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Billions of habital planets in Milky Way

Billions of habital planets in Milky Way

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Derek Smith

Original Poster:

25,321 posts

156 months

Wednesday 28th March 2012
quotequote all
Under the heading of billions of habitable planets found in Milky Way:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/space/9170683/N...

For a start red dwarfs aren't, as mentioned in the article, the most stable of stars. I'm not sure how a planet in the 'goldilocks’ zone', which would have to be quite close given its output, would fare under the bombardment of X rays and 'stuff'.

Perhaps troglodytes? The Time Machine anyone?

The most populous type of star might be the most popular for life. Interesting.

There was a report some time ago of Jupiter-sized planets around a number of red dwarfs, and multiple planets around some, but this, with the emphasis on earth-sized planets, seems new.

Ayahuasca

19,518 posts

187 months

Wednesday 28th March 2012
quotequote all
Derek Smith said:
I'm not sure how a planet in the 'goldilocks’ zone', which would have to be quite close given its output, would fare under the bombardment of X rays and 'stuff'.
They would have fun, fun, fun, in the sun, sun, sun.

Simpo Two

65,937 posts

173 months

Wednesday 28th March 2012
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Or life there has evolved to use 'X-rays and stuff' as an energy source...

Graebob

2,171 posts

115 months

Thursday 29th March 2012
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habitable

hehe

BarnatosGhost

10,290 posts

161 months

Thursday 29th March 2012
quotequote all
Once anything has been proven to exist, as life has, the chances of it only existing once, in one place, are very low indeed.
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98elise

8,470 posts

69 months

Thursday 29th March 2012
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BarnatosGhost said:
Once anything has been proven to exist, as life has, the chances of it only existing once, in one place, are very low indeed.
Agreed. Life exists here, so how could it not occur elsewhere, given planets and stars exist in numbers most people can't even comprehend.

Even on earth live exists in the most unusual (for us) of circumstances.

Max_Torque

10,237 posts

125 months

Thursday 29th March 2012
quotequote all
Billions, and Billions, and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions,and Billions..........


/Dr Brian Cox


;-)

Derek Smith

Original Poster:

25,321 posts

156 months

Thursday 29th March 2012
quotequote all
98elise said:
Even on earth live exists in the most unusual (for us) of circumstances.
Hull for instance.

Simpo Two

65,937 posts

173 months

Thursday 29th March 2012
quotequote all
Hmm, now let me think...

I reckon if:

N = the number of civilizations in our galaxy with which communication might be possible;
R* = the average rate of star formation per year in our galaxy
fp = the fraction of those stars that have planets
ne = the average number of planets that can potentially support life per star that has planets
fℓ = the fraction of the above that actually go on to develop life at some point
fi = the fraction of the above that actually go on to develop intelligent life
fc = the fraction of civilizations that develop a technology that releases detectable signs of their existence into space
L = the length of time for which such civilizations release detectable signals into space

Then you get:



Sorted!




ETA: Oh damn, beaten to it...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drake_equation

Edited by Simpo Two on Thursday 29th March 23:34

Justin Cyder

12,624 posts

57 months

Thursday 29th March 2012
quotequote all
BarnatosGhost said:
Once anything has been proven to exist, as life has, the chances of it only existing once, in one place, are very low indeed.
^^^This. Given the The number of stars in the galaxy, never mind the universe, it would be astounding if the place wasn't teeming with life. Either it is or it isn't. Either way it's profound. + the drake equation hehe

Astronut

103 posts

87 months

Thursday 29th March 2012
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It has been decided (and this is absolutely true) that, in the event of contact being made with another civilisation, the word 'alien' MUST NOT be used as it is offensive, implying that they are being categorised as a life-form that is living in the wrong environment. They must be referred to as EBE's - Exo-Biological Entities...

Brussels can even wind its red feckin' tape around the necks of people from other stellar systems!

Simpo Two

65,937 posts

173 months

Friday 30th March 2012
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I have a horrible feeling that may be true... (though an alien is only an alien when not in its own environment, being otherwise native)

How about 'Differently Humaned'?

steviejasp

1,525 posts

73 months

Friday 30th March 2012
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Humanely challenged is probably less offensive to those green bds

Zaxxon

4,057 posts

68 months

Friday 30th March 2012
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If a life form has developed the technology to travel the distances required to reach us then I think Brussels can go screw itself as we will be referring to any alien as 'Master'.

Derek Smith

Original Poster:

25,321 posts

156 months

Friday 30th March 2012
quotequote all
Probably best if we don't find any. Think of those extra religions.

cal216610

7,820 posts

78 months

Friday 30th March 2012
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Derek Smith said:
Probably best if we don't find any. Think of those extra religions.
I started to think about that, then i got a headache.

Zaxxon

4,057 posts

68 months

Friday 30th March 2012
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Doubt it, I would think that they have evolved beyond the need for superstitions etc.

Simpo Two

65,937 posts

173 months

Friday 30th March 2012
quotequote all
Or if the alien is green with six arms, we'll know that the Buddhists were right and everyone else was wrong...

Mr Gear

9,416 posts

98 months

Friday 30th March 2012
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BarnatosGhost said:
Once anything has been proven to exist, as life has, the chances of it only existing once, in one place, are very low indeed.
But... It has evolved here only once in the planet's entire history. We all have one common ancestor. Life has only sprouted once.

That is what I am led to believe.

Now, although that makes it very special, it doesn't of course make it impossible for it to start from scratch again somewhere else in the universe.

Derek Smith

Original Poster:

25,321 posts

156 months

Friday 30th March 2012
quotequote all
Mr Gear said:
But... It has evolved here only once in the planet's entire history. We all have one common ancestor. Life has only sprouted once.

That is what I am led to believe.

Now, although that makes it very special, it doesn't of course make it impossible for it to start from scratch again somewhere else in the universe.
But couldn't we have had another common ancestor if certain things had occurred. If the Siberian traps had been just a little more volatile we might have had to start from scratch again. Also, did life start just in the one place or did it start in a number and the best one dominated all the others?