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Soovy

33,281 posts

157 months

[news] 
Thursday 11th October 2012 quote quote all
THUNDERHORSE said:
Thanks Chris, from all I have read, Porsche use a number of approved suppliers so could be Textar one week or Pagid the next, they just get put in a Porsche box and charged at roughly twice the price. May be wrong but that seems to be the perceived wisdom on the forums. My dilemma is whether to use OEM parts and fit it myself for a few hundered pounds all in or bend over and pay close to a couple of thousand to OPC for same job if it was a warranty condition. Soovy seems to know about these things so I may be stuck, but even with the 111 point inspection, would they even notice or care if the parts are the same...
In all hoesnty it's a long time since I read the policy, and Porsche may well have backed off, but certianly at one stage it was absolutely the case that touching the car yourself = warranty void.


THUNDERHORSE

50 posts

47 months

[news] 
Thursday 11th October 2012 quote quote all
Thanks Soovey, 111 Point inspection is getting done today so we will see what they say and what options I have if they think brakes need replaced - hopefully not but I think they sometimes do try to get you to replace even if not absolutely necessary and the warranty renewal is leverage for them..

Chrisp5782

Original Poster:

452 posts

24 months

[news] 
Thursday 11th October 2012 quote quote all
THUNDERHORSE said:
Thanks Soovey, 111 Point inspection is getting done today so we will see what they say and what options I have if they think brakes need replaced - hopefully not but I think they sometimes do try to get you to replace even if not absolutely necessary and the warranty renewal is leverage for them..
Good luck, here's hoping it goes your way!?
judge

THUNDERHORSE

50 posts

47 months

[news] 
Thursday 11th October 2012 quote quote all
Cheers Chris, fingers crossed

boxedin

johnycarrera

1,782 posts

116 months

[news] 
Thursday 11th October 2012 quote quote all
I had a WarrantyWise policy and suffered a catastrophic failure due to a broken oil pump.
Long story short as its been done to death on this forum about WarrantyWise, they refused to pay out claiming it was wear and tear.
Tried to sue but my lawyers said the small print in their policy was such that I would never win.
15K rebuild for me plus the WarrantyWise policy cost...........

Horrific to deal with, save your money!
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Chrisp5782

Original Poster:

452 posts

24 months

[news] 
Thursday 11th October 2012 quote quote all
johnycarrera said:
I had a WarrantyWise policy and suffered a catastrophic failure due to a broken oil pump.
Long story short as its been done to death on this forum about WarrantyWise, they refused to pay out claiming it was wear and tear.
Tried to sue but my lawyers said the small print in their policy was such that I would never win.
15K rebuild for me plus the WarrantyWise policy cost...........

Horrific to deal with, save your money!
I think that just about seals it for me. Thanks very much.
yes

Soovy

33,281 posts

157 months

[news] 
Thursday 11th October 2012 quote quote all
Chrisp5782 said:
johnycarrera said:
I had a WarrantyWise policy and suffered a catastrophic failure due to a broken oil pump.
Long story short as its been done to death on this forum about WarrantyWise, they refused to pay out claiming it was wear and tear.
Tried to sue but my lawyers said the small print in their policy was such that I would never win.
15K rebuild for me plus the WarrantyWise policy cost...........

Horrific to deal with, save your money!
I think that just about seals it for me. Thanks very much.
yes
A narrow escape!

Chrisp5782

Original Poster:

452 posts

24 months

[news] 
Thursday 11th October 2012 quote quote all
Soovy said:
Chrisp5782 said:
johnycarrera said:
I had a WarrantyWise policy and suffered a catastrophic failure due to a broken oil pump.
Long story short as its been done to death on this forum about WarrantyWise, they refused to pay out claiming it was wear and tear.
Tried to sue but my lawyers said the small print in their policy was such that I would never win.
15K rebuild for me plus the WarrantyWise policy cost...........

Horrific to deal with, save your money!
I think that just about seals it for me. Thanks very much.
yes
A narrow escape!
I was soooo nearly sucked in!!
yuck

river_rat

304 posts

89 months

[news] 
Thursday 11th October 2012 quote quote all
I just had Warranty Direct on the phone following up their quote to me - they claim to be different to the others because they DO cover wear and tear.

I'm not convinced though - any experience of this outfit?

thegoose

7,584 posts

96 months

[news] 
Thursday 11th October 2012 quote quote all
river_rat said:
I just had Warranty Direct on the phone following up their quote to me - they claim to be different to the others because they DO cover wear and tear.

I'm not convinced though - any experience of this outfit?
Not of claiming but when selling a car (XC90 T6) last year to a guy taking it to Europe for a few months (later selling it back to us) who needed warranty and breakdown cover (he bought the car as an alternative to renting one), Warranty Direct were the only ones who offered (maybe insisted upon?) an inspection beforehand. I welcomed this of course as it means they couldn't in future wriggle out of a claim due to "wear & tear" or "pre-existing fault", on the basis that in either of these cases it would have been apparent when they'd had it inspected. As it happened, the inspection (which to be fair only cost £60) wasn't all that thorough, so would be easy for any half decent car to pass (but also avoids them covering a car with for example a knackered gearbox, only to have a claim put in for it a few weeks after cover starts).

tjlees

808 posts

123 months

[news] 
Thursday 11th October 2012 quote quote all
johnycarrera said:
I had a WarrantyWise policy and suffered a catastrophic failure due to a broken oil pump.
Long story short as its been done to death on this forum about WarrantyWise, they refused to pay out claiming it was wear and tear.
Tried to sue but my lawyers said the small print in their policy was such that I would never win.
15K rebuild for me plus the WarrantyWise policy cost...........

Horrific to deal with, save your money!
Sorry to here this - and probably done to death but did the policy cover wear and tear? The policy I have with warrantywise covers this and abnormal failures (I.e. If only one shock goes it's covered). Interestedly oil seal leaks are only covered if wear and tear is in your plan according to my policy booklet. So if the OP is buying a policy of any type make sure you tick the wear and tear box.

Also surprised that an oil pump is accounted as an item that would wear out during lifetime of the car ... But that's probably opening up old threads/ discussions.

Paul O

1,229 posts

69 months

[news] 
Thursday 11th October 2012 quote quote all
Just got a quick quote from WW for my 911.... £1,126.55 to include a 10k repair if engine goes pop. Thats about the same price as Porsche. Air con adds another £35. And thats with a £500 excess.

And the "junk mail" box is auto checked and I missed it, which means I can look forward to loads of f**king junk email now. frown

tjlees

808 posts

123 months

[news] 
Thursday 11th October 2012 quote quote all
They will go down in price by quite a bit - particularly if you quote main dealer price. For interest here are the exclusions from my policy (amongst them are corroded parts):



tjlees

808 posts

123 months

[news] 
Thursday 11th October 2012 quote quote all
... and for comparison purposes, the Porsche wear and tear (exclusion) list ....


JackieTreehorn

41 posts

28 months

[news] 
Thursday 11th October 2012 quote quote all
And if you are on the Hartech lifetime maintenance plan, even the labour costs of wear and tear items are covered (excludes tyres, aircon). So if the clutch goes you just pay for the parts, but zero for the labour. And the price of the plan also includes all routine servicing and MOT's.


johnycarrera

1,782 posts

116 months

[news] 
Thursday 11th October 2012 quote quote all
tjlees said:
Sorry to here this - and probably done to death but did the policy cover wear and tear? The policy I have with warrantywise covers this and abnormal failures (I.e. If only one shock goes it's covered). Interestedly oil seal leaks are only covered if wear and tear is in your plan according to my policy booklet. So if the OP is buying a policy of any type make sure you tick the wear and tear box.

Also surprised that an oil pump is accounted as an item that would wear out during lifetime of the car ... But that's probably opening up old threads/ discussions.
My policy didn't cover wear and tear, but my failed oil pump, I believe is not wear and tear. It's a sore one!
I wouldn't take another warranty unless its a Porsche one.
I think these other companies just find ways of weaselling out of paying when it's uneconomical to do so.
I would just try and keep some spare money for repairs on an older car, once bitten and all that frown

mollytherocker

11,138 posts

95 months

[news] 
Thursday 11th October 2012 quote quote all
My view on pretty much everything except my house is self insure.

All your stuff, just pay out when it breaks. So far, it's worked for me.

MTR

MrTickle

1,679 posts

125 months

[news] 
Friday 12th October 2012 quote quote all
Looking at the warranty wise policy it excludes any vehicle modified in part since date of manufacture.

That could exclude cars with different shockers / brakes anyway!

sasha320

88 posts

134 months

[news] 
Friday 12th October 2012 quote quote all
I have researched warranties extensively and have direct experience of both Warrantywise and the Porsche warranty.

My experience has been that neither warranty does what I really wanted. I wanted 100% piece of mind for all mechanical and all electrical failures including wear and tear.

The WW policy purportedly covered wear and tear however this was was elaborated as 'premature failure' in the small print - which is not really the same thing.

Both policies excluded consumable items e.g., gaskets, seals etc.

So, I realised with both warranties that the cover was, unsurprisingly, directed at low probability failures (albeit these failures could be expensive to remedy) and once any claim had been thoroughly qualified, certain aspects were not covered e.g., consumables or items were excluded that formed part of the overall repair.

In itself none of the above made the warranties bad, however through experience I deduced that they were nowhere near as comprehensive as they claim and that one should consider the outcome from a number of scenarios before trying to assess the value of the warranty.

These scenarios might include

- A part failing that is not covered that then causes further, covered parts to fail - what's the payout then?

- The premature failure clause and how that could pan out for a number of scenarios

- What exactly is covered if an engine or gearbox went pop.

So my conclusions were that all the policies would ever do is, to a varying degree, provide a contribution towards any repair bill and the extent of the contribution would be based on the unique repair scenario that presented itself I.e., the warranty's marketing of 'what's covered and what's not' is actually misleading as it is not always the case that a single item(s) fail on their own.

Once I got my head around this, then I realised that the only way to judge whether a warranty was worth having was if I had access to a database of scenarios that had been paid out previously vs. their total invoice cost vs. the probability of the scenario occurring at all. Given this information is not readily available, then I formed the view that the decision to proceed was an emotional one driven by my fear of being stiffed with a big unexpected bill. A decision based on 'is it worth it or not' was simply not available without better information.

Bottom line is that these policies are partial piece of mind for anxious types to help them sleep more easily at night. I guess those that self-insure would stay awake all night grinding their teeth in frustration if they bought a policy and never claimed on it, which is why they sleep more easily at night without a policy.

For the record I always get a warranty and for the record the best warranty I've ever had was the Mercedes Tier 1 warranty - that covered wear and tear (and everything else) very extensively and I got heaps of work done well beyond the cost of the warranty on both a CL55 and an ML63. But I would suggest that the cover I enjoyed was not driven by the conditions of the warranty, but on the customer focus displayed by the dealer(s) and the engineers who qualified each claim.

In conclusion, buy a warranty if you're a nervous type and / or if you think the dealer / warranty company will always look kindly on your claim and / or if you truly have limited resources for unforeseen repairs. If you try and make a decision based on incomplete probabilities and / or anecdotal wisdom (like mine) - that's called betting.







Edited by sasha320 on Friday 12th October 09:43

Chrisp5782

Original Poster:

452 posts

24 months

[news] 
Friday 12th October 2012 quote quote all
sasha320 said:
I have researched warranties extensively and have direct experience of both Warrantywise and the Porsche warranty.

My experience has been that neither warranty does what I really wanted. I wanted 100% piece of mind for all mechanical and all electrical failures including wear and tear.

The WW policy purportedly covered wear and tear however this was was elaborated as 'premature failure' in the small print - which is not really the same thing.

Both policies excluded consumable items e.g., gaskets, seals etc.

So, I realised with both warranties that the cover was, unsurprisingly, directed at low probability failures (albeit these failures could be expensive to remedy) and once any claim had been thoroughly qualified, certain aspects were not covered e.g., consumables or items were excluded that formed part of the overall repair.

In itself none of the above made the warranties bad, however through experience I deduced that they were nowhere near as comprehensive as they claim and that one should consider the outcome from a number of scenarios before trying to assess the value of the warranty.

These scenarios might include

- A part failing that is not covered that then causes further, covered parts to fail - what's the payout then?

- The premature failure clause and how that could pan out for a number of scenarios

- What exactly is covered if an engine or gearbox went pop.

So my conclusions were that all the policies would ever do is, to a varying degree, provide a contribution towards any repair bill and the extent of the contribution would be based on the unique repair scenario that presented itself I.e., the warranty's marketing of 'what's covered and what's not' is actually misleading as it is not always the case that a single item(s) fail on their own.

Once I got my head around this, then I realised that the only way to judge whether a warranty was worth having was if I had access to a database of scenarios that had been paid out previously vs. their total invoice cost vs. the probability of the scenario occurring at all. Given this information is not readily available, then I formed the view that the decision to proceed was an emotional one driven by my fear of being stiffed with a big unexpected bill. A decision based on 'is it worth it or not' was simply not available without better information.

Bottom line is that these policies are partial piece of mind for anxious types to help them sleep more easily at night. I guess those that self-insure would stay awake all night grinding their teeth in frustration if they bought a policy and never claimed on it, which is why they sleep more easily at night without a policy.

For the record I always get a warranty and for the record the best warranty I've ever had was the Mercedes Tier 1 warranty - that covered wear and tear (and everything else) very extensively and I got heaps of work done well beyond the cost of the warranty on both a CL55 and an ML63. But I would suggest that the cover I enjoyed was not driven by the conditions of the warranty, but on the customer focus displayed by the dealer(s) and the engineers who qualified each claim.

In conclusion, buy a warranty if you're a nervous type and / or if you think the dealer / warranty company will always look kindly on your claim and / or if you truly have limited resources for unforeseen repairs. If you try and make a decision based on incomplete probabilities and / or anecdotal wisdom (like mine) - that's called betting.








Edited by sasha320 on Friday 12th October 09:43
I'm not that worried about a failure so, having garnered a lot of opinion and more than a little actual experience on this thread I think I'll sack the warranty, save some cash and have a couple of extra cocktails this weekend!!

Edited by Chrisp5782 on Friday 12th October 11:18

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