Login | Register
SearchMy Stuff
My ProfileMy PreferencesMy Mates RSS Feed
Reply to Topic
Author Discussion

Gazzas86

Original Poster:

1,100 posts

57 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
Afternoon Folks,

I need some advice on the title and i'm hoping i could get some to help me decide.
Bit of a background, Me and the GF have moved into our own house, and have been in it for a year, It's a semi detatched, conservatory, enclosed garden etc. Now... i come from a 'pet' background, and my parents have a lovely dobermann called Zak, i grew up with him he's great. My OH however is the complete opposite, no pets etc, when we visit she's a bit scared of him, won't stroke him etc, when he barks it makes her jump. The only dog she likes is her best friend's a Cocker Spanniel?.

I must add im in the forces, so i go away now and then, so if we do get a pet i wont be able to look after it all the time, hence the reason she doesnt want a dog as 'they require to much attention' etc etc. along with she works full time (8.30am-6pm)

Now she has mentioned getting a Cat, theres plenty of other cats in the area, (some find it a good idea to crap on my lawn and walk over my car!!!) so maybe having a cat of our own wouldnt be a bad idea for territory etc.

i must add my OH is very house proud, kind of OCD, you know the type that has scatter pillows on beds etc, basically like a show home (she gets it from her mother).

Now obviously when i go away the pet will give my OH some company / affection to stop her missing me etc some i'm all for the idea.

What i need to know, if you we're in my situation what would you do? is it a good idea getting a pet for the above reasons, or is it harsh?

Cheers

gaz

randlemarcus

9,509 posts

117 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
In your situation, I'd let the OH choose whether or not to get a pet, and if so, what sort.

Her being out all day rules out a dog in practical terms, and you serving away means you don't get an opinion (try bringing back an EOD hound, and see what happens smile )

Gazzas86

Original Poster:

1,100 posts

57 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
Yea, i pretty much ruled out a hound for the reasons above, i.e. me being away, her at work, not big enough garden and would be massivly cruel on the animal.

I think i will put the ball in her court, she has said... lets get a cat... but thats where it ends, it doesnt materialise. I don't want to 'suprise' her and have a kitten waiting for her on her birthday just incase it goes the wrong way.


Superficial

753 posts

60 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
A dog is a big no-no with those working hours, but cats are far more suited to being left to do their own thing. I wouldn't say it's harsh at all to want a pet to give the OH company, the territory comment is a bit dubious but as long as you understand the lifetime commitment of taking on a pet it's fine. Coming from an animal background I'm sure you do.

If you're going to get a cat, I'd highly recommend getting one from a rescue centre. All 5 of mine are rescues and they are so rewarding. If you can afford to do so, getting a couple is really beneficial for them so they have one of their own kind to interact with when you're not around/ OH is at work.

In terms of being house proud, me too and I am actually diagnosed with OCD! Having pets is no barrier to a clean and tidy home if you're willing to put the effort it. I have 21 pets and will not tolerate a dirty home. Keeping litter trays clean to avoid inappropriate toileting and scratch posts around the house for them to use for their claws will minimise the chance of any damage.

Gazzas86

Original Poster:

1,100 posts

57 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
Superficial said:
A dog is a big no-no with those working hours, but cats are far more suited to being left to do their own thing. I wouldn't say it's harsh at all to want a pet to give the OH company, the territory comment is a bit dubious but as long as you understand the lifetime commitment of taking on a pet it's fine. Coming from an animal background I'm sure you do.

If you're going to get a cat, I'd highly recommend getting one from a rescue centre. All 5 of mine are rescues and they are so rewarding. If you can afford to do so, getting a couple is really beneficial for them so they have one of their own kind to interact with when you're not around/ OH is at work.

In terms of being house proud, me too and I am actually diagnosed with OCD! Having pets is no barrier to a clean and tidy home if you're willing to put the effort it. I have 21 pets and will not tolerate a dirty home. Keeping litter trays clean to avoid inappropriate toileting and scratch posts around the house for them to use for their claws will minimise the chance of any damage.
Ohh many thanks for this, hadn't thought of a rescue centre, hopefully Alleviates all of the miss haps you get when they are a kitten, i.e. crapping behind the sofa like a friend of mine had the unfortunate suprise one day.

Out of interest, what would be the 'owning cost' of a cat, i'm assuming rescue's are free?, so the only thing that costs, is food, insurance, vet's etc? please exchuse my naivety.

Gaz

Advertisement

Mubby

1,176 posts

68 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
I would say a cat is the best way to go, I have had cats and dogs and probably every pet possible over the years, and a cat is independant yet loving at the same time without the demands of a dog (walks or leaving home alone etc)

I have inherited a cat when it's owners moved away, had a rescue and now have a kitten from a breeder.

If I was asked which do I prefer I really could not choose! Our boy we took is a lovely big lump who rules this house and the people in it, his every wish is our command, and we love that he is a grumpy gitt who will only give you attention when he wants to! its his charm and really quite amusing! Our rescue girl we got was 1 year approx when we got her fromn Cats Protection League, I must admit I was thinking why is she here? is she going to be bad behaved etc but it could not be further from the truth, she was a very soft and loving girl who took a little while to trust us but got there, she was put to CPL because her owner was pregnant and didn't want her near the baby, sadly we lost her last year and so now we have a 11 week old kitten obviously I love the cuteness factor and she is my baby and she came fully litter trained from the breeder aged 8 weeks. she is a terror and full of beans but enjoyable!

people will always say rescue rescue rescue, personally I say do what you want and if you would prefer a kitten to raise, then go for a kitten! you can also get kittens at CPL by the way, they just dont tend to advertise them on the websites as they would likely get taken over the older cats, but if you pop into a branch they usually have some smile

Mubby

1,176 posts

68 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
Gazzas86 said:
Out of interest, what would be the 'owning cost' of a cat, i'm assuming rescue's are free?,
Cats Protection charge £45 to home a cat, this is great value actually as they are vaccinated (£40 for kittens at vet) and neutered if old enough ( approx £70 at vet) but if kitten not old enough CPL also give you a voucher towards cost when the cat is old enough, and they are also microchipped (vet charges £25)


Gazzas86 said:
so the only thing that costs, is food, insurance, vet's etc? please exchuse my naivety.
you would also have worming and flea treatment, and food I would say costs me about £5 a week for 2 cats probably!



Edited by Mubby on Tuesday 9th October 14:04

Gazzas86

Original Poster:

1,100 posts

57 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
Mubby said:
Gazzas86 said:
Out of interest, what would be the 'owning cost' of a cat, i'm assuming rescue's are free?,
Cats Protection charge £45 to home a cat , but they are vaccinated and neutered if old enough (if not they give you a voucher towards cost when old enough) and they are also microchipped (vet charges £25)


Gazzas86 said:
so the only thing that costs, is food, insurance, vet's etc? please exchuse my naivety.
you would also have worming and flea treatment, and vaccinations, and food I would say costs me about £5 a week for 2 cats probably!
Thanks for this, and for the post above,

I shall be showing the OH the above when i get home smile

Mubby

1,176 posts

68 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
Lexi Kitten says "your welcome" laugh




Superficial

753 posts

60 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
Gazzas86 said:
Ohh many thanks for this, hadn't thought of a rescue centre, hopefully Alleviates all of the miss haps you get when they are a kitten, i.e. crapping behind the sofa like a friend of mine had the unfortunate suprise one day.

Out of interest, what would be the 'owning cost' of a cat, i'm assuming rescue's are free?, so the only thing that costs, is food, insurance, vet's etc? please exchuse my naivety.

Gaz
Rescues have lots of older cats and kittens, if you can offer a home to an adult cat or two that would be fab as they are harder to rehome. Not that there is anything wrong with them, it's just most people fall for the cute factor of a kitten.

Rescues aren't free, but the price compared to a pedigree is minimal. I can't remember what was paid for our oldest two but they were from people who rescue privately in their own home, probably around £30 each. Two more were from a small local rescue £70 each, and my CPL kitten was a case of donate what you can, but minimum suggested was £40. If you adopt from a shelter the vaccinations will be included in the price (would cost you £25-£35), and if the cat/s aren't already neutered you'll get a neutering voucher saving you money again. I always think the price we pay for animals is a pittance compared to what we get in return anyway smile

I'd budget £20-£30 a month for a good quality food, my insurance is £13 per month per cat, vet bills can run into the thousands but insurance should cover that. Be aware you may need to pay upfront and claim the cost back, less the excess. You'll also need to budget for setting up all your bits and pieces (litter trays, posts, beds) let's say £100, but you can save or splurge a lot on that figure if you wish. Also worth budgeting for occasional toys, let's say £10-£20 every couple of months.

Good luck whatever you decide smile

ali_kat

26,651 posts

107 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
If she is out all day, get 2 cats - they will keep each other company during the day & less likely to chew... If you are going to CPL, they will advise on their cats that get on well together, or same litter. They try to keep ones that have come in as a pair, together.

For some reason they are over run with ginger & black cats at the moment at my local shelter.

Accidents happen, they are quickly found & cleaned up (your nose will find it the second you walk in the door!).
Reply to Topic