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Animala

Original Poster:

476 posts

50 months

[news] 
Saturday 9th October 2010 quote quote all
Alright that would probably save me a rediculous amount of money. I know the German equivilent to a MOT test would cover it to be driven on UK roads so that's one thing taken care of. Are road fund licenses the same over there as here? or would I need to change it once I get into the UK?

What would be my best option for getting it insured while i'm driving it home through Europe? because I know we can't take our trade plates abroad. Would it be better to arrange temporary cover from here before I go to pick it up?

Roo

8,467 posts

95 months

[news] 
Monday 11th October 2010 quote quote all
You'd need temporary insurance, presumably on the chassis number.

Then MOT when you get it here to get it registered.

And don't forget, it's illegal for a UK licence holder to drive a foreign registered vehicle in the UK unless they are employed in the country in which the vehicle is registered.

Animala

Original Poster:

476 posts

50 months

[news] 
Monday 11th October 2010 quote quote all
Ok so I could buy the car from the dealership in Germany, arrange temporary insurance on it if the dealership dosn't (any recommendations for a good temp insurance provider?) and drive the car to the UK.

Once in the UK I'd need a transporter to take the car to an MOT centre and then back to mine then the prcoess we discussed before of registering it at the DVLA?

Or, once in the UK could I use trade plates after it's gotten its MOT?

Roo

8,467 posts

95 months

[news] 
Monday 11th October 2010 quote quote all
We use a transport company to shift stuff long distances as it's easier.

Trade plates will only cover you if the vehicle is part of the business.

Animala

Original Poster:

476 posts

50 months

[news] 
Monday 11th October 2010 quote quote all
Ah right, I suppose since the distance between where the car would be arriving into the country and the distance which I live from it is very far it would be better to have the car transported there rather than risk driving all the way for legal reasons.
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zxttfan

13 posts

51 months

[news] 
Sunday 24th October 2010 quote quote all
In some US states, older cars are not issued titles. In these cases, the cars are sold on a bill of sale. If you buy a car from one of these states, you have to have a bill of sale from the seller in order to get it exported to the UK.

Chipsnegg

1 posts

29 months

[news] 
Monday 30th July 2012 quote quote all
Hi.
I'm also thinking of driving a mustang across the states and shipping it home to the uk.
I'm sure I read on the Dvla website if your car is pre 1969 there isn't any import duties to be paid. Just a 5% fee.
Worth looking up.
Chris

CupraAndy

248 posts

46 months

[news] 
Wednesday 1st August 2012 quote quote all
Read this with great intent smile it is also my plan to import a GT500 to restore in the not so distant future.

Thanks Roo!!!

Roo

8,467 posts

95 months

[news] 
Wednesday 1st August 2012 quote quote all
The great thing about old cars is it's a hell of a lot easier to deal with than new cars.

CupraAndy

248 posts

46 months

[news] 
Thursday 2nd August 2012 quote quote all
haha Yup! I used to have a 68 beetle i built upto a 1641 twin webber power plant. But just built a Leon Cupra to race, hate modern electrics and all that rubbish!
Give me a 428 with Dual Holley four-barrell anyday wink

vpr

1,859 posts

126 months

[news] 
Saturday 15th September 2012 quote quote all
Over 30 yrs old its a 5% duty.

Any younger its full fat VAT at 20%
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