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BuzzLightyear

Original Poster:

1,356 posts

62 months

[news] 
Monday 1st October 2012 quote quote all
Has anyone tried the (modified) Alternate Day Fasting thing that was on Horizon?

Apparently, by eating less than 600 calories a day (for men, 500 for women) [bold]on two, non-consecutive days a week[/bold] and eating normally on the other 5 days, you will not only lose weight but become markedly more healthy at the same time.

Originally, the idea was to "fast" on alternate days but this was found to have the same effects as normal dieting, so was modified as above and as described in this article: http://www.webmd.boots.com/diet/features/is-fastin...

A friend, his OH and his father have all been following it for a few weeks and are happy with the results. My Oh and I are starting it this week. I will post up our findings if anyone's interested and / or wants to join in?

OtherBusiness

85 posts

22 months

[news] 
Monday 1st October 2012 quote quote all
I am doing it at the moment (in fact today is a fast day, I also fast on Wednesday). 7 lbs down in 5 weeks, and the body fat is 3% less. Finding it pretty good, little bit hungry on the fast day but nothing major. I spread the calories out over the day - breakfast is usually 2 eggs (scrambled) and a couple of slices of ham. Lunch I have a sandwich with Nimble bread, ham, thin smearing of English mustard, and then dinner something like chicken breast/fish lots of veg. I drink a lot of green tea during the day too.

rudecherub

1,937 posts

46 months

[news] 
Monday 1st October 2012 quote quote all
I caught the Horizon programme week or so ago, had it recorded, but hadn't got around to watching.

Started the next day, and it's okay, not hard at all, 600 calories on fast day is hardly fasting.

Trousers already indicate I'm back to normal after feeling a bit tight.

Got my dad to try, he has his blood measured for cholesterol etc, regularly, so it will be interesting to see what shows up.

Discussing this over a huge curry a couple of days into the diet with my bro-in-law, and we laughed saying imagine if the obesity problem is as easy as this to fix - perhaps we'll look back at eating three meals every day as been as crazy as surgeons not washing their hands before operations.

edit I'm doing genuine alternate eat "fast" eat ie every other day.

Edited by rudecherub on Monday 1st October 11:39

a311

2,971 posts

57 months

[news] 
Monday 1st October 2012 quote quote all
Seems to be the 'buzz' (excuse the pun) diet at the moment. Not sure I could do it but if you can actually eat/consume what you want on the non-fast days might suit allot of people.

hman

5,411 posts

74 months

[news] 
Monday 1st October 2012 quote quote all
Fasting diets are not reccomended by anyone in the medical proffession.
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rudecherub

1,937 posts

46 months

[news] 
Monday 1st October 2012 quote quote all
hman said:
Fasting diets are not reccomended by anyone in the medical proffession.
Did you follow the OP's link, watch the Horizon documentary?

It appears not.

otolith

23,765 posts

84 months

[news] 
Monday 1st October 2012 quote quote all
The OP's link certainly makes the point that mainstream medical opinion does not favour fasting.

Not sure I'd call 600 cals "fasting", though.

rudecherub

1,937 posts

46 months

[news] 
Monday 1st October 2012 quote quote all
otolith said:
The OP's link certainly makes the point that mainstream medical opinion does not favour fasting.

Not sure I'd call 600 cals "fasting", though.
Neither would I.

  • anyone* was the problem, sure this isn't mainstream, if that is getting an article on Boots, BBC Horizon, & here doesn't count.
Thing is I've been reading about and around the Longevity question, SENS etc and known about calorie restriction for some time.

The science shows that it works, yeast to mice & rats, etc how well it works in humans is another matter because we've got to wait a life time for results!

Although as Horizon showed the measurable results in humans shows benefits.

That said it did occur me that the oft said fact that "We" were healthier during the War & Rationing is perhaps similar.

I'm sure folks 'saved up' rations to feast, and some days went a little hungry, and or ate poorly, especially parents with children, by accident doing ADF

BuzzLightyear

Original Poster:

1,356 posts

62 months

[news] 
Monday 1st October 2012 quote quote all
a311 said:
Seems to be the 'buzz' (excuse the pun) diet at the moment. Not sure I could do it but if you can actually eat/consume what you want on the non-fast days might suit allot of people.
Yes, that is the point, I think: You can eat whatever you want on the non-fasting days (otherwise I know I wouldn't be interested / able to maintain the programme). The difference with this idea is that it is a long-term, sustainable change in the way you eat which reduces (excess) weight and reduces cholestorol etc.

Those who are doing it or intend to start are welcome to put up their stats / progress on this thread.

As of today, Day 1 for me, I am 6'3 weigh 16st 4lbs on my bathroom scales and am intending to stick to the 600 cal limit on Tuesdays and Thursdays.



Thanks to everyone for your posts. smile

hman

5,411 posts

74 months

[news] 
Monday 1st October 2012 quote quote all
rudecherub said:
hman said:
Fasting diets are not reccomended by anyone in the medical proffession.
Did you follow the OP's link, watch the Horizon documentary?

It appears not.
Theres no need for me to waste my time watching Horizon etc. Mrs Hman is a BDA and HPC registered Dietician.

HTH.

Timsta

2,436 posts

126 months

[news] 
Monday 1st October 2012 quote quote all
hman said:
Theres no need for me to waste my time watching Horizon etc. Mrs Hman is a BDA and HPC registered Dietician.

HTH.
I'm a dietician too, and I fully endorse ADF.

(There is no legal requirements to call yourself a dietician, so saying your other half is one holds no water.)

rudecherub

1,937 posts

46 months

[news] 
Monday 1st October 2012 quote quote all
Timsta said:
hman said:
Theres no need for me to waste my time watching Horizon etc. Mrs Hman is a BDA and HPC registered Dietician.

HTH.
I'm a dietician too, and I fully endorse ADF.

(There is no legal requirements to call yourself a dietician, so saying your other half is one holds no water.)
Additionally googling caloric restriction longevity ( scholarly articles ) brings up a great deal of peer reviewed works.

hman

5,411 posts

74 months

[news] 
Monday 1st October 2012 quote quote all
Timsta said:
hman said:
Theres no need for me to waste my time watching Horizon etc. Mrs Hman is a BDA and HPC registered Dietician.

HTH.
I'm a dietician too, and I fully endorse ADF.

(There is no legal requirements to call yourself a dietician, so saying your other half is one holds no water.)
Your profile says your a web developer - I'm not really seeing your point here.

Please advise your current HPC and BDA status - or are you simply delusional?

Timsta

2,436 posts

126 months

[news] 
Monday 1st October 2012 quote quote all
No, if you had watched the documentary, you would know. Anybody can call themselves a dietician. It's not like calling yourself a doctor or a dentist. There are no legal qualifications, anyone at any time can claim to be a dietician.

Now, that aside, dismissing something without actually looking into it is just a bit silly. Perhaps watch the documentary first, then you will know what we're talking about.

rudecherub

1,937 posts

46 months

[news] 
Monday 1st October 2012 quote quote all
hman said:
Timsta said:
hman said:
Theres no need for me to waste my time watching Horizon etc. Mrs Hman is a BDA and HPC registered Dietician.

HTH.
I'm a dietician too, and I fully endorse ADF.

(There is no legal requirements to call yourself a dietician, so saying your other half is one holds no water.)
Your profile says your a web developer - I'm not really seeing your point here.

Please advise your current HPC and BDA status - or are you simply delusional?
"Alternate day fasting is another way of reducing the overall amount of calories eaten to help with weight loss," according to Emer Delaney from the British Dietetic Association. From the Boots article

Krista Varady, PhD
Assistant Professor Krista Varady
Phone 312-996-7897
Fax 312-413-0319
Email varady@uic.edu

Bio

2008 Postdoctoral Fellowship, University of California, Berkeley
2006 PhD, McGill University, Montreal
2002 BASc, University of Guelph, Ontario

Research Interests

My research investigates the ability of novel dietary restriction strategies to facilitate weight loss and decrease cardiovascular risk in obese subjects. The most common dietary restriction protocol implemented is daily calorie restriction (CR), which involves reducing energy intake by 15 to 40% of needs daily. Another dietary restriction regimen employed, although far less commonly, is alternate day fasting (ADF). ADF regimens include a “feed day” where food is consumed ad-libitum over 24-h, alternated with a “fast day”, where food intake is partially or completely reduced for 24-h. ADF regimens were created to increase adherence to dietary restriction protocols since these regimens only require energy restriction every other day, rather than every day, as with CR. Recent findings from our lab demonstrate that ADF is an effective means of facilitating weight loss and improving several indicators of cardiovascular disease risk in overweight and obese subjects. Our findings also show that changes in adipose tissue physiology during weight loss may mediate these improvements in vascular health.

Current research activities

Developing novel diet and exercise regimens to facilitate weight loss and decrease cardiovascular disease risk in humans; Examining the intermediate role of adipose tissue in mediating the cardio-protective effects of diet and exercise; Investigating the behavioral factors that influence adherence to dietary restriction strategies

Research publications

Varady KA, Bhutani S, Church EC, Klempel MC. Short-term modified alternate day fasting: A novel dietary strategy for weight loss and cardio-protection in obese adults. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2009; 90: 1138-43.
Varady KA, Bhutani S, Church EC, Phillips SA. Adipokine responses to acute resistance exercise in trained and untrained men. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2009: In Press.
Varady KA and Bhutani S. Nibbling versus feasting: Which meal pattern is better for heart disease prevention? Nutrition Reviews. 2009; 67: 591-8.
Varady KA, Tussing L, Bhutani S, Braunschweig CL. Degree of weight loss required to improve adipokine concentrations and decrease fat cell size in severely obese women. Metabolism. 2009; 58: 1096-11.
Jaworski K, Ahmadian M, Duncan RE, Sarkadi-Nagy E, Varady KA, Hellerstein MK, Lee HY, Samuel VT, Shulman GI, Kim KH, de Val S, Kang C, Sul HS. AdPLA ablation increases lipolysis and prevents obesity induced by high-fat feeding or leptin deficiency. Nature Medicine. 2009; 15: 159-68.
Ahmadian M, Duncan RE, Varady KA, Frasson D, Hellerstein MK, Birkenfeld AL, Samuel VT, Shulman G, Wang Y, Kang C, Sul HS. Adipose overexpression of desnutrin promotes fatty acid utilization and promotes diet-induced obesity. Diabetes. 2009. 2009; 58: 855-66.
Varady KA, Roohk DJ, McEvoy-Hein BK, Gaylinn BD, Thorner MO, Hellerstein MK. Modified alternate-day fasting regimens reduce cell proliferation rates to a similar extent as daily calorie restriction in mice. FASEB Journal. 2008; 22: 2090-6.
Varady KA, Roohk DJ, Loe YC, McEvoy-Hein BK, Hellerstein MK. Effect of modified alternate-day fasting regimens on adipocyte size, triglyceride metabolism, and adipokine levels in mice. Journal of Lipid Research. 2007; 48: 2212-9.
Varady KA, Hellerstein MK. Alternate-day fasting for chronic disease prevention: A review of human and animal trials. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2007; 86: 7-13.

Teaching Interests

HN 309 - Nutrition Science II
HN 440 - The Research Process
HN 514 - Advanced Vitamins and Minerals in Human Nutrition


What's your wife's qualifications?

hman

5,411 posts

74 months

[news] 
Monday 1st October 2012 quote quote all
readit

from the British Dietetic Association

The Role of Dietitians

Registered Dietitians (RDs) are the only qualified health professionals that assess, diagnose and treat diet and nutrition problems at an individual and wider public health level. Uniquely, dietitians use the most up to date public health and scientific research on food, health and disease, which they translate into practical guidance to enable people to make appropriate lifestyle and food choices.

Dietitians are the only nutrition professionals to be statutorily regulated, and governed by an ethical code, to ensure that they always work to the highest standard. Dietitians work in the NHS, private practice, industry, education, research, sport, media, public relations, publishing, NGOs and government. Their advice influences food and health policy across the spectrum from government, local communities and individuals.

The title dietitian can only be used by those appropriately trained professionals who have registered with the Health and Care Professions Council and whose details are on the HCPC web site.

Are you confused with "nutritionists"?

FiF

21,908 posts

131 months

[news] 
Monday 1st October 2012 quote quote all
Timsta said:
No, if you had watched the documentary, you would know. Anybody can call themselves a dietician. It's not like calling yourself a doctor or a dentist. There are no legal qualifications, anyone at any time can claim to be a dietician.

Now, that aside, dismissing something without actually looking into it is just a bit silly. Perhaps watch the documentary first, then you will know what we're talking about.
cough

el stovey

14,532 posts

143 months

[news] 
Monday 1st October 2012 quote quote all
I did this amazing diet, it involved eating less rubbish and drinking less alcohol and doing more exercise. I think it's good for your health too.

Timsta

2,436 posts

126 months

[news] 
Monday 1st October 2012 quote quote all
hman said:
readit

from the British Dietetic Association

The Role of Dietitians

Registered Dietitians (RDs) are the only qualified health professionals that assess, diagnose and treat diet and nutrition problems at an individual and wider public health level. Uniquely, dietitians use the most up to date public health and scientific research on food, health and disease, which they translate into practical guidance to enable people to make appropriate lifestyle and food choices.

Dietitians are the only nutrition professionals to be statutorily regulated, and governed by an ethical code, to ensure that they always work to the highest standard. Dietitians work in the NHS, private practice, industry, education, research, sport, media, public relations, publishing, NGOs and government. Their advice influences food and health policy across the spectrum from government, local communities and individuals.

The title dietitian can only be used by those appropriately trained professionals who have registered with the Health and Care Professions Council and whose details are on the HCPC web site.

Are you confused with "nutritionists"?
I retract my statement. Yes, it's a nutritionist I was thinking of. I apologise. Please do view the Horizon episode though, as it was backed up by a fair bit of testing.

hman

5,411 posts

74 months

[news] 
Monday 1st October 2012 quote quote all
rudecherub said:
hman said:
Timsta said:
hman said:
Theres no need for me to waste my time watching Horizon etc. Mrs Hman is a BDA and HPC registered Dietician.

HTH.
I'm a dietician too, and I fully endorse ADF.

(There is no legal requirements to call yourself a dietician, so saying your other half is one holds no water.)
Your profile says your a web developer - I'm not really seeing your point here.

Please advise your current HPC and BDA status - or are you simply delusional?
"Alternate day fasting is another way of reducing the overall amount of calories eaten to help with weight loss," according to Emer Delaney from the British Dietetic Association. From the Boots article

Krista Varady, PhD
"Alternate day fasting is another way of reducing the overall amount of calories eaten to help with weight loss," is about as compelling as "eating better everyday is another way of reducing the overall amount of calories eaten to help with weight loss"

The two quotations are correct - but which is the current advice for practising Dietitians?, and which is the more sustainable long term?

That would be the latter not the former.

My wifes qualifications are that she is a fully state registered dietitian with a diploma in allergies leading two teams of dietitians over two hospitals within the NHS trust. Shes also the MD of a company specialising in dietitic advice - with specialist experience in paediatric care. She has literally decades of first hand experience in dietetics - every day - all day ( sometimes weekends too!)

However what she is not doing currently is promoting the latest fad of fasting diets, nor did she promote atkins(look at what happened to him), or any of the other fads which surface just in time for the run up to Christmas.

I asked her opinion on these diets- the answer is, they are not reccomended by us, they are a means to get some initial weight loss but we do not see them as sustainable.

I really hope that helps you - I'm not sure it will, but thats all I can offer you.





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