Login | Register
SearchMy Stuff
My ProfileMy PreferencesMy Mates RSS Feed
1
3 4 ... 11 12
Reply to Topic
Author Discussion

Mazdarese

18,961 posts

74 months

[news] 
Monday 22nd August 2011 quote quote all
American Psycho.

HowMuchLonger

2,819 posts

80 months

[news] 
Monday 22nd August 2011 quote quote all
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged/The Fountainhead

drivin_me_nuts

16,052 posts

98 months

[news] 
Monday 22nd August 2011 quote quote all
The Stonor Eagles. By William Horwood and if it's a beautifully interwoven set of threads that make for a powerful story.


JonnyFive

27,706 posts

76 months

[news] 
Monday 22nd August 2011 quote quote all
Shaw Tarse said:
Was mentioned in the other thread, but Sniper One by Dan Mills.
Yep, this is also my favourite book.

Edited by JonnyFive on Monday 22 August 17:14

RDMcG

8,864 posts

94 months

[news] 
Monday 22nd August 2011 quote quote all
The Great Gatsby

Enduring Love, ( Ian McEwan)
Advertisement

Highrisedrifter

754 posts

41 months

[news] 
Monday 22nd August 2011 quote quote all
Mazdarese said:
American Psycho.
This is either at the top or in second place, depending on how my mood takes me.

The other book in that equation is 'Brave New World' by Aldous Huxley.

indi pearl

293 posts

84 months

[news] 
Monday 22nd August 2011 quote quote all
The Godwhale by T.J. Bass

"A thundering surf drowned the forlorn screams of land locked Rorqual Maru.Brine-tossed grains of olivine and calcite buried her left eye, blocking her view of the sky...As the eyelid of sand darkened her world, Rorqual wept over her irretrievable, wasted years. She was a Harvester without a crop-a plankton rake abondoned by Earth society when the seas died."
Well over 600' long, Rorqual was a cyborg, part whale, part ship, and a marvellously complex combination of biology and mechanics. She had been built to serve Man, and yearned for his return and the feel of bare feet on her decks.
Then, after centuries, the miracle happened. The sea grew life again-and Rorquel began her long ,slow search. But mankind had forgtten all about Rorquel and her kind.......

mattviatura

2,996 posts

87 months

[news] 
Monday 22nd August 2011 quote quote all
Anything by Damon Runyon has me in stitches. Can't really specify a favourite book though, too many genres.

GetCarter

19,681 posts

166 months

[news] 
Monday 22nd August 2011 quote quote all
Doors of perception: Aldous Huxley.

Changed my life.

Tuscan Rat

3,267 posts

110 months

[news] 
Monday 22nd August 2011 quote quote all
Apache by Ed Macy.

Read the first chapter here

http://www.edmacy.com/#/the-book/


Mazdarese

18,961 posts

74 months

[news] 
Monday 22nd August 2011 quote quote all
GetCarter said:
Doors of perception: Aldous Huxley.

Changed my life.
Just added to my Kindle. Hope it's good. smile

jeff m

3,866 posts

145 months

[news] 
Monday 22nd August 2011 quote quote all
Not sure if this was the best, but I doubt it's going to on this list if I don't put itsmile

"A Day in the Life of A Soviet Worker" Andrew Smith (non fiction)

American Socialist/Marxist/Union guy is convinced the Russian way of life is better than that of the American worker.
So he ups sticks and heads east.

Edit I did a search...appears it is called "I was a Soviet Worker"..., possible I confused it with the Soltzy one of a similar title.

Edited by jeff m on Monday 22 August 17:36

Getragdogleg

4,628 posts

70 months

[news] 
Monday 22nd August 2011 quote quote all
I recently re-read Defying Hitler by Sebastian Haffner which is a book telling of the social reasons and reception to the rise of Hitler in post 1st war Germany, the national pride/shame mix and the way it helped Hitler to get power. Incredible book, very hard to get hold of a copy unless you go via a second hand seller, unless it has been re printed.

For pure escapism I read the Millenium Trilogy (Girl with the dragon tattoo, The Girl who played with fire and the Girl who kicked the Hornets Nest) Excellent set of books, well written even though they are translations, clever pacy interlaced story over the 3 books, I can see who lots of folk took them on holiday with them and who they are being made into Films.

GetCarter

19,681 posts

166 months

[news] 
Monday 22nd August 2011 quote quote all
Mazdarese said:
GetCarter said:
Doors of perception: Aldous Huxley.

Changed my life.
Just added to my Kindle. Hope it's good. smile
You probably need to be on drugs. (Just a heads up)

jt racing

521 posts

61 months

[news] 
Monday 22nd August 2011 quote quote all
Lived bravo two zero. Read it loads of times and its still great. I liked immediate action too.
As a teenager I loved a book called 'the Wheatstoe pond'. Can't remember for the life of me who by, I think Roger or Robert someone but I got it for a car journey across the uk and never once pit it down.

krusty

2,392 posts

136 months

[news] 
Monday 22nd August 2011 quote quote all
Ken Follet's - Pillars of the Earth & A world without End
If you saw the mini series of Pillars, ignore it. Not a patch on the book.

I'm also a big fan of Jo Nesbo's Harry Hole series.

Dirty Frank

598 posts

41 months

[news] 
Monday 22nd August 2011 quote quote all
Child 44 - Tom Rob Smith.

Just gone back to it after the third and final part of the trilogy has been released, and its still gripping.

Dirty Frank

598 posts

41 months

[news] 
Monday 22nd August 2011 quote quote all
krusty said:
I'm also a big fan of Jo Nesbo's Harry Hole series.
Ive been put off those because the first two dont have an english translation, do you miss anything by not reading them?

Jasandjules

51,851 posts

116 months

[news] 
Monday 22nd August 2011 quote quote all
If you liked Chickenhaw you'd like "If I die in a Combat Zone".

If you liked Bravo 2 Zero then I think you'd also like Immediate Action.

If Tomorrow Comes is a good book, read it quite a few times.

Insomnia by King is good (well, the ending is not so much but the idea is good). 48 by Herbert. Imagica by Barker. So, so many books.


swiftpete

1,768 posts

80 months

[news] 
Monday 22nd August 2011 quote quote all
Papillon is an excellent book. My friend and I read it about 10 years ago and still quote lines from it to each other. Have you read the sequel Banco? It's more of the same, but also very entertaining.
I thought about this for a while and I think the books that really stand out are the foundation trilogy from isaac asimov. They're the books that made me realise I liked sci fi and are awesome. I haven't read them for years but I will re read them. You ought to give them a go if you haven't read them.
1
3 4 ... 11 12
Reply to Topic