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Muncher

Original Poster:

9,506 posts

134 months

[news] 
Monday 8th October 2012 quote quote all
Yeah we've done all the underfloor heating ourselves, the only thing we haven't really done is facing brickwork and some of the more tricky bits on the roof such as the lead.

It's pretty straightforward to lay, but a fair amount of work, a few days for the upstairs but on the extension, 2 days for the ground floor to get all the pipe work in. If you haven't bought it yet I can recommend a really good company for the supply of the kit.

We are 10 months in, but only 5 months since the grant of planning permission. It's starting to get a bit cold and dark now, hopefully it will be a little less draughty once the windows are in, but we can't order any of the doors until we know the finished floor level of the screed, hence the urgency to get this down.

I am told all the pipe is down now and the pressure tester is on showing a constant pressure so the floor screeners can start a day early on Wednesday.

CSJXX

290 posts

77 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
Very good. Im impressed! ive decided to get a company in to installed the heating and screed for insurance reasons.

We have decided to do it the other way. We installed the bifold doors so we know the height to work to.

We just need to decide on what floor finish to choose so we know how much screed to put down.

I'm waiting on electrics quotes still for a full rewire. Could you send me a DM on prices your expecting to pay?

Thanks!

Muncher

Original Poster:

9,506 posts

134 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
CSJXX said:
Very good. Im impressed! ive decided to get a company in to installed the heating and screed for insurance reasons.

We have decided to do it the other way. We installed the bifold doors so we know the height to work to.

We just need to decide on what floor finish to choose so we know how much screed to put down.

I'm waiting on electrics quotes still for a full rewire. Could you send me a DM on prices your expecting to pay?

Thanks!
Provided the system is pressure tested prior to screeding and whilst screeding I think it will be as safe as houses, the pipe is extremely tough, the only danger is kinking it when it is installed which is obvious.

Are you after a price for the electrics? If so that may not be entirely representative as my uncle is an electrician supplying the kit and we're installing it and he's signing it off.

CSJXX

290 posts

77 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
Yeah true, just worried about what if, same reason I've got a sovereign approved rep doing the tanking rather than myself is the insurance garantee!

I'm just doing all the donkey work to save on labour and time! I got quote roughly 7k for UHF and screeding of 150m3 and several zones with wireless thermo stats. That sound reasonable?

If you can ask him how much it would cost for normal public would be interesting for a comparison?

You lucky having a family sparky! I need one haha!


Muncher

Original Poster:

9,506 posts

134 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
CSJXX said:
Yeah true, just worried about what if, same reason I've got a sovereign approved rep doing the tanking rather than myself is the insurance garantee!

I'm just doing all the donkey work to save on labour and time! I got quote roughly 7k for UHF and screeding of 150m3 and several zones with wireless thermo stats. That sound reasonable?

If you can ask him how much it would cost for normal public would be interesting for a comparison?

You lucky having a family sparky! I need one haha!
To do mine I imagine around £5-6k if you wanted all the electrics done excluding supply of the lights themselves as there is quite a lot to do.

The UFH depends on exactly what youre getting really as the costs vary, I'm paying about £4.4k for the a system with 16 zones, trays for upstairs, 15 network thermostats, half with floor sensors, central touch screen control panel, 1200m of pipe and all the other necessary bits. That covers around 210sqm. My screeder is £500 and then another £700 or so for sand and cement plus a large mixer hire.


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CSJXX

290 posts

77 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
5-6k, sounds like a bargain! I've had quotes of 25k!

Im currently waiting for more quotes, as I thought that were ridiculous!

I was planning on only installing UFH downstairs as when I looked into the aluminium spreader plates seemed expensive?

When you bought the UFH system who designed the system? Are you using Heatmiser thermostats?



Muncher said:
To do mine I imagine around £5-6k if you wanted all the electrics done excluding supply of the lights themselves as there is quite a lot to do.

The UFH depends on exactly what youre getting really as the costs vary, I'm paying about £4.4k for the a system with 16 zones, trays for upstairs, 15 network thermostats, half with floor sensors, central touch screen control panel, 1200m of pipe and all the other necessary bits. That covers around 210sqm. My screeder is £500 and then another £700 or so for sand and cement plus a large mixer hire.

Muncher

Original Poster:

9,506 posts

134 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
I can't see how it could ever cost that unless the house was enormous!

I got mine from a company called U-Heat near me, they were by far the cheapest and the service has been very good. The spreader plates I don't think are actually that expensive, something like £3 each. All of my thermostats are Heatmiser ones.

Muncher

Original Poster:

9,506 posts

134 months

[news] 
Saturday 13th October 2012 quote quote all
Another update smile

Screed starting to go down, UFH all plumbed in.





The back part done after 1 day, 140 barrow loads, 18 tonnes of sand and 702 bas of cement required!











Soakaway dug this morning



Lined to keep the sand out and allow the water through.



Filled with broken bricks and covered





Completely covered



Just these two left to connect up



The soakaway is so large we could discharge water from a garage into it as well should we need to.

Next step is to wait for the windows to be delivered and put up some stud walls in the meantime.

singlecoil

19,972 posts

131 months

[news] 
Saturday 13th October 2012 quote quote all
I'm assuming you dug that soakaway with a digger, and those guys are just tidying it up?

Muncher

Original Poster:

9,506 posts

134 months

[news] 
Saturday 13th October 2012 quote quote all
singlecoil said:
I'm assuming you dug that soakaway with a digger, and those guys are just tidying it up?
Of course! Would have taken days by hand! I only had to pay for the morning as I arranged for them to do a job round a mate's house afterwards so the digger and 2 men cost me just £60 smile


69 coupe

1,746 posts

96 months

[news] 
Saturday 13th October 2012 quote quote all
Looking real good Muncher, you could almost fit the tv on the wall smile

Out of interest whats the screed sand cement ratio looks a dry mix & how do you get the screed to level over such a large area? set levels to fill too, then powerfloat???

Edited by 69 coupe on Saturday 13th October 21:41

Muncher

Original Poster:

9,506 posts

134 months

[news] 
Saturday 13th October 2012 quote quote all
It's a 4:1 mix with fibres added. It's mixed quite dry and troweled by hand, just with the aid of a spirit level, it's pretty impressive how they do it, one mixed it, the other spread it.

Tuna

4,738 posts

169 months

[news] 
Saturday 13th October 2012 quote quote all
Looking great, that's a bit of a step up to the front door though?

We had a liquid screed in our place, good to work on in a few days and minimal thickness to keep the system responsive. I can't recommend underfloor heating enough for a comfortable home.

Muncher

Original Poster:

9,506 posts

134 months

[news] 
Saturday 13th October 2012 quote quote all
Tuna said:
Looking great, that's a bit of a step up to the front door though?

We had a liquid screed in our place, good to work on in a few days and minimal thickness to keep the system responsive. I can't recommend underfloor heating enough for a comfortable home.
The front door is being replaced mainly because the new floor level is lower than the old one.

We got quoted for a pumped screed but it was twice as expensive as a cement screed and the drying time was extremely long. Over around 200sqm it would become cost effective but ours is around half that.

Muncher

Original Poster:

9,506 posts

134 months

[news] 
Tuesday 16th October 2012 quote quote all
What size internal doors should we be going for? The opening in the brick are 900mm approximately and the ones for the jack and Jill ensuite are 800mm wide?

Also does anyone have any suggestions for a smart bowl style sink and tap for the front ensuite? We've been lookin at glass bowls but can't quite decide on one, nor what it should sit on, perhaps a nice piece of laminate worktop? It needs to be around 20-30mm thick.

It's very tricky getting the waste and feeds to it as they need to go in the cavity, but I think that will give the best result. It's the third bathroom so in all likelihood won't get used at all often but we want something that looks a little funky without spending much money.

skintemma

409 posts

27 months

[news] 
Tuesday 16th October 2012 quote quote all
Hey Muncher, hope the lung is a bit better now. Can't help re the basins, I'm afraid - I'm going throght the same bathroom trauma.
Quick question though, how do the upstairs UFH plates work? I'm waiting to hear back from the installer. Apparently, Building regs don't like you notching the joists anymore - we were thinking of adding battens to joist and cutting them instead. It'll raise the floor height upstairs but we have the headroom so it's not a worry. I have seen those routed plates that sit on the floor but our stuff is the aluminium plate system - do they sit under the floor, then insulation underneath that, then downstairs plasterboarding?
All looking good, when do you reckon you'll be in by? And have you got a kitchen yet?
E

Cheib

8,926 posts

60 months

[news] 
Tuesday 16th October 2012 quote quote all
Muncher said:
Also does anyone have any suggestions for a smart bowl style sink and tap for the front ensuite? We've been lookin at glass bowls but can't quite decide on one, nor what it should sit on, perhaps a nice piece of laminate worktop? It needs to be around 20-30mm thick.
We have this one in our en suits

http://www.archiproducts.com/en/products/5406/coun...

Can't remember how much it was as it was 6 years ago.....you can pair any tap with it I think.

skintemma

409 posts

27 months

[news] 
Tuesday 16th October 2012 quote quote all
Jeeez, thanks for the link above! Nice. There goes the soft furnishings budget wink

Cheib

8,926 posts

60 months

[news] 
Tuesday 16th October 2012 quote quote all
skintemma said:
Jeeez, thanks for the link above! Nice. There goes the soft furnishings budget wink
Nightmare isn't it. Very hard to draw the line.....when we refurbished our place I was keen that things we used had a quality feel to them. i.e. taps, door handles, the doors (proper doors have weight, light switches, locks etc

Sounds nerdy I know but it would have bugged the st out of me if we'd ended up with cheap fittings.

Muncher

Original Poster:

9,506 posts

134 months

[news] 
Wednesday 17th October 2012 quote quote all
Hi Emma, I got the all clear from the doctors today regarding the lung, it is now just a case of wait and hope it doesn't happen again.

Regarding the spreader plates they are stapled to the top of the joists, with some mineral wool insulation beneath them and then the downstairs ceiling. With engineered joists which you can not notch the pipe has to be fed through the gaps in the webbing at each end to cross over which is a big pain. With normal joists the idea is to notch them, however where and how deep you notch them is down to your structural engineer really. We are at the very limit of being able to do it safely.

If given the choice I would go for the insulated tray system sitting on top of your joists as I suspect it will be more effective and certainly much easier to lay. The only consideration is how much headroom do you have to lose and how much extra those trays cost.

We haven't got a kitchen yet, we have a few ideas but that's been put on the back burner really until we have the windows and doors in. As for a move in date, maybe next July but it will take as long as it takes, there isn't a big rush.

Edited by Muncher on Wednesday 17th October 08:26

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