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snotrag

Original Poster:

10,693 posts

94 months

[news] 
Tuesday 2nd November 2010 quote quote all
I've never been in this situation before!

Just had a "Doctors Appointment" this morning at another company, by the time I'd got back to the car they'd offered me the position.

Now I'm back at work. Very small company. Massive job on at the moment which im heavily involved with.

No contract of employment (shocking and illegal, I know part of the reason for me wanting out).

Need to resign. What do I tell them? Gotta draft a letter tonight. How much notice do I say I'll work?

I dont owe the company anything, I do feel a bit bad about letting some of the 'people' down. I'm not exactly jumping to help them out after the way my year has gone, but again I'm not an absolute XXXX so I dont want to totally drop them in it. Its also a move within the industry so I dont want to piss anyone off too much. (New company knows old company etc).

How long do I give them? Bear in mind I'm 'junior' or 'slightly up from Junior' level.

And - Do I tell current employer who I'm moving to, or keep schtum?

This is the most bizzare day at work ever now. I keep grinning but nobody knows what at. And I can't concentrate. Its almost unfortunate in a way that I'm too nice/sensible a person not to just walk off, it wouldn't half be liberating!

bob1179

13,721 posts

92 months

[news] 
Tuesday 2nd November 2010 quote quote all
Write a nice letter of resignation offering two weeks notice.

Or,

Say 'I'm leaving, have a nice life'. Walk out and don't come back.

smile

Shay HTFC

3,176 posts

72 months

[news] 
Tuesday 2nd November 2010 quote quote all
Do it the nice way. You never know when you might come across your current boss again in business.

camp freddie

239 posts

58 months

[news] 
Tuesday 2nd November 2010 quote quote all
Would be wise to have a formal written offer before handing in your notice?

Muzzlehatch

3,985 posts

125 months

[news] 
Tuesday 2nd November 2010 quote quote all
snotrag said:
Just had a "Doctors Appointment" this morning at another company, by the time I'd got back to the car they'd offered me the position.
I trust you took holiday to do this, rather than doing it on company time?

snotrag said:
No contract of employment (shocking and illegal, I know part of the reason for me wanting out).

Need to resign. What do I tell them? Gotta draft a letter tonight. How much notice do I say I'll work?
If there's no contract then just say you're off and will stay long enough to do a handover. 1 week should be fine. If you were very important to them, they would have given you a contract to tie you in for a month or even a quarter.
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Jonathan27

454 posts

47 months

[news] 
Tuesday 2nd November 2010 quote quote all
Just because you don't have a written contract does not mean that you don't have any contract. You will have an inferred contract, however conveniently this leaves notice open, I would suggest a month in a junior position and up to three months in a more senior post.

williamp

12,286 posts

156 months

[news] 
Tuesday 2nd November 2010 quote quote all
Shay HTFC said:
Do it the nice way. You never know when you might come across your current boss again in business.
Thuis. its a small world, business leaders know other business leaders, and they all talk. besides, they might be clients one day...

Mr Whippy

18,816 posts

124 months

[news] 
Tuesday 2nd November 2010 quote quote all
If the industry is pretty tight I'd work notice of two weeks, more to help your friends out at work, than the company.

After all, one of those people you help out might be working with you, or getting work for you, or something else, in 5 years time... nice to leave them with a good opinion of you I think smile

Dave

Fatman2

1,445 posts

52 months

[news] 
Tuesday 2nd November 2010 quote quote all
Shay HTFC said:
Do it the nice way. You never know when you might come across your current boss again in business.
+1

Always best to leave with a 100% clear conscience irrespective of how the company is (within reason of course).

Phone up your prospective employer to discuss their needs and to request written confirmation asap.

Once received have a chat with your boss to discuss his needs. He/she may be happy for you to do two weeks but may prefer 1 month. Hopefully both parties will be satisfied but if not then negotiate before submitting your letter of resignation.

Keep the letter respectful and thankful as you're young and you never know what's roung the corner.

Hope this helps!

Grey Ghost

3,269 posts

103 months

[news] 
Tuesday 2nd November 2010 quote quote all
If your new employer does things properly you will have a contract to sign on or before day 1 that will stipulate your notice period. If you know the standard period of notice for your position within your industry then offer that as your new employer will be anticipating you serving this out ahead of joining them. If you fancy a little time off between roles then agree a start date with your new employer (1 month from today for example) and an end date with your current employer that allows you some time off inbetween.

One thing I would do is to sign your new contract before resigning as that will tell you when they expect you to start and allow you to negotiate your leaving date from your current employer.

Leave on good terms as said before biggrin

AndyAudi

1,835 posts

105 months

[news] 
Tuesday 2nd November 2010 quote quote all
Congratulations!

Resigning is a funny one as you never know how they're going to react I've been asked to work for 3 months & also asked to leave after a couple of weeks. Also had a boss that refused to speak to me for weeks!

Before resigning please make sure you have your new job offer in writing.
I'd ask your new company when they'd like you to start, stating if you wish you're involved in a big project and don't want to drop your old co in it. Figure out how long you'd like to give your old co (2 - 4 weeks?)

If your happy to speak to your boss do so and back it up in writing, below is similar to what I've used in the past.

Good luck

Dear ??
As per conversation with yourself on ???.
Please accept this as formal notice of my resignation from the position of ??? with effect from ???.
I understand there is a high workload at present and, as discussed, I am happy to continue to work ?? weeks notice until ???, if required, to ensure suitable handovers are communicated where appropriate
After ?? years I believe now is the right time for me to look for something new and I thank you for your support and friendship during my period of employment here.
Yours sincerely




Andy OH

1,304 posts

133 months

[news] 
Tuesday 2nd November 2010 quote quote all
AndyAudi said:
Before resigning please make sure you have your new job offer in writing.
I'd ask your new company when they'd like you to start, stating if you wish you're involved in a big project and don't want to drop your old co in it. Figure out how long you'd like to give your old co (2 - 4 weeks?)

If your happy to speak to your boss do so and back it up in writing, below is similar to what I've used in the past.

Good luck

Dear ??
As per conversation with yourself on ???.
Please accept this as formal notice of my resignation from the position of ??? with effect from ???.
I understand there is a high workload at present and, as discussed, I am happy to continue to work ?? weeks notice until ???, if required, to ensure suitable handovers are communicated where appropriate
After ?? years I believe now is the right time for me to look for something new and I thank you for your support and friendship during my period of employment here.
Yours sincerely
^^^^ This.

Never resign from one company before you have the official offer in writing from the company you are about to join, and always write a letter or note of your formal notice of resignation and hand it to your boss.

NerveAgent

383 posts

103 months

[news] 
Tuesday 2nd November 2010 quote quote all
I just saved a template from i-resign.com or something, filled in the relevant details. I then emailed my boss for a "quick chat" in a meeting room and handed him the letter and explained the situation.

I actually found it quite nerve wracking but it wasnt so bad in the end! If they really want to keep you they will offer you many empty promises, I would ignore these and remember why you wanted to leave in the first place wink

Lefty

13,488 posts

85 months

[news] 
Tuesday 2nd November 2010 quote quote all
Shay HTFC said:
Do it the nice way. You never know when you might come across your current boss again in business.
This. Don't burn bridges, ever. Do everything you can to make the transition for your replacement as smooth as possible.

Devil2575

7,667 posts

71 months

[news] 
Tuesday 2nd November 2010 quote quote all
Jonathan27 said:
Just because you don't have a written contract does not mean that you don't have any contract. You will have an inferred contract,
An inferred contract?

Given that there is nothing in writing i'd suggest that an inferred contract isn't worth the paper it's not written on... biggrin

I'd suspect the reason he hasn't had a proper contract is so that the company can dump him quickly if required.

I'd be polite and professional but not give them anything more than in strictly necessary. Don't burn bridges but don't let them walk all over you. Employers that don't give out proper contracts are to be avoided. My brother in law has been in this postion before and ended up losing a lot of unpaid wages due to there being nothing in writing...



Edited by Devil2575 on Tuesday 2nd November 13:59

RDMcG

8,476 posts

90 months

[news] 
Tuesday 2nd November 2010 quote quote all
I think a couple of weeks is fine. In a resignation letter, stick to the facts:

- you have been offered a position elsewhere
-you enjoyed working in your current position and have only good things to say about the company
-you enjoyed working with your boss
-you will work over the next two weeks to tidy up existing work as well as possible

I think it was De Gaulel who said " The graveyards are full of indispensable men". I have had this situation with employees many times, and its part of doing business. It can be very inconvenient, but companies deal with it.

edc

4,791 posts

134 months

[news] 
Tuesday 2nd November 2010 quote quote all
Devil2575 said:
Jonathan27 said:
Just because you don't have a written contract does not mean that you don't have any contract. You will have an inferred contract,
An inferred contract?

Given that there is nothing in writing i'd suggest that an inferred contract isn't worth the paper it's not written on... biggrin

I'd suspect the reason he hasn't had a proper contract is so that the company can dump him quickly if required.

I'd be polite and professional but not give them anything more than in strictly necessary. Don't burn bridges but don't let them walk all over you. Employers that don't give out proper contracts are to be avoided. My brother in law has been in this postion before and ended up losing a lot of unpaid wages due to there being nothing in writing...



Edited by Devil2575 on Tuesday 2nd November 13:59
Statutory notice will apply if there is no contractual notice.

edc

4,791 posts

134 months

[news] 
Tuesday 2nd November 2010 quote quote all
Devil2575 said:
Jonathan27 said:
Just because you don't have a written contract does not mean that you don't have any contract. You will have an inferred contract,
An inferred contract?

Given that there is nothing in writing i'd suggest that an inferred contract isn't worth the paper it's not written on... biggrin

I'd suspect the reason he hasn't had a proper contract is so that the company can dump him quickly if required.

I'd be polite and professional but not give them anything more than in strictly necessary. Don't burn bridges but don't let them walk all over you. Employers that don't give out proper contracts are to be avoided. My brother in law has been in this postion before and ended up losing a lot of unpaid wages due to there being nothing in writing...



Edited by Devil2575 on Tuesday 2nd November 13:59
Statutory notice will apply if there is no contractual notice.

Muzzer

3,814 posts

104 months

[news] 
Tuesday 2nd November 2010 quote quote all
Dear Your Boss

Please accept this letter as notice of my resignation.

I am required to give four weeks notice, therefore my last working day will be XX XX 2010.

Yours

You.

Don't burn bridges
Don't make it emotional - thanking them for the opportunities, etc is cringeworthy.
Don't use it as a forum to tell them what's wrong with the company
Don't hand it over under you have an offer in writing from the other company

Keep it simple and professional. It's just a formal notification that you're leaving. (Diplomatically)expand on reasons why in an exit interview if you wish.

MonkeyMatt

5,231 posts

90 months

[news] 
Tuesday 2nd November 2010 quote quote all
Why dont you go and speak to your boss. Tell him that you are going to be giving him a letter of resignation and you would like to discuss the details such as how long he needs to get your work handed over and any other outstanding issues. Then you can write a letter formally and hand it in.
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