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_Neal_

Original Poster:

1,274 posts

105 months

[news] 
Sunday 3rd May 2009 quote quote all
Hi all

As I posted on another thread, I passed Part 1 of the new test yesterday.

Some people mentioned it’d be useful for me to do a quick run-through of Part 1, with hints and tips I picked up from other candidates, instructors, and the examiner I passed with, so here it is!




General Stuff

As you probably know, the testing for part 1 is done on a large tarmac “pad”. Cones are set out in the arrangement shown in the link below

http://www.dsa.gov.uk/Documents/MPTC/2009/dsa_moto...

You are allowed five minor faults before failing the test. I have put the “common” minor faults where appropriate (according to instructors/examiner) for each manouevre below, and major faults where they aren’t obvious. Manouevres are in the order in which you do them on test.

When you first arrive at the test centre, the examiner will look at your paperwork (licence, theory test certificate and CBT certificate) sign you in on his mark sheet, then take you out to your bike. You won’t be in radio contact with the examiner on test - he’ll be walking around on the pad, and will talk to you between manoeuvres by walking over to where you’re stopped.

The examiner will probably emphasise that you need to ride on the pad as if you were riding on the road, and that touching any of the cones will be a bad thing! He/she will also explain that he will talk you through each manoeuvre (showing you a laminated card of the above plan) before each manoeuvre.

Onto the pad

The examiner will ask you to start the bike up and manoeuvre it to the edge of the pad (somewhere below the positions marked 1 and 8 on the plan above). The examiner then asks you to either ride or push your bike onto the pad and into one of the 2 green-coned “garages” (1) and park the bike up facing forwards, put it on its stand, and get off the bike. It is your choice which garage you go into.

Minor fault - Failing to do appropriate observations before pulling away onto the pad.

Wheel the machine

You must then take the bike off its stand, and push it backwards out of one “garage” into the other, so that it is facing forwards out of the second garage, then put it on its stand.

Tips:

This does not have to be done in a single “move” (i.e in an arc backwards).

Having discussed it with the examiners, my training school taught it like this:

i - push the bike straight backwards until the rear wheel is approximately level with the first of the yellow slalom cones;
ii - then push the bike forwards with full lock until it is on the other side of the same cone;
iii - then push the bike straight backwards into the other garage. You can really take your time with this.

That’s how I did it on test and the examiner didn’t comment - other candidates have done the same with different examiners with no issues. Personally, I think it’s a lot easier than trying to push the machine (especially if it’s a 500cc and you aren’t tall/strong) in a single arc.

Slalom and Figure of Eight

You are then asked to get on the bike, ride out of the garage, slalom between the 5 yellow cones (3), then ride directly into doing two figures of eight around the 2 blue cones (4). The examiner will stop you when you’ve carried out the two circuits (you don’t have to keep count!).

Tips:

In my practice for this test, we were told that examiners would allow you to make the figure of eight larger (and easier) by doing it around the last blue cone and the last yellow cone (so the first of the blue cones is at the centre of the 8).

There seems to be slightly mixed messages on this point, as I know one examiner who allowed it, and one examiner who gave a minor fault for using the yellow cone. I guess the advice is don’t use it unless you have to - much better making the 8 larger and getting a minor fault than putting a foot down and failing the test!

Circuit Ride, Avoidance and Controlled Stop

You will then be asked to ride the circuit (5) at 30 km/h or more, passing through the speed trap (6) at 50 km/h or more, swerve through the blue cones and stop with your front wheel in the box (7).

Tips:

This is obviously very difficult to practice (unless your school hires the official pad). The key to this manoeuvre is to look through the corner, opening the throttle quite firmly on exit to get up to the speed.

The instructors I spoke to said it was pretty much impossible (on either a 500cc (Kawasaki ER-5 and Suzuki GS500 were tested) or a 125cc (Honda CG tested) to get up to the 50 km/h speed unless you remain in 2nd gear for the whole manoeuvre - you really do need that extra acceleration, and you need to get on the throttle relatively sharply to get up to speed. The swerve itself is actually quite gentle (and comes pretty easily if you’re looking through to the box).

U-Turn

Next comes the U-turn (8). The examiner will again talk you through it, and you will ride straight on and into the turn. This is probably the most straightforward manouevre on the new test, as the width allowed is 7.5m (wider than pretty much any road on which the U-turn on the old test was carried out) there is no slope (or road camber) on the pad, and there is no traffic! Obviously you still need to do the observations.

Slow Ride

After the U-turn comes the slow ride exercise (9). The examiner will walk a few paces ahead of you before asking you to move off, and will then walk briskly with his arm held out - you must remain behind him at all times for the length of the ride (17m).

Tips

Again, this is a pretty straightforward exercise. I know of one candidate who stalled the bike towards the end of the exercise, and was allowed to restart the bike, do the observations again, and carry on (with just a minor fault). He was told afterwards that he would have failed the test had he not done his observations again. I have no idea whether another examiner would take the same view - I would guess it depends on their overall view of your riding and how picky they're feeling!

Circuit Ride and Emergency Stop

You will then be asked to ride the circuit again (10). As far as I know the examiner will pick the same circuit (right or left hand) that you used for the avoidance move. Again, ride the circuit in second gear, accelerate out of the corner up to 50km/h, and perform the emergency stop (11) when the examiner raises his hand.

Tips:

It was much easier to get up to the required speed on this manoeuvre than on the swerve, as it is just a straight shot out of the corner through the speed trap and beyond it.

Instructors riding on the new pads said it was easy to lock up the rear (resulting in a fail), as the new tarmac used is are not bedded in yet. This is especially the case on bikes with rear disc brakes (GS500, Honda CB500) but the examiner’s tip was to stay away from the rear brake entirely. Locking up either wheel will result in failure. You can practice the emergency stop on road, and it’s well worth practicing at 35mph+ as you may well be doing this speed on the test.

Speed Readings

After completing the emergency stop the examiner will review the speed trap readings for the avoidance manoeuvre and the emergency stop. As far as I know, every examiner will have a hand-held display that shows the speeds.

If you have made it up to 50kp/h for each manoeuvre, the test will end, and the examiner will feed back to you whether you’ve passed or failed. The examiner I had did this on the pad, immediately after the stop, but I know others have been taken back into the reception area at the centre.

If you haven’t hit the required speed, the examiner will ask you to repeat the manoeuvre/manoeuvres where you were too slow. You then have one further chance to get up to speed. Failure to do so on the second attempt will mean you’ll fail the test overall.

Tips:

According the examiner and instructors I spoke to, failing to get to the right speed (especially on the avoidance manoeuvre) is already the most common way candidates fail to pass the test.

In terms of actually finding out how “slow” you were - and therefore be able to judge how much faster to go, again experiences differ. The candidate I took my test with was shown his speed readings before making his second run. Two other candidates with a different examiner were given no clue as to whether they were far too slow or just missed the speed.

Good advice may be to use the first run as a “sighting lap” so you can get a feel for the corner and the swerve/stop. I also think it’s really important to get a good idea of how your bike feels (revs/noise-wise) at 30-35mph before taking the test, as you certainly don’t have time to look down at the speedo during either manoeuvre.

Examiner Comment

In addition to the failure to get up to speed, the examiner I spoke to said that people were also failing after incurring more than 5 minor faults for lack of observation. He felt that people were being thrown by the fact they were essentially riding off-road, and that the observations that may come naturally on-road weren’t being done on the pad.

I was also told that knocking down any cone will end the test immediately, and any locked wheel when stopping will result in failure.

When you pass

The examiner will give you your mark sheet and a Part 1 Pass Certificate. These will be needed when you have your Part 2 road ride.




Sorry if that’s all a bit long-winded, but I started writing and thought I might as well make the post as full as possible. Hope people doing the new test find it helpful - and do let me know if I’ve missed anything out!

I found this video summary on YouTube which seems useful too: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MGIzCyiiADY

Good luck with Part 1 smile

Neal

rt911

306 posts

89 months

[news] 
Sunday 3rd May 2009 quote quote all
_Neal_ said:
Again, this is a pretty straightforward exercise. I know of one candidate who stalled the bike towards the end of the exercise, and was allowed to restart the bike, do the observations again, and carry on (with just a minor fault). He was told afterwards that he would have failed the test had he not done his observations again. I have no idea whether another examiner would take the same view - I would guess it depends on their overall view of your riding and how picky they're feeling!





Spot on, I did this Friday just gone, stalled. put it neutral, restarted, 1st gear, shoulder checks/mirrors then carried on. Spoke to the examiner, I thought it was all over, just 1 minor, and I passed

yeehaa

Ace-T

5,738 posts

141 months

[news] 
Sunday 3rd May 2009 quote quote all
thumbup

That's a great write up and well done! Good luck for the next bit. wavey

Trace smile

Hyperion

8,324 posts

86 months

[news] 
Sunday 3rd May 2009 quote quote all
Excellent review...I just thank god I got my license 22 years ago before all this nonsense came in smile

obscene

3,997 posts

71 months

[news] 
Sunday 3rd May 2009 quote quote all
Many thanks for the write up and congrats on passing. I will be praciticing my nuts off trying to get ready for the test and hope I pass. At least I have till the 28th to get it all sorted out smile
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_Neal_

Original Poster:

1,274 posts

105 months

[news] 
Monday 4th May 2009 quote quote all
Cheers guys, and nice one RT for passing it too! It's definitely positive that the examiners seem to be consistent smile

DTorr

22 posts

66 months

[news] 
Tuesday 5th May 2009 quote quote all
Cheers for the review mate smile really helpful biggrin

Hyperion said:
I got my license 22 years ago before all this nonsense came in smile
Lucky Git wink

f13ldy

1,431 posts

87 months

[news] 
Tuesday 5th May 2009 quote quote all
Sounds like a right pain in the ass!

Just one question though, if you fail part 2, do you have to re-take part 1?

mrh3113

185 posts

85 months

[news] 
Tuesday 5th May 2009 quote quote all
f13ldy said:
Sounds like a right pain in the ass!

Just one question though, if you fail part 2, do you have to re-take part 1?
Nope. Apparently, it's a bit like the CBT - valid for 2 years I think. You then just keep on going with part 2 yil you pass it.

Thanks for the review also; the more info the better. I'm due on the 28th too. Also practicing my nuts off....

kenbitcher

188 posts

88 months

[news] 
Wednesday 6th May 2009 quote quote all
Can you give us a ballpark figure on how much part one has cost, and how much you expect part 2 to cost?

Chilli

16,945 posts

122 months

[news] 
Wednesday 6th May 2009 quote quote all
Thanks for posting that Neal. With Mrs C booking it up shortly, this will come in handy.

_Neal_

Original Poster:

1,274 posts

105 months

[news] 
Wednesday 6th May 2009 quote quote all
Thanks Chilli.

Ken, I actually did a DAS course under the old test (but unfortunately failed on a locked wheel on the emergency stop) so can't give an accurate cost assessment on Part 1/Part 2.

It'll very much depend on which bike school you use, as some are booking both Part 1 and Part 2 tests on the same day (on the assumption that you'll pass Part 1) whereas some are doing them separately - increased cost for an extra day on the bike, but less risk of losing your Part 2 test fee by failing Part 1.

kit_kat

247 posts

79 months

[news] 
Wednesday 6th May 2009 quote quote all
kenbher said:
Can you give us a ballpark figure on how much part one has cost, and how much you expect part 2 to cost?
This may be different for the OP but I was quoted £208 for part 1 and 449.50 for part 2, that includes bike hire.

Touring Remo

2,756 posts

99 months

[news] 
Wednesday 6th May 2009 quote quote all
My training is £480 for four days training and module 1 included. Then a further £120 for one days training and module 2.

obscene

3,997 posts

71 months

[news] 
Wednesday 6th May 2009 quote quote all
Assuming you don't do DAS and have all the gear/bike part one is £10 and I believe part 2 is £70 but I haven't booked part 2 yet so don't know.

_Neal_

Original Poster:

1,274 posts

105 months

[news] 
Thursday 7th May 2009 quote quote all
That's right - part 2 is £70 smile

N Dentressangle

2,933 posts

108 months

[news] 
Monday 11th May 2009 quote quote all
There's lots of good stuff on this thread - could it be added to the sticky for new riders at the top, perhaps?

catso

11,095 posts

153 months

[news] 
Monday 11th May 2009 quote quote all
DTorr said:
Cheers for the review mate smile really helpful biggrin

Hyperion said:
I got my license 22 years ago before all this nonsense came in smile
Lucky Git wink
Lucky but old....... wink

SpydieNut

5,047 posts

109 months

[news] 
Tuesday 12th May 2009 quote quote all
clap

nice one neal - great write up and well done on passing.

i'll be doing it in the next 4-6 wks probably biggrin

M.J.S

93 posts

67 months

[news] 
Tuesday 12th May 2009 quote quote all
I did this last week as well, managed to get through it without any problems.
one thing that helped me with the minimum speed was to get used to the sound the engine revs made in second at 35mph before the test. That way I had a better idea if I needed to give it a little extra throttle or not.

The examiner said about 33% of people who have attempted the mod 1 have failed.

In Swindon there was a guy who put his 125 down on the swerve, but they think he grabbed a load of front brake whilst swerving.



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