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bicycleshorts

1,788 posts

44 months

[news] 
Monday 1st October 2012 quote quote all
miln0039 said:
Looks like you made a good start to Weber ownership!!

As for the extinguishing of coals - if you're using Weber Briquettes all I do is close the top and bottom vents fully and then leave it. The BBQ will starve of oxygen and the fire will cool down surprisingly quickly. You can then get a second burn out of some of the coals which are left more intact.

When you say your mate lifted the grill - do you mean you didn't put the chimney on the bottom coal grill and instead put it right on top? You shouldn't be putting the chimney starter on the cooking grill, get it on the next one down and hang the grill off the side, then you simply pop it in place after you've turned the chimney over!

As for the chimney time, for a full load of coals I usually allow 35 minutes or so for it to get full lit - how did your times compare with this?
All good tips, thanks thumbup

It was probably about 20-30 mins. Tbh, I think I was just impatient since I'm used to crappy disposable ones smile

pokethepope

2,405 posts

71 months

[news] 
Monday 1st October 2012 quote quote all
Yep about half an hour for me as well (to get it jet engine/furnace hot). A chimney is not really to speed up the lighting, but to make it 1000x more effective in getting every single piece fully lit compared with just piling them up.

bicycleshorts

1,788 posts

44 months

[news] 
Monday 1st October 2012 quote quote all
pokethepope said:
Yep about half an hour for me as well (to get it jet engine/furnace hot). A chimney is not really to speed up the lighting, but to make it 1000x more effective in getting every single piece fully lit compared with just piling them up.
Good to know. Haven't tried lighting a proper coal BBQ without a starter before so wasn't sure what to expect. The coals came out looking great though, gave a nice even distribution of heat as well.

Think I'm going to drill a hole and fit a thermometer, had no idea what was going on so just left it for 80 mins. Checked temperature with a meat thermometer after that.

Steameh

3,152 posts

93 months

[news] 
Sunday 14th October 2012 quote quote all
Am thinking of my firt foray in to smoker/bbq.

Usually have had gas bbq's but I fancy something that imparts a fair amount of flavour. Strange time of year I know, but I have been meaning to get one for ages. I don't want to outlay a load of cash, so I was thinking about the Argos Deluxe kettle bbq (£34), a temp gauge for the outside(£12), some charcoal brickettes, a chimney starter and some flavoured wood chips.

My plan is to try and start with some chicken, with the aim of doing in a few weeks a pork butt for some pulled pork. I have read a few sites about hot smoking using kettle BBQ's, I guess my question is has anyone tried hot smoking? I know you need to set the coals to one side, have the smoke exit above the meat and have a tray full of water to take the drips. The times I've seen for pulled pork are around 12-18 hours depending on the size of the shoulder.

Anyone have any advice or tips (looking to buy this week)

escargot

Original Poster:

16,643 posts

100 months

[news] 
Sunday 14th October 2012 quote quote all
Hi mate, you're in good company here - there are some seriously experienced contributors to this thread.

One thing I would say to you regarding the cheapy kettle barbie is; you'll have to replace it pretty soon as unlike buying a proper Weber, they really don't last. My view would be to invest the extra few quid and buy the largest kettle Weber you can. I've had mine for 3 years and it's lived outside uncovered throughout that time and it's still in perfect nick.

As regards to advice on smoking a joint like a pork shoulder - long and low is your friend. Over a certain temperature the smoke no longer penetrates the meat so you simply achieve a superficial smokey taste on the exterior, when what you really want is a deep smoked depth of flavour.

Secondly, you'll need a meat thermometer - big joints on the barbecue ought to be cooked to temperature and not time, anything in and around 165f is perfect.

Thirdly, don't forget to rest the meat for a decent period of time.

Finally, it can seem quite daunting to start with but barbecuing and smoking is actually quite forgiving as long as you get the temperature regulated properly - I find the best thing is the experimentation, so good luck!
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Steameh

3,152 posts

93 months

[news] 
Sunday 14th October 2012 quote quote all
Thanks for the reply, would this be a better option then;

http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Product/partNumber/3...

Do you combine rubs with smoking as well then? I will have to invest in a decent meat thermometer. I am under no illusion that the first few times it might be a disaster, but the thought of a pull pork sandwich covered in slaw and bbq sauce is just too tempting not to try!

escargot

Original Poster:

16,643 posts

100 months

[news] 
Sunday 14th October 2012 quote quote all
Steameh said:
Thanks for the reply, would this be a better option then;

http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Product/partNumber/3...

Do you combine rubs with smoking as well then? I will have to invest in a decent meat thermometer. I am under no illusion that the first few times it might be a disaster, but the thought of a pull pork sandwich covered in slaw and bbq sauce is just too tempting not to try!
That would be much better and is a cracking buy at that price too.

Pulled pork isn't too difficult mate as long as you cook it low enough and to the correct temperature. It's a fatty enough cut of meat to survive without drying out if you cook it for a bit too long.

As regards to rubs, that's personal taste, I generally just knock up whatever I have to hand but inevitably it will include some basics like paprika, brown sugar, chilli powder, mustard power, salt, pepper etc etc.

Edited by escargot on Sunday 14th October 18:48

miln0039

1,984 posts

41 months

[news] 
Sunday 14th October 2012 quote quote all
Steameh - get the best kettle you can and once you do have it just practice the art of maintaining a fire. Nothing too complex in the food with hot smoking, it's all about maintaining a fire as best you can!!

But I hope you take the plunge, it's the best investment I ever made smile

Shaolin

2,557 posts

72 months

[news] 
Sunday 14th October 2012 quote quote all
If you can, go for the 57cm, it has 50% more cooking area than the 47cm and a lot more space under the lid.

bicycleshorts

1,788 posts

44 months

[news] 
Monday 29th October 2012 quote quote all
croakey said:
2kg pulled pork at the right temp (240-270f) takes me about 5 1/2 - 6 hours as a guide (although I use an instant read to judge when it's cooked)
Looking to do some pulled pork for Halloween on Wednesday. Only issue is that I leave for work about 9 and don't get back home till 6. Would 9 hours be too long to slow cook?

croakey

672 posts

71 months

[news] 
Monday 29th October 2012 quote quote all
Last weekend... Couple of friends over STEAK NIGHT


The largest rib joint morrissons had cut into 3 rather manly steaks

Weber fired up - steaks on, merguez sausages on and smoked chilli sausages as a bonus


Brilliant night... It might be the October, the ground may be sodden, but fire up the chiminea and enjoy being outside!

miln0039

1,984 posts

41 months

[news] 
Monday 29th October 2012 quote quote all
Thinking about slow cooking some ribs next weekend. Familiar with the required prep I need to do but just wondering what people here do time and temperature wise? I will be using a Weber Kettle, minion method - would guess 200-240 Fahrenheit?

Advice appreciated!

Cheers,
Alex

andrewrob

2,254 posts

73 months

[news] 
Monday 29th October 2012 quote quote all
Has anyone tried cooking a Juicy Lucy? Saw it on man vs food the other week and I'm itching to do some at the next BBQ.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JlCaYKAKSp8

miln0039

1,984 posts

41 months

[news] 
Monday 29th October 2012 quote quote all
andrewrob said:
Has anyone tried cooking a Juicy Lucy? Saw it on man vs food the other week and I'm itching to do some at the next BBQ.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JlCaYKAKSp8
I've eaten many....that probably doesn't help?

bicycleshorts

1,788 posts

44 months

[news] 
Tuesday 30th October 2012 quote quote all
bicycleshorts said:
croakey said:
2kg pulled pork at the right temp (240-270f) takes me about 5 1/2 - 6 hours as a guide (although I use an instant read to judge when it's cooked)
Looking to do some pulled pork for Halloween on Wednesday. Only issue is that I leave for work about 9 and don't get back home till 6. Would 9 hours be too long to slow cook?
Anyone got any idea? Thinking top vent open, bottom lid 1/3 to 1/2 open and hoping not for rain!

Output Flange

14,162 posts

94 months

[news] 
Tuesday 30th October 2012 quote quote all
bicycleshorts said:
Anyone got any idea? Thinking top vent open, bottom lid 1/3 to 1/2 open and hoping not for rain!
Depending on the size, 9 hours need not be a problem for cooking time.

The problem will come in keeping it warm enough while unattended for that long. Given the ambient temperatures are now in single figures, I suspect that even using the minion method you won't be able to keep the temp up for that long without adding more along the way.

miln0039

1,984 posts

41 months

[news] 
Tuesday 30th October 2012 quote quote all
miln0039 said:
Thinking about slow cooking some ribs next weekend. Familiar with the required prep I need to do but just wondering what people here do time and temperature wise? I will be using a Weber Kettle, minion method - would guess 200-240 Fahrenheit?

Advice appreciated!

Cheers,
Alex
  • cough*bump*cough*
Any indicative cooking times? smile

bicycleshorts

1,788 posts

44 months

[news] 
Tuesday 30th October 2012 quote quote all
Output Flange said:
bicycleshorts said:
Anyone got any idea? Thinking top vent open, bottom lid 1/3 to 1/2 open and hoping not for rain!
Depending on the size, 9 hours need not be a problem for cooking time.

The problem will come in keeping it warm enough while unattended for that long. Given the ambient temperatures are now in single figures, I suspect that even using the minion method you won't be able to keep the temp up for that long without adding more along the way.
Hmm, didn't really think of that. Will have a look in the shop tonight and see how much a shoulder is going to cost me before deciding whether to risk it or not.

Shaolin

2,557 posts

72 months

[news] 
Tuesday 30th October 2012 quote quote all
bicycleshorts said:
Hmm, didn't really think of that. Will have a look in the shop tonight and see how much a shoulder is going to cost me before deciding whether to risk it or not.
I'd save it for the w/e or when you're around. It takes a little while to get the temp right and you'll have to add coals part way through. You may come home to something blasted but then gone cold hours ago, or something hardly cooked at all with loads of coals left that haven't burnt yet.

bicycleshorts

1,788 posts

44 months

[news] 
Tuesday 30th October 2012 quote quote all
Shaolin said:
bicycleshorts said:
Hmm, didn't really think of that. Will have a look in the shop tonight and see how much a shoulder is going to cost me before deciding whether to risk it or not.
I'd save it for the w/e or when you're around. It takes a little while to get the temp right and you'll have to add coals part way through. You may come home to something blasted but then gone cold hours ago, or something hardly cooked at all with loads of coals left that haven't burnt yet.
Hmm, possibly, but if I can get a cheap shoulder it's worth a go. Will see what the prices are like in Lidl etc. tonight smile
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