mum will have to be milked, because she will be producing car more milk than the calf can drink.

Dairy cows are not know for their mothering instincts, they are not bred for it, they are bred to produce milk. The main reason she has a calf is so she will produce milk. Many farms will breed their own replacement heifers, so these will be kept. But if the cow has a dairy bull calf it is very often shot a birth. This is because some do gooders thought that putting live calves on a purpose built trailer and sending them to Holland was bad. But the law of unintended consequences kicked in.

Regardless of what people think, in the main farm animals are very well looked after, but they are not pets. If you think you can do better, feel free to have a go. You'll more than likely fail.

People either cannot, or will not make a connection between a farm and the food they eat. Those bouncy little lambs you see in the spring will end up as lamb chops. Calves end up as rump steak. Bare fields end up as crops. Food just doesn't magically appear on supermarket shelves.

HTH




ClaphamGT3

4,235 posts

126 months

[news] 
Saturday 13th October 2012 quote quote all
Willy Nilly said:
Jasandjules said:
daz3210 said:
Never knew that
Very few people do. It's an awful, awful thing and it upsets me just thinking about it. Not something diary farmers/milk producers advertise..
The calf would be kept with its mother for a few days while she is still producing colostrum, because that cannot go in the tank. Mum will have to be milked, because she will be producing car more milk than the calf can drink.

Dairy cows are not know for their mothering instincts, they are not bred for it, they are bred to produce milk. The main reason she has a calf is so she will produce milk. Many farms will breed their own replacement heifers, so these will be kept. But if the cow has a dairy bull calf it is very often shot a birth. This is because some do gooders thought that putting live calves on a purpose built trailer and sending them to Holland was bad. But the law of unintended consequences kicked in.

Regardless of what people think, in the main farm animals are very well looked after, but they are not pets. If you think you can do better, feel free to have a go. You'll more than likely fail.

People either cannot, or will not make a connection between a farm and the food they eat. Those bouncy little lambs you see in the spring will end up as lamb chops. Calves end up as rump steak. Bare fields end up as crops. Food just doesn't magically appear on supermarket shelves.

HTH
Excellent post.

eldar

8,244 posts

79 months

[news] 
Thursday 25th October 2012 quote quote all
Just got this in my mail from the local police...

Message sent by
Reece Watt (Police, PCSO, Copeland (W))

Cumbria police have received reports of possible sheep worrying by dogs within the Egremont area.
It was reported that 7 sheep went missing from a farm in the Briscoe mount area and were later found dead with extensive injuries to them, it is believed the injuries were possibly caused by one or more dogs. Obviously this has caused quite a financial loss to the farmer involved.
Please could you keep an eye out in your area for persons seen on your land with dogs that haven't been given your permission, and please report all suspicious incident to police on 101.

if anyone also has any information relating to the above incident please call 101 and speak to me or respond to this message.


Who me ?

5,130 posts

95 months

[news] 
Friday 26th October 2012 quote quote all
Now in all this concern over sheep being worried by dogs, and the farmers"NEEDING" compensation. Let me recount a tale from crofter country. Years ago ,a crofter let two Rams out. These formed an aliance ,and decided that dogs were on the hit list. It wasn't uncommon to find a dog being attacked by these two . What could the dog owner do -sue, or get out the gun and do unto the sheep as the farmer would do unto the dog ?

GokTweed

3,714 posts

34 months

[news] 
Friday 26th October 2012 quote quote all
[quote=Who me ?]Now in all this concern over sheep being worried by dogs, and the farmers"NEEDING" compensation. Let me recount a tale from crofter country. Years ago ,a crofter let two Rams out. These formed an aliance ,and decided that dogs were on the hit list. It wasn't uncommon to find a dog being attacked by these two . What could the dog owner do -sue, or get out the gun and do unto the sheep as the farmer would do unto the dog ?
[/quote]

Hopefully the dog owner would have seen two rams in the field and thought hmmm maybe i'll skip this one. They have bigger bks than brains and think they are hard as nails so naturally want to prove it. Think of them as the white van men of the animal world wink

s3fella

7,870 posts

70 months

[news] 
Sunday 28th October 2012 quote quote all
Interesting when I heard the owner of this dog on the radio the other day. He reckons the law states a farmer can shoot a dog worrying 'his sheep' ( after all attempts to capture it have failed it seems). Anyway, the owner reckons that the sheep that these dogs were in the vicinity of did not belong to the farmer, they were merely on his land to keep the grass down.

Not sure if this is true etc, just what was said. But is this the case, that only the sheep owner can shoot a dog worrying them?

Can't see it being the case or farm workers couldn't do so, surely?

Who me ?

5,130 posts

95 months

[news] 
Sunday 28th October 2012 quote quote all
GokTweed said:
[quote=Who me ?]Now in all this concern over sheep being worried by dogs, and the farmers"NEEDING" compensation. Let me recount a tale from crofter country. Years ago ,a crofter let two Rams out. These formed an aliance ,and decided that dogs were on the hit list. It wasn't uncommon to find a dog being attacked by these two . What could the dog owner do -sue, or get out the gun and do unto the sheep as the farmer would do unto the dog ?
Hopefully the dog owner would have seen two rams in the field and thought hmmm maybe i'll skip this one. They have bigger bks than brains and think they are hard as nails so naturally want to prove it. Think of them as the white van men of the animal world wink
This WAS not in a field. This was on the open road/ down a lane , etc. No dog was safe from these .These two wandered the village taking on all comers. Our local bank manager had a nice Rover ( think it was 2000), and polished it till you could see face in it. Unfortunately ,ram saw his face in it ,and decided he had a rival .

telecat

6,839 posts

124 months

[news] 
Monday 29th October 2012 quote quote all
Shoot this one and I doubt the owner will be forgiving.

http://www.farmingnewsdaily.co.uk/news/291012/worl...

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