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Original Poster:

1,469 posts

139 months

[news] 
Monday 2nd June 2003 quote quote all
I see in some adverts that repaired TVR's often are quoted as "Cat D" etc. How exactly does this system work ? Thanks.

d_drinks

1,421 posts

157 months

[news] 
Monday 2nd June 2003 quote quote all
Here goes:

Category A or B vehicles
vehicles categorised as either A or B are considered to be so severely accident damaged that they should never reappear on the road. Category A, vehicles should be destroyed completely and Category B vehicles should be dismantled for salvageable parts.

Category C or D vehicles
vehicles are those that can be repaired, but where the cost to do so meets or exceeds the stated percentage value of the vehicle.

or if you prefer:

Category D

The least damage suffered of the four categories e.g. vehicles replaced under 'new for old' schemes, vehicles written-off to minimise hire charges.

The vehicle can be safely and economically repaired either by the insurer / motor trade or by an enthusiast using cheaper parts and reduced labour costs. The PAV (Pre Accident Value) does not exceed 2,000 ( 1,000 for motorcycles), or for more expensive vehicles, where the engineer's assessed repair costs do not exceed the PAV.

Category C

Substantial damage, but repairable by an repairer or enthusiast.

The vehicle can be safely and economically repaired either by the insurer / motor trade or by an enthusiast using cheaper parts and reduced labour costs. The PAV (Pre Accident Value) exceeds 2,000 ( 1,000 for motorcycles) and the engineer's assessed repair costs exceed the PAV.

Category B

Heavy damage e.g. bent chassis

The vehicle cannot be safely and economically repaired either by the insurer / motor trade or by an enthusiast using cheaper parts and reduced labour costs. However, the vehicle contains economically salvageable parts.

Category A

A 'total loss' e.g. burn-out. The only value is the scrap metal.

The vehicle cannot be safely and economically repaired either by the insurer / motor trade or by an enthusiast using cheaper parts and reduced labour costs and there are no economically salvageable parts.

I have previously bought and repaired a Cat D car, a little bit of work was all that was needed to get the car back on the road in mint condition, so much so that the manufacture was willing to honour the warrenty left on the car (it was less than 2 yers old)
so the reackons you'll know doubt hear are baseless and generally offered by those how've never looked into it or tried it.

rat

178 posts

149 months

[news] 
Monday 2nd June 2003 quote quote all
These categories only apply to cars that have been declared a 'total loss'. It's now illegal to put a CAT A or B car back on the road. A car that has been written off due to ( repair cost and salvage) > pre-accident value but later repaired anyway would be Cat C. Cat D could mean almost anything, but it still means it's been written-off.

Take a look at the flowchart:-

www.abi.org.uk/Public/Consumer/Codes/MotorVehicleSalvage.pdf

d_drinks

1,421 posts

157 months

[news] 
Tuesday 3rd June 2003 quote quote all

rat said: These categories only apply to cars that have been declared a 'total loss'. It's now illegal to put a CAT A or B car back on the road.



Didn't I already say that


d_drinks said: Here goes:
either A or B are considered to be so severely accident damaged that they should never reappear on the road.


Whatever cat they are in they are there as they have been 'written off' there are various levels cats a-d and they were all outlined earlier !!

Incorrigible

13,667 posts

149 months

[news] 
Tuesday 3rd June 2003 quote quote all
Pay between 2/3 and 3/4 of the book price for a similar car

This isn't really fair, but it is how it works

My car is a cat D, but if the front and rear had been damaged in separate incidents, each repair would have been done on the insurance, the car would have had the same amount of repair work done but would be worth ~ 4-5k more

The difference is when I come to sell my car, I have to be honest, because the car is on the insurance register**, but a car that has been repaired after a "small" or number of small accidents can be passed off as "as new" by unscrupulous individuals (individuals work for dealers too)

**See "current cars" in my profile
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burriana500

16,328 posts

142 months

[news] 
Wednesday 4th June 2003 quote quote all
However... if you get a Cat D (or C aswell maybe?) you can have it inspected by a company called 'Autolign' - they give it a total inspection including chassis alignment. Some rumours have it that if it passes Autolign it is probably better than it came out of the factory! Anyway, the long and short of it is that if it gets a pass certificate, it will be also marked on the insurance register as "once upon a time was a Cat D but ok now" or something similar!

Well worth 250 odd quid for peace of mind.
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