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NeMiSiS

4,496 posts

58 months

[news] 
Wednesday 1st December 2010 quote quote all
Ive been taking a few snaps of a couple of watches in the snow, to give the impression of adverse conditions, but they were pooh. I shall perservere until I get what I want.

I can't keep a snow flake on the watch face for long enough to get the shot, before it melts or half melts !

Anyone got any watch in snow shots of their own.

NB. I get excellent light reflection from the snow all around the subject, but can't get the right shot.

andy_s

9,778 posts

142 months

[news] 
Wednesday 8th December 2010 quote quote all


You get some interesting results when you start playing around, I was trying to highlight the lume colours and it turned out looking quite cool I thought.


NeMiSiS

4,496 posts

58 months

[news] 
Tuesday 14th December 2010 quote quote all
andy_s said:


You get some interesting results when you start playing around, I was trying to highlight the lume colours and it turned out looking quite cool I thought.
That lume paint is so thick it almost looks like a tritium tube.

andy_s

9,778 posts

142 months

[news] 
Tuesday 14th December 2010 quote quote all
NeMiSiS said:
andy_s said:


You get some interesting results when you start playing around, I was trying to highlight the lume colours and it turned out looking quite cool I thought.
That lume paint is so thick it almost looks like a tritium tube.
It's supposed to be Promethium-147 according to the specs, but it's gone the same colour as Tritium, guess I'll never know. (Plus P-147 has a short half-life, 2 1/2 yrs or something and I can still make out a faint glow)

chicowot

30 posts

114 months

[news] 
Monday 20th December 2010 quote quote all
Here is one I took of my latest watch. Hope you like it





C90 lume by M1RVW, on Flickr
Advertisement

chicowot

30 posts

114 months

[news] 
Monday 20th December 2010 quote quote all
Here is one I took of my latest watch. Hope you like it





C90 lume by M1RVW, on Flickr

chicowot

30 posts

114 months

[news] 
Friday 24th December 2010 quote quote all
My fav at the moment Christopher Ward DBR1

DBR1,. by M1RVW, on Flickr

BluePurpleRed

816 posts

109 months

[news] 
Tuesday 28th December 2010 quote quote all
If I may add this in here, I did a separate post, but I thought that I would also include it in here. I like the long posts, keep them up. I was a bit inspired by this sub section and also TZ-UK to get some kit, and below is the result. I think they are ok. A bit cheesy with the snow, but hey ho.

I treated myself to a new D90 with a macro extension tubes, so I thought that I would get some watches out of the collection and try to take a few photos.

The I thought I would post a few on here. I am torn between here and the Photography section smile

I haven't got a light box etc so I thought a snow covered table outside would provide a decent setting. F'ing cold though!


DSC_0423 by pie_consuming_fool, on Flickr


DSC_0410 by pie_consuming_fool, on Flickr


DSC_0380 by pie_consuming_fool, on Flickr


DSC_0369 by pie_consuming_fool, on Flickr


DSC_0344 by pie_consuming_fool, on Flickr

NeMiSiS

4,496 posts

58 months

[news] 
Sunday 13th February 2011 quote quote all
^^^^^^^^^Excellent.

al1991

4,352 posts

63 months

[news] 
Tuesday 1st March 2011 quote quote all


This is about the best I can manage, reflections are an issue for me.

Still, all I have to use is a 7 year old Olympus compact which runs off 2 x AA batteries which cost me £50, so not too bad I guess.

Robbie B

7,003 posts

66 months

[news] 
Sunday 9th October 2011 quote quote all
Just did a shoot of one of the birthday presents I have bought my girlfriend. Not quite the same price tag as some on here, but let me know what you think.



Click for larger size.

AndyParker

13 posts

32 months

[news] 
Saturday 12th November 2011 quote quote all
Great thread!

Going to give this a go once I've digested a few of the tips!

hiscocks

247 posts

66 months

[news] 
Saturday 12th November 2011 quote quote all
I made a light box at home and used it for a few shots:






roogi

216 posts

42 months

[news] 
Monday 5th December 2011 quote quote all
hiscocks said:
I made a light box at home and used it for a few shots:
Have you got a guide or any info on how to make a lightbox?

LordGrover

21,867 posts

95 months

[news] 
Monday 5th December 2011 quote quote all
roogi said:
hiscocks said:
I made a light box at home and used it for a few shots:
Have you got a guide or any info on how to make a lightbox?
Click.

hiscocks

247 posts

66 months

[news] 
Monday 5th December 2011 quote quote all
That's exactly what I did. Worked really well. I changed the colour of the card to create different effects:




GetCarter

19,133 posts

162 months

[news] 
Friday 6th April 2012 quote quote all
My efforts - taken with Nikon D3 and 105mm Micro

http://www.stevecarter.com/random/watch.htm


AndrewWF

280 posts

25 months

[news] 
Monday 25th June 2012 quote quote all
Ever wondered how those almost unreal press images of watches are taken, like this one?



Its a time consuming type of image to get, but nevertheless it is very possible to achieve without spending professional levels on your camera equipment.

It all starts with the lighting:



This complete lighting set can be assembled for less than £1000, yet will give excellent control and power for watch photography. The lighting kit is mainly Lencarta. The camera is a Nikon D90 with a Sigma 150mm macro lens.

The key to lighting a watch, particularly a curved, reflective one such as the Breitling Galaxy, is to do it in stages. First, we compose the shot by positioning the watch on our white paper background with c clips and white tack and framing it up on the camera. You can't see it in the image, but the dial of the watch is facing up.

We then use the two softboxes to light the sides of the case, using the modelling lamps to get an idea of the reflections caused. Set the camera to live view for a real time update of the lighting setup.

The third light with honeycomb grid is used to shine a spotlight on the watch from above and behind, lighting the dial. The translucent reflector diffuses the light - experiment with the angles to pick out detail on the dial and get the watch looking how you want.

We then use pieces of black and white card to minimise unwanted reflections on the watch and bounce light back onto the underside. Being curved and polished, it wants to reflect everything, so propping up the card will help us control that. We can't control every reflection, but we can minimise the amount of work we need to do in post production.

Lastly, we can use more pieces of white card held between the translucent reflector and the watch itself (known as a gobo) to add some gradients to the reflective surface. Holding a thin strip (long enough so your hands arent reflected), see how you can control the tone and gradient of the metal on the case and hands to create a pleasing shape to them.

Now we can take the shot. I shoot in RAW, using live view, and the camera set to manual, aperture around f16. The shutter speed and lighting power on the flashes is then adjusted to suit. A remote shutter release is handy, because it leaves your hands free to hold pieces of card, and you don't knock the camera when you shoot. Some press images are made up from several images, building up a composite of the dial and various elements of the case with varied lighting to create a perfect (although often unbelievable) image. In this instance, just the one shot was taken.

Once you're happy with the image, open it up in Camera RAW:



Adjust the sliders until you see the image 'pop.' RAW images are very flat, awaiting the adjustments to be made in post production, so don't be afraid to whack sliders like contrast and clarity right up.

The great thing about Camera RAW is the ability to edit the image non destructively, ie, the original data is never lost. Do as much work as you can in Camera RAW as it makes the workflow a lot simpler.

The spot tool in Camera RAW is great once you've got the hang of it, allowing the removal of dust blobs (which are inevitable) quickly and easily. I prefer it set to 'heal' mode rather than clone, as it blends the change in. It's a clever tool because if there is a definite line though the part you are trying to heal, as long as you set the target point as an area with the same line, it won't blur the line, but it will heal the dust blob.

The last part of Camera RAW to use is the brushes tool. This allows similar adjustments to the first part of Camera RAW, but in select areas, allowing some further adjustment to the image, again in a non destructive way.

Once happy, we can open the image in Photoshop:



Use the clone and heal tools for any patches too complex for the Camera RAW tools. As well as dust, you can also use it to clean up any unwanted reflections too. Then you can use Dodge and Burn (set very low) to add some more shape and contrast to the watch, darkening the darker areas and lightening the lighter ones. Plain chrome can be quite flat, so it makes it pop a little more.

Next we cut the watch out:



Set a solid white layer below your watch layer, then use the pen tool to carefully cut the watch out. The pen tool can be quite tricky to master, but the click and drag to create arcs makes it very quick and accurate when you get the hang of it. Once you've made your path, go to the 'Paths' tab, right click and 'make a selection' from it, with feather set to 1. Use the selection to make a layer mask, and voila, one cut out watch.

Now we can make the final tweaks:



For added definition and contrast, we create a high pass layer. Duplicate your watch cutout, layer mask and all, and desaturate it. Then, go to 'filter,' 'other,' 'high pass,' and select 10. Set the layer blending mode to 'soft light' and opacity to 50%.

Lastly, we can balance out the dial and case with two layer masked brightness/contrast adjustments, bringing them more into line.

And that's it!


RobbieKB

7,003 posts

66 months

[news] 
Monday 25th June 2012 quote quote all
Well, there's your comprehensive response clap

AndrewWF

280 posts

25 months

[news] 
Tuesday 26th June 2012 quote quote all
RobbieKB said:
Well, there's your comprehensive response clap
Thanks! The scary thing is, for a full blown Rolex/Breitling/Omega et al publicity shot, the workload goes up tenfold! They build up their images from many composite images, lighting each part of the case, strap and dial in sections and compiling them all into one image. The retouching is then much, much more extensive too, often repainting and retexturing entire areas. Some images end up looking like illustrations...
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