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BFG TERRANO

Original Poster:

1,769 posts

34 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th October 2012 quote quote all
I'm an occasional cyclist but mainly car driver. I've noticed just how far from the kerb they cycle? Why? Even on good quality surfaces they are getting about a metre from the kerb. This makes passing them 1 of 2 things. You either pass to close or wait for a gap in oncoming traffic and make a wide dash for it.

Is it just me or does this bug anyone else? Or, if your a regular cyclist can you explain why?

paranoid airbag

2,181 posts

45 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th October 2012 quote quote all
Yes. In theory at least, it's to make you wait for a gap in oncoming traffic rather than passing close, if they think there isn't room for car+car+bike safely. A pothole, patch of diesel, errant wildlife, carelessly opened door, iPod zombie could all cause one to take up some space to their right, so there being enough space to fit does not necessarily mean enough space for an overtake to be safe. And if they do have space to their left, then swerving left becomes an option which it isn't if you're already as far over as possible. You're also less visible (so more vulnerable to SMIDSYs) the further you go to the left.

It does, of course, depend on the actual nature of the road.

Edited by paranoid airbag on Sunday 7th October 10:50

Stu3500

92 posts

71 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th October 2012 quote quote all
When you cycle close to the kerb, you will be amazed how many drivers will overtake you anywhere, no matter how dangerous(middle of blind corners or crests for example). By sitting out from the kerb, or two abreast, drivers tend to overtake you correctly and safely.

It's a pain in the arse for both parties, I dont want to hold cars up behind me but it really is the safest way.



ctdctd

138 posts

84 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th October 2012 quote quote all
Potholes and drains tongue out

hornetrider

48,998 posts

91 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th October 2012 quote quote all
Nowt wrong with 1m from the kerb.
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Ozzie Osmond

16,221 posts

132 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th October 2012 quote quote all
ctdctd said:
Potholes and drains tongue out
Yup, also puddles. Lack of proper road maintenance and drain clearance makes things increasingly hazardous for cyclists.

saaby93

13,044 posts

64 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th October 2012 quote quote all
paranoid airbag said:
Yes. In theory at least, it's to make you wait for a gap in oncoming traffic rather than passing close, if they think there isn't room for car+car+bike safely. A pothole, patch of diesel, errant wildlife, carelessly opened door, iPod zombie could all cause one to take up some space to their right, so there being enough space to fit does not necessarily mean enough space for an overtake to be safe. And if they do have space to their left, then swerving left becomes an option which it isn't if you're already as far over as possible. You're also less visible (so more vulnerable to SMIDSYs) the further you go to the left.
There's been quite a bit on this
Drivers are likely to give a wobbly granny on her bike more clearance than an asertive professional cyclist that looks as though they know what theyre doing.
The professional cyclist is also more likely to assert themselves by ridng in the traffic lane than keeping to the side.
Which is more or less likely to be at risk?
The worst may be those that belive they should cycle in the centre of the traffic lane same as the profesionals but unaware of the avoidance skills

BFG TERRANO

Original Poster:

1,769 posts

34 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th October 2012 quote quote all
Interesting views, thanks all I'm watching with interest.

Lordglenmorangie

2,791 posts

91 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th October 2012 quote quote all
[quote=Ozzie Osmond]

Yup, also puddles. Lack of proper road maintenance and drain clearance makes things increasingly hazardous for cyclists. [

yes

Gizmoish

18,103 posts

95 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th October 2012 quote quote all
Elsewhere, in a parallel forumverse: "Cars in stationary traffic: why so close to the kerb?"

Just a thought.


saaby93

13,044 posts

64 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th October 2012 quote quote all
Gizmoish said:
Elsewhere, in a parallel forumverse: "Cars in stationary traffic: why so close to the kerb?"

Just a thought.
Yes I was thinking that too
- to keep centre clear for an emergency vehicle to sort out why everyone is stationary?



Edited by saaby93 on Sunday 7th October 11:25

4key

8,095 posts

34 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th October 2012 quote quote all
Ozzie Osmond said:
ctdctd said:
Potholes and drains tongue out
Yup, also puddles. Lack of proper road maintenance and drain clearance makes things increasingly hazardous for cyclists.
Ive never understood this train of thought, its often used as the reason not to use cycle lanes too. Why do a vast majority of you buy cycles that are not appropriate for the surface that you are riding on?

If I was driving around in a radical on road legal slicks and started moaning about the condition of the road surface I would rightly be called a moron, so why is it different for cyclists with hard tail carbon bikes?

I know that you would travel slower using a mtb or even a roadie with a bit of suspension and chunkier tyres, but youre not having a race on public roads are you? You buy bikes that are designed to go as fast as possible on a smooth surface knowing that the enviroment that you will be using them in is far from perfect, and then moan about it. confused

Gizmoish

18,103 posts

95 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th October 2012 quote quote all
4key said:
Ive never understood this train of thought, its often used as the reason not to use cycle lanes too. Why do a vast majority of you buy cycles that are not appropriate for the surface that you are riding on?

If I was driving around in a radical on road legal slicks and started moaning about the condition of the road surface I would rightly be called a moron, so why is it different for cyclists with hard tail carbon bikes?

I know that you would travel slower using a mtb or even a roadie with a bit of suspension and chunkier tyres, but youre not having a race on public roads are you? You buy bikes that are designed to go as fast as possible on a smooth surface knowing that the enviroment that you will be using them in is far from perfect, and then moan about it. confused
This post is far too sensible and logical and therefore I shall ignore it entirely.

BFG TERRANO

Original Poster:

1,769 posts

34 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th October 2012 quote quote all
Gizmoish said:
This post is far too sensible and logical and therefore I shall ignore it entirely.
This is interesting! In A similar way to putting a track car on slicks with rock hard suspension on the road then moaning your having the sh#t shaken out of you?

blearyeyedboy

3,021 posts

65 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th October 2012 quote quote all
4key said:
Ive never understood this train of thought, its often used as the reason not to use cycle lanes too. Why do a vast majority of you buy cycles that are not appropriate for the surface that you are riding on?

If I was driving around in a radical on road legal slicks and started moaning about the condition of the road surface I would rightly be called a moron, so why is it different for cyclists with hard tail carbon bikes?

I know that you would travel slower using a mtb or even a roadie with a bit of suspension and chunkier tyres, but youre not having a race on public roads are you? You buy bikes that are designed to go as fast as possible on a smooth surface knowing that the enviroment that you will be using them in is far from perfect, and then moan about it. confused
Let's look at this from a different perspective. I don't ride a carbon-bodied racer. I have an MTB (that gets its MTB tyres swapped for road tyres, not extreme racing sorts). I also own a folding bike that's clearly set up as a commuter.

I used to try to tuck in and found that litter, poor road surfaces, painted lines and spilt oils were a hazard. The point at which I changed was after an SUV tried to squeeze past me. The road surface next to the curb stopped so I was then riding on wet cobbles. My front wheel lost grip as I tried to turn. I landed with my nose about an inch from his front alloy.

I can tell you it was a navy X5 and I can still picture the alloys clearly, particularly the one next to my nose.

I could see the road surface was about to change, but until then I thought it'd be antisocial to ride further out and probably hold up drivers. After that, it became obvious that some car drivers would rather kill me than slow down to try to be equally considerate to me.

You may not agree with me, but my reply is honest: If a significant minority of drivers would put my life in danger rather than slow down, then I'm going to ride further out from the kerb. That way I've got a metre or so of safety margin to play with as an escape route if I need it instead of a tiny strip. Sorry for the good drivers who get delayed by my stance, but my priority is to stop the significant minority from trying to kill me and if your journey has to be a bit longer to achieve that, so be it.

ctdctd

138 posts

84 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th October 2012 quote quote all
4key said:
Ive never understood this train of thought, its often used as the reason not to use cycle lanes too. Why do a vast majority of you buy cycles that are not appropriate for the surface that you are riding on?

If I was driving around in a radical on road legal slicks and started moaning about the condition of the road surface I would rightly be called a moron, so why is it different for cyclists with hard tail carbon bikes?

I know that you would travel slower using a mtb or even a roadie with a bit of suspension and chunkier tyres, but youre not having a race on public roads are you? You buy bikes that are designed to go as fast as possible on a smooth surface knowing that the enviroment that you will be using them in is far from perfect, and then moan about it. confused
It's 'cos, unlike the lardy car drivers in their armchairs, we cyclists have to use effort and the heavier the bike, the harder it is!tongue out

(When I say "we", I mean "we" as in "young fit" which describes myself about 25 years ago)cry

Mr Gear

9,110 posts

76 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th October 2012 quote quote all
BFG TERRANO said:
wait for a gap in oncoming traffic and make a wide dash for it.
Correct answer.

Horns

323 posts

49 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th October 2012 quote quote all
"give motorcyclists, cyclists and horse riders at least as much room as you would when overtaking a car"

From a little book called 'The Highway Code'. It's worth a read.

BFG TERRANO

Original Poster:

1,769 posts

34 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th October 2012 quote quote all
Thanks again for the different views, never again will I think cyclists are being rude or awkward. Every day is a school day as they say.

aizvara

1,718 posts

53 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th October 2012 quote quote all
4key said:
Ive never understood this train of thought, its often used as the reason not to use cycle lanes too. Why do a vast majority of you buy cycles that are not appropriate for the surface that you are riding on?

If I was driving around in a radical on road legal slicks and started moaning about the condition of the road surface I would rightly be called a moron, so why is it different for cyclists with hard tail carbon bikes?

I know that you would travel slower using a mtb or even a roadie with a bit of suspension and chunkier tyres, but youre not having a race on public roads are you? You buy bikes that are designed to go as fast as possible on a smooth surface knowing that the enviroment that you will be using them in is far from perfect, and then moan about it. confused
I have a hybrid bike, theoretically fine for a bit of off-road and also, you'd think, fine for our roads, cycle paths and suchlike. However it will definitely suffer buckled wheels if I'm forced into a pothole, and it does lose a lot of grip when I cycle near the edge in general, and in the few painted-on cycle paths I encounter in particular.

Most of my journey would be fine on any bike, no matter how rigid, as it is fairly smooth. It is just if you are forced to ride in the gutter that things become difficult.
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