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LordGrover

Original Poster:

22,013 posts

96 months

[news] 
Tuesday 6th December 2011 quote quote all
I've just read an (American) article suggesting the way I set my mirrors may not be the best, see below:


Article here: click.

I think I'll try it before I leave tonight to see how it goes.

218g

417 posts

43 months

[news] 
Tuesday 6th December 2011 quote quote all
LordGrover said:
I've just read an (American) article suggesting the way I set my mirrors may not be the best, see below:


Article here: click.

I think I'll try it before I leave tonight to see how it goes.
It's an interesting idea. I tried it for a while but I found it too freaky and returned to what I know. I can see what they're getting at though.

One word of warning from my experience - nearly caught me out somewhat scarily. If you're on a motorway/dual carriageway with another, perhaps larger, vehicle behind you, it will at least partly block what you can see in your internal mirror of any faster traffic coming up behind and outside you. In this situation, you may, consciously or subconsciously, be used to using your offside wing mirror to look for this traffic. With your wing mirrors adjusted as the article suggests, a vehicle in the lane outside you will be much closer than you are used to before it appears in the offside wing mirror.

Adjusted as suggested, your wing mirror is better at showing you what's in your blind spot, but will give you much less notice of the guy some distance back charging up the outside.

busta

4,493 posts

117 months

[news] 
Tuesday 6th December 2011 quote quote all
Interesting article although I find without a 'reference' point e.g. the rear wing of my car, it's much harder to judge the relative positions of other vehicles from the mirrors alone.

MatthewO

209 posts

37 months

[news] 
Tuesday 6th December 2011 quote quote all
I use my near side mirror in the illustrated position, I drive for a long time on dual carriageways and I use that position of the mirror to easily see when ive passed another vehicle, it makes driving in heavy traffic much smoother and.. Well... Lazier.

I would do the same with my driver's side, but it won't adjust that far!

BliarOut

59,014 posts

123 months

[news] 
Tuesday 6th December 2011 quote quote all
The biker in me won't let me change lanes without a lifesaver even when I'm in a car smile
Advertisement

7mike

2,384 posts

77 months

[news] 
Tuesday 6th December 2011 quote quote all
Article says "Many accidents could be avoided if everyone had their car side and rearview mirrors positioned correctly, eliminating blind spots and making it easier to change lanes quickly".

I bet I can find several blindspots after the mirrors have been adjusted to eliminate them. Perhaps if the goal wasn't to change lanes quickly, ie plan ahead then maybe they wouldn't be having so many crashes on their multi-lane roads. Maybe overtaking on one side only isn't such a bad idea after all.

MatthewO

209 posts

37 months

[news] 
Wednesday 7th December 2011 quote quote all
scratchchin


MC Bodge

5,665 posts

59 months

[news] 
Wednesday 7th December 2011 quote quote all
BliarOut said:
The biker in me won't let me change lanes without a lifesaver even when I'm in a car smile
Me too.

I wish that other people would too.

aizvara

1,704 posts

51 months

[news] 
Wednesday 7th December 2011 quote quote all
BliarOut said:
The biker in me won't let me change lanes without a lifesaver even when I'm in a car smile
Maybe its just me being a cyclist, but I'm the same; I actually thought this was just normal practice?

MC Bodge

5,665 posts

59 months

[news] 
Wednesday 7th December 2011 quote quote all
It is for me

Teddye4687

367 posts

32 months

[news] 
Wednesday 7th December 2011 quote quote all
Aren't you meant to have a glance over the shoulder?

I understand this involves taking your eyes off the road, however, this is what I was taught whenever merging or pulling out.

LordGrover

Original Poster:

22,013 posts

96 months

[news] 
Wednesday 7th December 2011 quote quote all
That's the lifesaver.

No reason not to improve your field of vision using the mirrors though. I've tried it since last night and while I've not driven far, especially not on motorways/dual carriageways, I have noticed some benefit to slightly widening the angle. I'll leave it for a while and see if there is anything to report, to the good or bad.

MC Bodge

5,665 posts

59 months

[news] 
Wednesday 7th December 2011 quote quote all
I would say so, but I see many drivers not doing it.

I find it very un-nerving as a passenger and often do it for them wink

I cannot think of any reason why somebody wouldn't check before potentially pulling in front of a large lump of steel that could bump into you with some force or nudge you into the path of other traffic.

Mr Grayson

158 posts

59 months

[news] 
Wednesday 7th December 2011 quote quote all
I've adopted this after years of refusing to believe. The key for me is to adjust the mirrors such that a very slight movement of the head will bring the corner of my own car back into view as a reference. This seems to give me the best of both worlds.

MC Bodge

5,665 posts

59 months

[news] 
Wednesday 7th December 2011 quote quote all
Mr Grayson said:
The key for me is to adjust the mirrors such that a very slight movement of the head will bring the corner of my own car back into view as a reference. This seems to give me the best of both worlds.
Funnily enough, that is exactly what I've done. I like the ability(/comfort blanket?) to be able to check that my mirrors haven't been pushed outwards without my knowledge.

defblade

3,254 posts

97 months

[news] 
Wednesday 7th December 2011 quote quote all
Or use blindspot mirrors.

In fact, the outer edge of mine are curved to cover the blind spot as well, without further tweaking.

joewilliams

2,004 posts

85 months

[news] 
Wednesday 7th December 2011 quote quote all
I find that, when adjusted to show the smallest sliver of my own car, the blind spot is already eliminated.

I always check blindspots when driving a new car - as a car passes me, I follow it in the mirrors and make sure I can always see a part of it.

LordGrover

Original Poster:

22,013 posts

96 months

[news] 
Wednesday 7th December 2011 quote quote all
joewilliams said:
I find that, when adjusted to show the smallest sliver of my own car, the blind spot is already eliminated.
That was how I interpreted it. If I lean back only slightly, I can see the sides of my car if necessary.

218g

417 posts

43 months

[news] 
Wednesday 7th December 2011 quote quote all
LordGrover said:
That was how I interpreted it. If I lean back only slightly, I can see the sides of my car if necessary.
How much overlap does that leave you between the internal rear view mirror and the wing mirror?

The Article said:
The paper advocates adjusting the mirrors so far outward that the viewing angle of the side mirrors just overlaps that of the cabin's rearview mirror.
I took that to mean adjusting the wing mirror out far enough that a car coming up my outside only starts to appear in the wing mirror as it starts to disappear from the interior mirror. Adjusted thus, I found the wing mirror quite a long way from being able to see the rear corner of my car - great for seeing in the blind spot, but basically zero use for anything else.

What you and a couple of other posters have done sounds like it might be a good compromise, but not quite what I thought the article was getting at.

Zod

26,345 posts

142 months

[news] 
Wednesday 7th December 2011 quote quote all
I too tried this a few years ago and switched back because I found it too odd without at least a bit of my car in the mirror as a reference point.
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