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Author Discussion

LouD86

2,241 posts

39 months

[news] 
Saturday 7th January 2012 quote quote all
Save Ferris said:
Dealers/franchises will obviously have different pay structures, but for me it's a flat rate for a new car, and a % of retained profit on used.

So 'just' selling a car doesn't really pay a geat deal (new in particular) You really earn the money on selling paint protection, GAP insurance, accesories, finance....
Here here!! And you earn the extra on those products in less time!!

Zwolf

24,584 posts

92 months

[news] 
Saturday 7th January 2012 quote quote all
Mattt said:
Is there better commission on add-ons than cars?
It varies between franchises and dealer groups, but usually as far as the salesperson's pocket is concerned, yes. The commission for each add-on can often be a multiple of the commission for the car itself - which is often minimal in the case of new cars.









jbailey93

171 posts

44 months

[news] 
Saturday 7th January 2012 quote quote all
I currently work as a phone salesman and have been considering making the move to cars, would anyone recommend it?

IrrElephant

8,760 posts

46 months

[news] 
Saturday 7th January 2012 quote quote all
jbailey93 said:
I currently work as a phone salesman and have been considering making the move to cars, would anyone recommend it?
I left my cushty managers job at a place that sounds like BonesForPoo to sell cars (for the second time) if you're a hard worker and like to earn more money then go for it.

You're already used to the fickle pay packets I'm sure.

Ari

9,903 posts

101 months

[news] 
Saturday 7th January 2012 quote quote all
cts1975 said:
PigFilth said:
A colleague of mine was a Ford salesman in the 80s - said Ford have a place in Cumbria that looks like an unassuming B&B but is a training centre where sales staff get taught the ways of Ford. He's probably the best salesperson I know but even he said that it was a "certain way" of selling that was employed (i.e. very high pressure). Not sure if it's the same these days.
Ford don' treally have input into the sales techniques used - its normally down to the managment of the motor group. If he was a Ford salesman in the 80's and went training ask him if he know Les Nicol?
They certainly do, they have a (fairly impressive) purpose built centre on the edge of Loughborough University called Henry Ford College where all Ford salesmen are obliged to attend two main events (where they're introduced to and taught about new products) plus one or two further days being taught about specific topics, anything from finance to cold calling techniques.

The main theme is Ford indoctrination, where they try to persuade Ford sales people things like, because they've started offering Nappa leather as an option on Mondeo's, they're now a match for Audi in interior ambience and quality (seriously!)

They're generally good fun though. On one occasion they were trying to persuade sales people that the Fiesta was a far better drivers car than the VW Polo, so they rented a load of Polos, got a load of Fiestas, and got the sales staff to drive them one after the other on a brisk lap of Donnington (in a line behind a pace car, no overtaking) swapping between the two makes of car. Only they clearly weren't too confident, the Fiestas were top of the (sporty) range Zetec S spec, which have stiffened suspension, 17 inch fat alloys, sports seats, etc etc and were fitted with 1.6 litre turbo diesels. The Polos? Base model steel rimmed three cylinder 950cc, each andevery one of them. biggrin

Car football was cool though, Fiat 500 vs Ford Ka (to "prove" how much more agile the Fords were). Punt the big inflatable ball in a circle round a big inflatable car then into a goal against a target time. Great fun.

On one occasion they had the place dressed up with Union Jack flags and lots of examples of great British products, to make us feel proud of working for a British company (that was actually American and makes cars everywhere except Britain). Could never quite get that one.

Usually some cool cars there though. Stuff like one of the very last Brooklands Capris, a Model T, a Ford GT, concept cars, etc.

Interested to hear what goes on at other manufacturers brainwashing sessions. smile
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MeerGruen

49 posts

33 months

[news] 
Saturday 7th January 2012 quote quote all
How do you get into car sales?

I'm only 17 (18 in a few days) and finished school, have been buying and selling alloys for the last year or so and enjoying the bargaining and dealing with the public and that sense of pride you get when you make an awesome deal.

Would love to get into car sales. smile

Zwolf

24,584 posts

92 months

[news] 
Saturday 7th January 2012 quote quote all
MeerGruen said:
How do you get into car sales?
Blag your way in hehe

There are no formal qualifications beyond demonstrating that you can speak decent English, communicate confidently and well and are reasonably numerate.

Have a look at positions advertised locally, but not the ones that require a "proven track record" as these will assume and require you to be proficient from day one, companies happy to train you from the ground up will mention it or leave that bit out.

Start off looking at local volume brands as most premium brands will require previous experience. Provided you come across well in person in interviews and are likeable and engaging, then someone will take you on, usually for a three month trial period to see how you do.

It's a job that you can only really learn by doing the job and getting used to and comfortable dealing with a wide variety of people and being adaptable. Hours are long, basic salaries are miserable. You'll most likely start with a volumem brand on £10-12kpa with on target earnings of £30-35k. You'll probably earn £25-30k in your first year (less than that and they'll have got shot of you six months in) and increase that by £5k pa up to £40-45k and if you're exceptional in time, closer to £60k+

MeerGruen

49 posts

33 months

[news] 
Saturday 7th January 2012 quote quote all
Zwolf said:
MeerGruen said:
How do you get into car sales?
Blag your way in hehe

There are no formal qualifications beyond demonstrating that you can speak decent English, communicate confidently and well and are reasonably numerate.

Have a look at positions advertised locally, but not the ones that require a "proven track record" as these will assume and require you to be proficient from day one, companies happy to train you from the ground up will mention it or leave that bit out.

Start off looking at local volume brands as most premium brands will require previous experience. Provided you come across well in person in interviews and are likeable and engaging, then someone will take you on, usually for a three month trial period to see how you do.

It's a job that you can only really learn by doing the job and getting used to and comfortable dealing with a wide variety of people and being adaptable. Hours are long, basic salaries are miserable. You'll most likely start with a volumem brand on £10-12kpa with on target earnings of £30-35k. You'll probably earn £25-30k in your first year (less than that and they'll have got shot of you six months in) and increase that by £5k pa up to £40-45k and if you're exceptional in time, closer to £60k+
Sounds good, Thanks smile

There is a good few local dealers to me, But they are big names, Ford/Nissan/Toyota and small time dealers are mostly a one man operation.


IrrElephant

8,760 posts

46 months

[news] 
Saturday 7th January 2012 quote quote all
As above really, Zwolf nailed it.

If I'm not hitting 35k pa, I'm doing something wrong. Get in at a young age. Don't think It's just about selling, you need to know about customer retention, customer service and admin, not just knocking out units all day long.

You need to be able to cover all bases, being a one trick pony and shafting your colleagues and not giving a stuff about customers only carries you so far before management start looking at you a bit closer and when customers throw st, it sticks.

You have to be prepared to do whatever it takes to keep people happy. I walked someone's dog the other day while they deliberated on buying a car, but they bought it.

xrv

491 posts

101 months

[news] 
Saturday 7th January 2012 quote quote all
Ari said:
On one occasion they were trying to persuade sales people that the Fiesta was a far better drivers car than the VW Polo, so they rented a load of Polos, got a load of Fiestas, and got the sales staff to drive them one after the other on a brisk lap of Donnington (in a line behind a pace car, no overtaking) swapping between the two makes of car. Only they clearly weren't too confident, the Fiestas were top of the (sporty) range Zetec S spec, which have stiffened suspension, 17 inch fat alloys, sports seats, etc etc and were fitted with 1.6 litre turbo diesels. The Polos? Base model steel rimmed three cylinder 950cc, each andevery one of them.
I remember that day. It really was one of the most pitiful things I've ever seen.

MeerGruen

49 posts

33 months

[news] 
Saturday 7th January 2012 quote quote all
IrrElephant said:
As above really, Zwolf nailed it.

If I'm not hitting 35k pa, I'm doing something wrong. Get in at a young age. Don't think It's just about selling, you need to know about customer retention, customer service and admin, not just knocking out units all day long.

You need to be able to cover all bases, being a one trick pony and shafting your colleagues and not giving a stuff about customers only carries you so far before management start looking at you a bit closer and when customers throw st, it sticks.

You have to be prepared to do whatever it takes to keep people happy. I walked someone's dog the other day while they deliberated on buying a car, but they bought it.
Thank You smile

I know how to sell and keep the customer happy... It's just when it comes down to the likes of how finance works I don't have a clue about that. Would a dealer provide the training or do I have to do courses?

Cheers

T5R+

794 posts

95 months

[news] 
Saturday 7th January 2012 quote quote all
lazyitus said:
Back in the day... scratchchin

When I was selling vans, we had a customer from hell. So obnoxious.......

Imagine my utter, utter, UTTER elation as he arrived at our bodyshop a few days after delivery with about 8 screws drilled from inside out, straight through his plylining attempt and out through the side of the van.

Have that, you bd awkward tosser. smile
clap

Can you gents/ladies drop a few more of these types of stories into the thread.

Zwolf

24,584 posts

92 months

[news] 
Saturday 7th January 2012 quote quote all
MeerGruen said:
There is a good few local dealers to me, But they are big names, Ford/Nissan/Toyota and small time dealers are mostly a one man operation.
The brands you mention would all be ideal places to start out, so either keep an eye out for local ads, however - most motor trade recruitment is done via agencies. So knock yourself up a CV and start talking to them about your ambitions and abilities and they will make use of their contacts to find somewhere that will give you a go.

It won't be immediate, but stick with it and someone will give you a chance sooner or later. Then work your arse off to keep it. Even ten years and thousands of deals later, you're still only as good as your last month - or last quarter if they're generous and there are always people trying to get in beneath you, hence it's a very competitive and at times high pressure environment. Which is why it pays well.

Sales managers also like "self-starters" too, so you've nothing to lose by getting a haircut, getting a respectable suit and tie and going into places to hand in a CV purely speculatively. They may not have a position immediately, but if they've half a brain when they do, they'll dust off the little pile of CVs from people motivated enough to take the chance previously.

Be prepared for a lot of rejection at that stage though, it'll prepare you well for selling though as between a half and two-thirds of all the people you ever deal with, will never buy a car from you - more like 80-90% whilst you're learning the ropes. It's one of those business where you learn much more from your failures than you do from your successes.

MeerGruen

49 posts

33 months

[news] 
Saturday 7th January 2012 quote quote all
Zwolf said:
The brands you mention would all be ideal places to start out, so either keep an eye out for local ads, however - most motor trade recruitment is done via agencies. So knock yourself up a CV and start talking to them about your ambitions and abilities and they will make use of their contacts to find somewhere that will give you a go.

It won't be immediate, but stick with it and someone will give you a chance sooner or later. Then work your arse off to keep it. Even ten years and thousands of deals later, you're still only as good as your last month - or last quarter if they're generous and there are always people trying to get in beneath you, hence it's a very competitive and at times high pressure environment. Which is why it pays well.

Sales managers also like "self-starters" too, so you've nothing to lose by getting a haircut, getting a respectable suit and tie and going into places to hand in a CV purely speculatively. They may not have a position immediately, but if they've half a brain when they do, they'll dust off the little pile of CVs from people motivated enough to take the chance previously.

Be prepared for a lot of rejection at that stage though, it'll prepare you well for selling though as between a half and two-thirds of all the people you ever deal with, will never buy a car from you - more like 80-90% whilst you're learning the ropes. It's one of those business where you learn much more from your failures than you do from your successes.
Thank You smile

It's something I would love to do, feel comfortable and enjoy doing so it's ideal for me, I know it takes work but I'm willing to put the time in.

Hopefully I will get somewhere eventually,

Thanks Again smile

IrrElephant

8,760 posts

46 months

[news] 
Saturday 7th January 2012 quote quote all
MeerGruen said:
Thank You smile

I know how to sell and keep the customer happy... It's just when it comes down to the likes of how finance works I don't have a clue about that. Would a dealer provide the training or do I have to do courses?

Cheers
Depending on who you work for, you may have to do training courses etc. A lot of big dealerships will have business managers and the like that will get involved and help with finance packages etc.

I do all ny own deal building and finance quotes (unless I know we have a particular model to shift, or a particular target to hit) then I will ask my manager to guide me.

You need to be good at appraising cars, look at small details and be able to listen to people.

One chap I know doesn't listen to his customers, just does a fake laugh and acknowledges that they've said something but doesn't actually care what's been said. All well and good until you need to remember something they've said :P


T66ORA

3,220 posts

143 months

[news] 
Saturday 7th January 2012 quote quote all
Working for Ford in the 80`s we went to a training complex call "Bower House" any one else remember that place. The Pendle sales system was all the rage back then.
That was high pressure sales, most decent salespeople adapted some of that system to suit there individual style.I still used, and taught some of the "closing" techniques 20 years on.

When i managed a medium sized used car supermarket for Inchcape, if we didn`t do 50/60 in a weekend it was a bad `un, they were my favourite years,Used cars, very high volume, small margins, decent finance and warranty pen, happy daysbiggrin

Zwolf

24,584 posts

92 months

[news] 
Saturday 7th January 2012 quote quote all
T66ORA said:
Pendle
It's funny you know. Every single sales training/refresher course I've ever attended (started out in 1999) has used that as an exemplar of how NOT to sell cars as it often has a severely deleterious effect upon CSI and doesn't generate any more business than the more modern consultative approach. hehe

Ari

9,903 posts

101 months

[news] 
Saturday 7th January 2012 quote quote all
Anybody interested in car sales, and particularly in getting into car sales, might find this an interesting read.

It's a blog written by someone with zero car sales experience and in a sales management role suddenly made redundant in the midst of the 2009 financial crash and figuring that car sales might be the way to make a living.

The story is of the realisation of this and how to break into car sales at the worst possible time and with no experience.

http://charliecroker.wordpress.com/2009/07/08/the-...

Click the link at the top right of each page to mover on (so on the first page that the link takes you to, click "Hitting the ground running" to move on.

T66ORA

3,220 posts

143 months

[news] 
Saturday 7th January 2012 quote quote all
Would have to agree with you, but some things like "the road to sale" and the closing techniques, still have a relevance in used car sales even today.I can imagine the replies from "George and Alice" on the csi/csp questionnaires thoughhehe

T66ORA

3,220 posts

143 months

[news] 
Saturday 7th January 2012 quote quote all
yikes Just did a google, Pendle lives yikes Can you imagine a PH car sales "expert" coming across one of there salesmen? that would be a 30 page thread on how they would have dealt with him. hehe
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