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Broken down on motorway - charged for the privilege?

Broken down on motorway - charged for the privilege?

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saaby93

Original Poster:

17,316 posts

86 months

Sunday 7th October 2012
quotequote all
Beeb reporting some goings on here ( or a plug for their programme later)
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-19833237

Any PHers received a bill?

whatmoretyres

44 posts

113 months

Sunday 7th October 2012
quotequote all
Not quite the same thing, but I clipped a road sign a while ago. Single post holding a directions sign to a lamp post. Hey, I broke it, gave my details to the council to make a claim (car was a write off anyway).

A few weeks went by and I was copied in on the council invoice - £1580! For one post on the verge? Rung up the council and spoke to the highways department. "oh that's a mistake, we'll re-do it" Came again a week later - £180 rolleyes

blueg33

17,041 posts

132 months

Sunday 7th October 2012
quotequote all
I hit a barrier due to a slippery substannce on the road (this was the police comment, Ithought something had broken on the rear suspension, straight line at circa 40mph accelerating gently and wham 360 spin into barrier), I got a bill for the barrier of about £2500 on top of the £5k repair cost to the car

xRIEx

7,312 posts

56 months

Sunday 7th October 2012
quotequote all
BBC said:
Sheila Kaur-Patel, who works as a BBC production manager, was shocked when she received an invoice for £3,000 for damage she had allegedly caused during a motorway incident.

She said: "When the bill arrived, I was devastated. The damages or so-called 'maintenance fees' are worth more than my car."
That's why you take are legally required to take out third party insurance.

BBC said:
A breakdown of the bill lists items such as a 7.5 tonne tipper hire, repairs to rails and £1,830.91 for the closure of the hard shoulder.

But Sheila insists she has no idea where the idea that any damage was caused has come from. She never saw the tipper or anyone from the company.
Why the fk would she see the tipper? Does she think they think she hit it, not that is was required to go and do the repairs after she hit the barrier? Or did she drive up and down the motorway to check that they were doing the repairs?


£1800 for closing the hard shoulder is a pisstake though.

LC2

241 posts

81 months

Sunday 7th October 2012
quotequote all
Seems that it's now cheaper to crash on 'The Ring' wink
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saaby93

Original Poster:

17,316 posts

86 months

Sunday 7th October 2012
quotequote all
xRIEx said:
BBC said:
Sheila Kaur-Patel, who works as a BBC production manager, was shocked
Missed that
I hope this isnt a BBC creates it's own story story

Deva Link

26,934 posts

153 months

Sunday 7th October 2012
quotequote all
I suppose generally it's going to be an insurance paying the bill and the sender probably knows there's going to be an argument so they present a massive bill and then settle for a bit less.

I love the comment about clearing up an oil spill in 5 mins for £12.50 - just shows some people have absolutely no idea about the costs involved in running a business.

xRIEx

7,312 posts

56 months

Sunday 7th October 2012
quotequote all
saaby93 said:
issed that
I hope this isnt a BBC creates it's own story story
That did occur to me while I was quoting.

cambiker71

432 posts

94 months

Sunday 7th October 2012
quotequote all
A good friend of mine was charged nearly three thousand pounds for knocking over a lamp post, he didn't exactly knock it over but pulled it down with his diesel powered winch whilst trying to bump start the diahatsu fourtrak with a flat battery!

Edited by cambiker71 on Sunday 7th October 10:00

Deva Link

26,934 posts

153 months

Sunday 7th October 2012
quotequote all
Seriously? rofl A video of that would be hilarious.

cambiker71

432 posts

94 months

Sunday 7th October 2012
quotequote all
Deva Link said:
Seriously? rofl A video of that would be hilarious.
This was twenty odd years ago so none unfortunately, he was lucky not to kill himself because it landed right beside him! He reported it to the council as it was right opposite his dads house(where he lived) and thought if he didn't then a neighbour would, they agreed to take a really small amount each month until it was paid off, think he only finished paying a couple of years ago!

tank slapper

7,949 posts

191 months

Sunday 7th October 2012
quotequote all
This seems like opportunistic profiteering. Why are contractors billing members of the public directly? If they are contracted by the local authority or the highways agency, then that is who their bill should go to. To me this is just a part of maintaining the road network. Motorists already pay a huge amount more in various taxes than is spent maintaining the roads, so there certainly should not be any additional bills.

Deva Link

26,934 posts

153 months

Sunday 7th October 2012
quotequote all
tank slapper said:
Why are contractors billing members of the public directly? If they are contracted by the local authority or the highways agency, then that is who their bill should go to.
It's not an unusual situation - it's been the case for a long time that if someone steps in front of your car and you run them over, you get sent a bill for the ambulance.

Citman

298 posts

92 months

Sunday 7th October 2012
quotequote all
My sister had a smash on a quiet residential street just over a year ago when a young lad driving rather too enthusiastically tried to squeeze past her in a gap that wasn't quite big enough. His fault and all dealt with through his insurance, but she was copied in on an invoice for just shy of 100 quid sent by the council to sweep up a very small amount of debris...

saaby93

Original Poster:

17,316 posts

86 months

Sunday 7th October 2012
quotequote all
xRIEx said:
saaby93 said:
Missed that
I hope this isnt a BBC creates it's own story story
That did occur to me while I was quoting.
shes just a motorist now
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-19861145
on radio 5 tonight 9pm

Edited by saaby93 on Sunday 7th October 21:06

Riley Blue

9,562 posts

134 months

Monday 8th October 2012
quotequote all
Another of example of the public being fleeced due to inadequate monitoring of a public/private contract but the charge is for damage caused, not breaking down. Maybe mods could change title?

DonkeyApple

23,143 posts

77 months

Monday 8th October 2012
quotequote all
It makes sense in some regards for the person who caused the damage to pay for it. But:

The insurance industry has a proven track record of working in concert with third party inflated invoices. So we know categorically that even though some people here have no genuine concept of the real cost of things, there will be over inflated fees.

The more insidious reality is that this shows how private firms will be able to under bid for the maintenance contracts.

Just like with power supply and many other vital 'backbone' facilities there should be a govt specified price guidance from which over billing triggers a full audit as would regular peak billing.

Hugo a Gogo

20,069 posts

141 months

Monday 8th October 2012
quotequote all
"I would have turned my car around myself if I knew I was going to get charged almost £3,000."

brilliant

The Crack Fox

11,548 posts

100 months

Monday 8th October 2012
quotequote all
An aunt of mine flattened a light post on the M1 once, my uncle had to pay £££ for it, but insisted that the council deliver the dead lampost (HUGE thing) to his house. They did !

AJI

3,200 posts

125 months

Monday 8th October 2012
quotequote all
Not sure what the big issue is here.
Motorist causes damage/concern to HA asset which requires repair/inspection to be carried out. And some think that the taxpayer should fund this?

If the motorist is asked to pay directly due to having no insurance then totally their fault.
If motorist has insurance then simply pass the claim on to them as UK insurers are required to provide 3rd party coverage.

I'm sure if the insurance company has any issues they are free to accept or decline the HA/conctractor charges request and the matter can go to court just like any other civil case.