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MuZiZZle

Original Poster:

490 posts

77 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
Just after a heads up here before I go see an advisor.

We own our property outright, it's in a highly rentable area but actual sales are at a virtual standstill without taking a real kick in the coconuts.

a guy at the gym suggested getting a "let to buy" mortgage to free up equity from the property we own, then use that on the place we want to buy, does this sound right?

Are there any decent forums or websites anyone can suggest regarding this?

Cheers

Sarnie

3,085 posts

96 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
Yep this is perfectly feasible, as long as the figures stack up E.g the amount you would want to raise and the subsequent LTV of the property and the expected rental return etc etc.

Drop me an email if you'd like any help/advice, I'm a Mortgage Broker smile

hamski

141 posts

111 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
Not aware of any forums or specific websites, but i can give you a bit of info.

You can remortgage your current property onto a buy-to-let deal, normally maxing out at 75% of the property value, and subject to the achievable rental income being 125% of the mortgage payments (normally based on a 5 or 6% payrate - depending on lender).

The extra money raised can then be used as a deposit for the new property. You then need to find a lender who is happy for you to retain your existing property, as some don't like it - the same information will normally be required (loan, payments, rental income) and then they will ignore the existing mortgage.

Hope this helps

keith333

88 posts

29 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
As Hamski said and the mortgage interest on the new property (the one you are going to move into) is offsettable against any rental income on your current property as long as both mortgages added together do not exceed the rented property's market value. If you google you'll find HMRC advice about capital drawdown from existing business.

MuZiZZle

Original Poster:

490 posts

77 months

[news] 
Tuesday 9th October 2012 quote quote all
Cheers guys, I think it is a possibility, just need to work out how exactly to crunch the numbers!
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PauloV12V

288 posts

138 months

[news] 
Monday 15th October 2012 quote quote all
keith333 said:
As Hamski said and the mortgage interest on the new property (the one you are going to move into) is offsettable against any rental income on your current property as long as both mortgages added together do not exceed the rented property's market value. If you google you'll find HMRC advice about capital drawdown from existing business.
That is really a top tip! well said Keith.

clarkey

860 posts

171 months

[news] 
Monday 15th October 2012 quote quote all
I did exactly this a few years ago - I worked back from a pessimistic rental valuation from an agent, took 125% of this number, and worked out how much this came to at a worst case interest rate. Assuming the amount this gives you is less than 75% of the valuation of the existing property, it's the maximum you can take out of your current property.
I found the process very quick - I think I completed on the buy to let in less than 4 weeks, and had no problems with securing another mortgage on the new house. Times may have changed a bit, but it used to be very easy!!

Toro Rosso

187 posts

42 months

[news] 
Monday 15th October 2012 quote quote all
PauloV12V said:
keith333 said:
As Hamski said and the mortgage interest on the new property (the one you are going to move into) is offsettable against any rental income on your current property as long as both mortgages added together do not exceed the rented property's market value. If you google you'll find HMRC advice about capital drawdown from existing business.
That is really a top tip! well said Keith.
Market value at the time it enters the rental business (starts being let/advertised to let), but yes otherwise a very useful piece of advice.

prand

3,391 posts

83 months

[news] 
Monday 15th October 2012 quote quote all
Toro Rosso said:
Market value at the time it enters the rental business (starts being let/advertised to let), but yes otherwise a very useful piece of advice.
I've considered this, but Mrs P reckons it would be impossible due to banks being unwilling to allow us to take the equity out of our current house, go to interest only on a buy to let mortgage with very low LTV, and put the equity as a 30%+ deposit on a new house.

Does this happen any more - are there specific conditions this can happen (I expect its big deposits and retaining high LTV in the original property)? I would like to move to a different part of the country for work and a bit of a lifestyle change, but would like to keep our current house as a rental.


prand

3,391 posts

83 months

[news] 
Monday 15th October 2012 quote quote all
clarkey said:
I did exactly this a few years ago - I worked back from a pessimistic rental valuation from an agent, took 125% of this number, and worked out how much this came to at a worst case interest rate. Assuming the amount this gives you is less than 75% of the valuation of the existing property, it's the maximum you can take out of your current property.
I found the process very quick - I think I completed on the buy to let in less than 4 weeks, and had no problems with securing another mortgage on the new house. Times may have changed a bit, but it used to be very easy!!
Sorry - ignore my earlier post - this explains what I was asking perfectly. We'd be good to aim to retain, say, 25% in the original property.

Edited by prand on Monday 15th October 10:49

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