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Ace-T

Original Poster:

5,763 posts

141 months

[news] 
Tuesday 21st August 2012 quote quote all
Based on this exchange


Eric Mc said:
MorrisCRX said:
Eric Mc said:
"Romeo and Juliet" tripe?
my opinion and it's valid. whistle

Out of all of his works, that is the one that we where force fed and it is the one I can't stand.
Of course you are entitled to your opinion - but I am pretty sure you will find it is a minority opinion.

Any play about inter-gang warfare is pretty relevant and interesting in any era. Perhaps you weren't taught to appreciate the finer points of Shakespeare. Did you study any other of his plays?
We studied Romeo and Juliet and later Hamlet - and I loved them both, particularly Hamlet.

But, as I said, Shakepeare wrote dramas and poetry, not books, so probably not a relevant discussion in this thread.
What are your thoughts on the Bard? Were you too young to appreciate the finer points at school, or is it a load of irrelevant mumblings even now?

My view? Unless you saw his plays on a stage, it meant nothing. Once seen how it was supposed to be shown, it transformed the words into something pretty spectacular.

Trace smile

sammyboy

317 posts

95 months

[news] 
Tuesday 21st August 2012 quote quote all
Eric Mc said:
"Romeo and Juliet" tripe?
The lady doth protest too much

Ace-T

Original Poster:

5,763 posts

141 months

[news] 
Tuesday 21st August 2012 quote quote all
sammyboy said:
The lady doth protest too much
To be fair to Eric, he was quoting someone else! hehe

Trace smile

LordGrover

22,672 posts

98 months

[news] 
Tuesday 21st August 2012 quote quote all
When studied at school I found literature in general a dry subject, though still scraped a C.

When I re-read Twelfth Night decades later I really enjoyed it, as I gradually remembered my lessons of yesteryear. Still struggled with a few others I tried at the time though as I had no one to 'translate' them for me. If I could've been bothered to read a guide or two I would probably enjoy more Shakespeare.
I enjoy 'classic' novels though, especially Dickens and Hardy and similar.

sammyboy

317 posts

95 months

[news] 
Tuesday 21st August 2012 quote quote all
Ace-T said:
sammyboy said:
The lady doth protest too much
To be fair to Eric, he was quoting someone else! hehe

Trace smile
I just wanted to get a shakespeare quote somewhere in the thread really.
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Paul Dishman

2,361 posts

123 months

[news] 
Tuesday 21st August 2012 quote quote all
I'd rather go and watch Shakespeare than read it. I've seen some brilliant productions- David Tennant as Hamlet, Patrick Stewart as Shylock in The Merchant of Venice both at the RSC, Rory Kinnear as Hamlet and the Propellor Theatre production of Henry V both in Plymouth, and all brought the words off the page and into life

davepoth

23,354 posts

85 months

[news] 
Tuesday 21st August 2012 quote quote all
Paul Dishman said:
I'd rather go and watch Shakespeare than read it. I've seen some brilliant productions- David Tennant as Hamlet, Patrick Stewart as Shylock in The Merchant of Venice both at the RSC, Rory Kinnear as Hamlet and the Propellor Theatre production of Henry V both in Plymouth, and all brought the words off the page and into life
Very much that. Shakespeare never wrote the plays to be read as a book.

Eric Mc

77,267 posts

151 months

[news] 
Wednesday 22nd August 2012 quote quote all
Absolutely - it needs to be performed to be appreciated.

BBC's recent redoings of a number of Shakespeare's plays were absolutely stunning in some cases (Richard II in particular).
As a 13 to 18, I didn't MIND the plays we were studying - but I could easily understand other young lads (it was an all boys' school) being put off by the language. I learned to appreciate the plays in later life and have now seen quite a few of them performed.

DanDC5

8,935 posts

53 months

[news] 
Wednesday 22nd August 2012 quote quote all
After being made to read a couple of different plays at school I quickly lost all interest to be honest. Wouldn't say he was crap to be honest, the fact his works are still performed/appreciated/studied today would suggest the true greatness of his work. But it still fails to interest me enough to want to read them.

This may just say more about me to be honest.

MorrisCRX

620 posts

79 months

[news] 
Wednesday 22nd August 2012 quote quote all
It's the force feeding thats done in schools that ruins it for those like my self.

I've seen the tempest performed and I'm sure the rest are great in the medium they're supposed to be presented. (not sure that sentence made sense..)

Printed, they're of no interest to me.


plasticpig

9,293 posts

111 months

[news] 
Wednesday 22nd August 2012 quote quote all
Great. My introduction to Shakespeare was Macbeth. Probably rhe best play to introduce a twelve year old kid to the Bard. Murders, witches, ghosts, battles, treason and a high body count. Its also quite short which is a plus. It's still my favorite play.






ali_kat

26,715 posts

107 months

[news] 
Wednesday 22nd August 2012 quote quote all
MorrisCRX said:
It's the force feeding thats done in schools that ruins it for those like my self.

I've seen the tempest performed and I'm sure the rest are great in the medium they're supposed to be presented. (not sure that sentence made sense..)

Printed, they're of no interest to me.
yes Exactly this biggrin

I've seen most of them performed now at the RSC (sometimes living in the sticks has advantages), usually without the 'Stars' in them, but Shakespeare doesn't need 'Stars', it needs actors (not always the same wink) biggrin

The Taming of the Shrew is my favourite biggrin

So many of his plays are the basis for 'modern' films & very few have any idea!


Eric Mc

77,267 posts

151 months

[news] 
Wednesday 22nd August 2012 quote quote all
I like "The Taming of the Shrew" too. It's almost a womens' lib tale - although she knuckles down in the end.

I also like the musical loosely based on it, "Kiss Me Kate".

Ace-T

Original Poster:

5,763 posts

141 months

[news] 
Wednesday 22nd August 2012 quote quote all
plasticpig said:
Great. My introduction to Shakespeare was Macbeth. Probably rhe best play to introduce a twelve year old kid to the Bard. Murders, witches, ghosts, battles, treason and a high body count. Its also quite short which is a plus. It's still my favorite play.
http://www.derbytheatre.co.uk/performance/macbeth

thumbup

StuStu

1,028 posts

117 months

[news] 
Saturday 25th August 2012 quote quote all
Shakespeare should be heard not read ... A few minutes in and the language becomes a joy not a chore ...

HowMuchLonger

2,819 posts

79 months

[news] 
Saturday 25th August 2012 quote quote all
I may be viewed as a plebian but I thought that Baz Lerman's film of R&J was great. The use of the original language was certainly not a barrier/off putting.

Wacky Racer

22,326 posts

133 months

[news] 
Saturday 25th August 2012 quote quote all


2B or not 2B?....That is the question.

Eric Mc

77,267 posts

151 months

[news] 
Sunday 26th August 2012 quote quote all
Definitely not.

ClaphamGT3

4,368 posts

129 months

[news] 
Sunday 26th August 2012 quote quote all
The tragedies are both a little heavy going and, usually, highly contrived. The histories are fascinating to someone who is an avid historian - to get the 16th Century perspective on contemprary and recent history is awesome. The comedies are wonderful - invariably light and frothy with such a richness to the characters and such acute observation of human nature. There is no better way to spend a summer evening than watching an outdoor production of Much Ado or Measure for Measure.

Edited by ClaphamGT3 on Sunday 26th August 20:13

Fishtigua

6,651 posts

81 months

[news] 
Sunday 26th August 2012 quote quote all
Ian McKellen's Richard III in the 1995 film that was set in a sort of 1930's Fascist Dictatorship was brilliant. Even I 'got' it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pjJEXkbeL-o
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