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Huntsman

4,445 posts

138 months

[news] 
Wednesday 9th May 2012 quote quote all
piper said:
nicanary said:
The radiator shell screams 3-litre Bentley, maybe on a short-chassis special, but the grille is very far forward. And for some reason I keep thinking Marendaz Special.

People with keener eyesight may be able to decipher the registration.
Thanks nicanary for the reply, the radiator shell just seems not quite butch enough for a Bentley! I think the reg number ends in E588, any identification would be greatly appreciated.
I wouldn't have guessed Marendaz.

My money on a Bentley 3ltr with Corsica body, there's sticking my neck out!

Reckon that's a job for prewarcar.com


Balmoral

30,069 posts

136 months

[news] 
Wednesday 9th May 2012 quote quote all
I don't think it's a Bentley, too much of it is forward of the front axle, whereas on a Vintage or Derby Special it's all well behind (and no-one was cutting up MKVI's for Specials just yet back then). The grille doesn't look quite the right shape either. It's a puzzler.

forsure

1,519 posts

156 months

[news] 
Wednesday 9th May 2012 quote quote all
^ My first thought was Lagonda, they often had the radiator well forward of the front axle.

Just guessing though.

Balmoral

30,069 posts

136 months

[news] 
Wednesday 9th May 2012 quote quote all
Now you mention it, the two pairs of lamps and pair of horns positioning is a bit Lagonda.

RichB

31,354 posts

172 months

[news] 
Wednesday 9th May 2012 quote quote all
In fact the radiator is too far forward for pretty well ever pre-war car. It's certainly not a Marendaz (I know them well, I nearly bought one a couple of years ago) and while there are certain Lagonda elements, the radiator shell and the stylised moulding linking the rad line to the doors and up to where the windscreen should be but... the proportions are all wrong for any Lagonda I know (and being an Aston chap I see quite a lot at shows). The radiator sitting right in line with the front chassis rail ends is just wrong. Oh and the exhaust hardly screams big meaty 4.5 litre engine does it? I reckon it's a bit'sa

Typical Lagonda


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52classic

1,326 posts

98 months

[news] 
Wednesday 9th May 2012 quote quote all
Some interesting comments about the relative ages of cars.

AIRC when I started driving in 1969 my 10 year old Anglia 105e was pretty much 'end of life' in most respects and only my efforts with filler and thick oil in the engine coaxed another year out of it.

Today I regard a 10 year old car at 100K as barely run in and all cars in our houshold join us at about that age. I quite happily use a 17 year old one as a daily driver. Hardly any rust on any of them. These days it seems to be the electronics, or more importantly the cost of repairing same, which is the biggest threat.

eccles

8,603 posts

110 months

[news] 
Wednesday 9th May 2012 quote quote all
Large brake drums make it look like it's a larger car, fwd position of the rad makes it look like maybe it's front wheel drive....

cjb1

1,871 posts

39 months

[news] 
Thursday 10th May 2012 quote quote all
Here, here Sir, Goosed ECU on a modern car sends the poor thing off to the scrappers, older cars with points, condensor and a distributor start giving jip it'd be off to the scrapper to get replacements! I served my time as a motor mechanic on '70's Fords and know how to diagnose a problem, my lad is a 'Technician' at a Multi-franchise dealer, needs a laptop to sort them!
52classic said:
Some interesting comments about the relative ages of cars.

AIRC when I started driving in 1969 my 10 year old Anglia 105e was pretty much 'end of life' in most respects and only my efforts with filler and thick oil in the engine coaxed another year out of it.

Today I regard a 10 year old car at 100K as barely run in and all cars in our houshold join us at about that age. I quite happily use a 17 year old one as a daily driver. Hardly any rust on any of them. These days it seems to be the electronics, or more importantly the cost of repairing same, which is the biggest threat.

cjb1

1,871 posts

39 months

[news] 
Thursday 10th May 2012 quote quote all
EEEE there we're trouble at t'mill lad, proud t'bi Northern!
dartissimus said:
Here's my Grandfather's Rover outside t'mill.
Early 1950's Dewsbury.
It might look gloomy, but it was probably a sunny day

nicanary

1,947 posts

34 months

[news] 
Thursday 10th May 2012 quote quote all
Just had a thought re the mystery car - how about a Jaguar bitsa. they were often built in those days out of a wreck. It looks a bit like the one that Major Buckley (?) built. I agree by the way about the Corsica look of the bodywork.

dartissimus

335 posts

62 months

[news] 
Thursday 10th May 2012 quote quote all
bob1179 said:
dartissimus said:
Here's my Grandfather's Rover outside t'mill.
Early 1950's Dewsbury.
It might look gloomy, but it was probably a sunny day

Do you have anymore pictures of the area at time? I would love to have seen Dewsbury, Bradford, Huddersfield etc at the time. I believe they were massively wealthy parts of the country at the time. Things have changed somewhat now...
Sorry the picture quality is so poor, it's a phone photo off a picture on my office wall! & it's a bit off-thread, although it shows local transport of the period. It was the largest mill in t'world when taken





radlet6

736 posts

62 months

[news] 
Thursday 10th May 2012 quote quote all
cjb1 said:
Here, here Sir, Goosed ECU on a modern car sends the poor thing off to the scrappers, older cars with points, condensor and a distributor start giving jip it'd be off to the scrapper to get replacements! I served my time as a motor mechanic on '70's Fords and know how to diagnose a problem, my lad is a 'Technician' at a Multi-franchise dealer, needs a laptop to sort them!
And this is part of the problem today. Technicians are not trained to diagnose problems as you were in t'good ol' days. If the computer can't tell them what the problem is they are stuffed.

Back to the thread though. How would you put a distributor and points on a modern engine? there's no hole in the engine casing for one.

Alfachick

1,619 posts

85 months

[news] 
Thursday 10th May 2012 quote quote all
piper said:
Brands Hatch circa 1961, a Lotus 17 with its body work removed, does anybody know what the car is behind it?


By piperp2 at 2012-05-09
Could it be a Riley of some description? The swage line by the door, and the upright radiator makes me think of a 30's Riley for some reason. Plus the shape of the top of the radiator would lend itself to a Riley shield nicely.
Probably talking utter rubbish though.

52classic

1,326 posts

98 months

[news] 
Friday 11th May 2012 quote quote all
My guess is a special based on a Rover P3.

W124Bob

958 posts

63 months

[news] 
Friday 11th May 2012 quote quote all
Heres another period photo taken in Dewsbury,anyone ID the micro car behind the AEC tipper

W124Bob

958 posts

63 months

[news] 
Friday 11th May 2012 quote quote all
And another form Dewsbury

W124Bob

958 posts

63 months

[news] 
Friday 11th May 2012 quote quote all
Answer my own question,AC Petite.Just an excuse to put this up,it's a still from the film "The Man Without a Body"

DickyC

17,423 posts

86 months

[news] 
Friday 11th May 2012 quote quote all
W124Bob said:
anyone ID the micro car behind the AEC tipper
Curiously, it's a relation of the Cobra.

AC was among a handful of manufacturers who built Invalid Carriages for the Health Service. They were tiny, narrow, slow and a familiar sight for many years. Their role has been taken over by the Mobility scheme which uses normal cars with modifications. They weren't permitted on the motorway. As a new driver I nearly took one out on an unlit section of the M4. It was dark and raining, I saw tail lights in the distance, looked in the mirror, glanced over my shoulder, looked back and found it wasn't tail lights in the distance, I was right on top of an invalid carriage doing about 20mph. Blimey it was close.

They carried the famous AC badge.



There were several versions. I think this was the most common.

HQB

127 posts

38 months

[news] 
Saturday 12th May 2012 quote quote all
During the 1950's, a neighbour had a new one of these "vehicles" every 2/3 years, the early ones I'm sure were badged "Invacar" and powered(ish) by a 197cc Villiers engine and all in metallic blue paintwork which quickly peeled off. The driver was a young girl who very bravely battled with the tiller steering and recalcitrant engine to get her to work and back. We lived on a hill which was cul de sac meaning that when coming home each night, she "powered" her way uphill and then had to turn around which meant a hard swerve right. Then came the misery of reversing it and this always caused a lot of manic revving, clouds of blue smoke and plenty of impressive back fires. After a struggle she eventually got the thing to go backwards and then rolled down to park outside her home in a blue haze of relief.

I suppose it got her to places but they were dreadful things and it is many years since I saw one so suspect they were all gratefully scrapped by their unfortunate recipients.rolleyessmile

DickyC

17,423 posts

86 months

[news] 
Saturday 12th May 2012 quote quote all
Yikes! There's a whole world out there we knew nothing about. There are websites, clubs and societies.

I thought they were built by several companies including AC but it turns out there were two; AC and Invacar.



The relevant bit: "Although produced jointly by both AC Cars Ltd & Invacar Ltd, the Model 70 was entirely an AC design from the ground up."

They seem now to be dreadfully undignified but you have to remember that at the time they made a vast improvement to the lives of those who used them. One of my great uncles became very disabled with old age and preferred to have his Austin 1100 converted to hand controls. It was such a ramshackle, Heath Robinson solution! Each conversion being a one-off for the firm who did them. It worked though, complete with holes in the floor for levers to pass through. For the majority, an invalid carriage was presumably considered a better option.

O/T When my uncle gave up driving I was asked by my mother to go and see him, say nice things about the car, give him what he wanted for it and drive it to the breakers. When he opened the garage there was a one owner Austin 1100, 4826 PE. "That's very nice, Jack. You haven't, er, got the history have you? All the bills and receipts and things?" "Oh, no. When I knew you were coming I had a clear out."

It had no MoT and he wanted £50 for it. It took 84p for a bulb to get it through the MoT and I used it for three years as my commuting car in the late 80s. It had front wheel drive, disc brakes and a heater. It was fine. The only real problem I had with it was the interior light wouldn't work. I would fix it and it worked once or twice and gave up again. When I took it for its fourth MoT, the garage quoted £400 for welding and told me to give up. I transferred the registration and drove the car to the breakers. They gave me £10 and directed me to a clear area by the grab. When I got out for the last time the interior light came on. I could have wept.


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