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wilkos

128 posts

124 months

[news] 
Saturday 6th October 2012 quote quote all
Mostly, if you maintain your car well, you are unlikely to have any issues with a modern engine, no matter how you drive. If you do have a failure, then it's more to do with luck than how it's been driven (baring mechanical overevs and the like)

Most of the fleet failures the last few years have been manufacturers extending service intervals beyond what is reasonable. Most of our fleet covers > 100k before its disposed of, and its become screamingly obvious the last few years that 20k mile service intervals are fine for the manufacturers. The engine will last beyond the 3 year 60k mile warranty. There's a surprisingly high failure rate in the 80-100k mile area, which the manufacturers don't give a crap about.

All our fleet cars now get 10k oil changes, and recently we've had no failures.

Now my track car is beaten on more than anything you can do to your road car, and at > 130k miles, with the last 30k being track miles, the car is on its original engine, whilst putting 60% more power than it left the factory with, and revving 1k past its factory red line. Still on original clutch too. The engine burns no oil. The only addition to the factory spec is an oil cooler, and a decent intercooler. It'll do >30 laps of the ring on Monday, and a full day at spa on Wednesday, and it'll get its fluids changed afterwards.

It's all about maintenance, not how you drive it.

Oh and before you picked up your new car, it was likely driven off the end of the line, on and off, multiple car transporters, boats etc, and road testes during the pdi. How likely do you think it is that any of the multiple drivers who drove it before you treated it with respect and drove it gently.

And I guess my masters in mechanical engineering, and running a British engineering firm that's 90% export, that's expanding and making good money, must make me a crap engineer.


Edited by wilkos on Saturday 6th October 11:26

ChrisW.

1,822 posts

141 months

[news] 
Saturday 6th October 2012 quote quote all
Yup, I also changed all fluids at 1500 miles and, after 10,500 miles the car has had three engine oil changes.

Between changes I've added just 2 x 350ml oil -- it just doesn't use the stuff.

tonyj74

22 posts

24 months

[news] 
Wednesday 17th October 2012 quote quote all
The biggest issue I had with running in was the tyres! I picked the car up during a dry spell and only drove it in the wet for the first time about a week later - it was like driving on ice with the ABS kicking in with even the tiniest application of the brake pedal! 50 miles later and everything was fine, but it had me worried for a bit: the tyres on a new car seem to be a lot "greaser" than new tyres you fit afterwards - perhaps they're newer than the ones that end up at the tyre fitters.

I notice that my Boxster doesn't need an oil change after the running-in period. Why would Porsche not advocate that if there was any chance it would be needed? Surely it would be more money for the dealers (and people would be very unlikely to skimp at such an early stage)? This does suggest that there can't be -that- much running in going on or a change would be needed, or perhaps the tolerance are such that the oil / filter can deal with the impurities...

uktrailmonster

4,678 posts

86 months

[news] 
Thursday 18th October 2012 quote quote all
wilkos said:
And I guess my masters in mechanical engineering.....
Taught you absolutely nothing at all about running in internal combustion engines. I know mine didn't. Way too specialist a subject for a simple mech eng degree.

gsewell

329 posts

169 months

[news] 
Thursday 18th October 2012 quote quote all
Best thing with running-in a new car is it gives the driver time to learn its character - so you don't get bitten by driving too hard too early and crashing.
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Blue62

1,872 posts

38 months

[news] 
Thursday 18th October 2012 quote quote all
Love these threads almost as much as the manual v PDK. It's clear that there are plenty of qualified engineers who think running in is either uneccessary or actually harms the engine and while I would bow to their knowledge, I'm left with the manufacturers handbook, which suggests somthing rather different. I rarely keep a car for more than 2 years and always question why I run them in (I don't follow the instructions to the letter), but then I like to think that the next owner will get the benefit of my mechanical sympathy.

Ash 996 GT2

3,608 posts

127 months

[news] 
Thursday 18th October 2012 quote quote all
Buy car, cane it, sell it after 12 months smile

uktrailmonster

4,678 posts

86 months

[news] 
Thursday 18th October 2012 quote quote all
Blue62 said:
I'm left with the manufacturers handbook, which suggests somthing rather different.
I've got lots of engineering qualifications too and I take the same approach as you i.e. read what the manufacturer recommends. What they recommend makes perfect sense too, so why question it? Having said that, thrashing a cold engine (run in or otherwise) is about the worst thing you can do. Closely followed by countless miles of crawling around cities and silly long oil change intervals. Both guaranteed to lead to long term issues. In the overall scheme of things 'running in' is probably not so critical as some people have mentioned.

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