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Original Poster:

15,975 posts

79 months

[news] 
Saturday 16th July 2011 quote quote all
A few threads knocking about at the moment about kettles, how you make your tea, or whether milk is acceptable, etc.
What doesn't seem to be mentioned much, or in any sort of detail, is whether or not boiling water should be used to make a cuppa. The Tefal Quick Cup produces hot - but not boiling - water.

What's the consensus? Is boiling water a must-have for making a decent cup of tea? Should it be made on the boil, or is recently boiled preferred? Or should we be using 95C water produced by the Tefal for the perfect cup?

Over to you, the afficionados of sitting on your posteriors while drinking tea all day. smile

scdan4

1,186 posts

45 months

[news] 
Saturday 16th July 2011 quote quote all
oh yes.

preferably freshly drawn (not so sure about that bit, but my gran always insisted) but definately boiling water.

You can tell the difference.

It is hard to get a decent cup of tea "out" for this reason (among others) as many places use the hot water take off from a coffee machine. Ugh.

Melman Giraffe

4,696 posts

103 months

[news] 
Saturday 16th July 2011 quote quote all
I thought you could burn tea with boiling water

tgr

583 posts

56 months

[news] 
Saturday 16th July 2011 quote quote all
it's coffee that gets burned with boiling water. tea should be made as hot as you can get it, hence warming the pot

Simpo Two

59,607 posts

150 months

[news] 
Saturday 16th July 2011 quote quote all
Boiling for tea, not boiling for coffee as I understandd it (due to the volatile oils in coffee)
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Puggit

33,242 posts

133 months

[news] 
Saturday 16th July 2011 quote quote all
Tea must must must must must be made with boiling water - there was a thread last week...

Anyone who puts milk in first is a muppet

Plotloss

67,262 posts

155 months

[news] 
Saturday 16th July 2011 quote quote all
See George Orwell's essay.

VX Foxy

3,449 posts

128 months

[news] 
Saturday 16th July 2011 quote quote all
Puggit said:
Tea must must must must must be made with boiling water - there was a thread last week...

Anyone who puts milk in first is a muppet
This. And the opposite for coffee smile

AT

13,015 posts

79 months

[news] 
Saturday 16th July 2011 quote quote all
Yes! We have one of those taps at work. It takes 1 min 20 seconds extra in the microwave to heat the water to boiling so you can get tasty tea.

Wadeski

6,080 posts

98 months

[news] 
Saturday 16th July 2011 quote quote all
depends on the tea - most green teas dont like boiling water. e.g. silver needle needs about 80 degrees C

pugwash4x4

5,875 posts

106 months

[news] 
Saturday 16th July 2011 quote quote all
iirc the perfect temp for coffee to release aromatics, create crema (obviously with pressure), but not burn the beans is 88c

the perfect temp for tea is 98c as it rehydrates the leaves properly and dissolves the aromatics

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/3016342.stm is relevant

including "take the tea to the boiling kettle"

Simpo Two

59,607 posts

150 months

[news] 
Saturday 16th July 2011 quote quote all
pugwash4x4 said:
the perfect temp for tea is 98c as it rehydrates the leaves properly and dissolves the aromatics
Dissolves?


I leave you with this clever song: www.youtube.com/watch?v=eELH0ivexKA

davepoth

23,150 posts

84 months

[news] 
Saturday 16th July 2011 quote quote all
Simpo Two said:
Dissolves?
There are lots of different "things" in tea that dissolve into the water. The nice bits leave the teabag quickly, the nasty bits later (hence stewing). For best effect for a "builder's tea", teabag in, boiling water in, milk in, (this drops the temperature sufficiently) stir to get the colour you want, then teabag out. It generally produces acceptable cups of tea regardless of how crap the tea is.

Pothole

20,260 posts

167 months

[news] 
Saturday 16th July 2011 quote quote all
boiling for sure. It's why canteen tea always tastes st

Simpo Two

59,607 posts

150 months

[news] 
Sunday 17th July 2011 quote quote all
davepoth said:
There are lots of different "things" in tea that dissolve into the water. The nice bits leave the teabag quickly, the nasty bits later (hence stewing).
Go for it; part of my degree was organic chemistry and biochemistry so I can go beyond nice and nasty smile

whippy930

167 posts

46 months

[news] 
Sunday 17th July 2011 quote quote all
Neither tea or coffee should be brewed (drawn) with boiling water- nothing to do with oils or any other such jibber jabber.... It just burns (shocks) it. Coffee should extract at between 87 and 92 degrees C. Tea a couple of degrees higher... Although the average consumer (in this part of the world) does enjoy tea to be "pipping" hot- take it from me, the flavours have not extracted as they could have if it had been brewed when a little cooler! Indeed - when "cupping" single origin coffee's or special tea's at our well renowned roastery (that's the bit that's supposed to tell you this is a bit more than a drunken opinion... :-) ) - we do so a little above Luke warm only... Flavours are at their very best here...

It's important to state this is for classic or "black" teas. Green or White tea's will certainly like being extracted (not dissolved???) at much lower temp.'s - they are very fragile!

For domestic use a good enough rule of thumb is count 30 secs after it clicks off boil and only then pour over either (black) Tea or Coffee....

All that said- make it how you like to drink it yourself dude.... :-)

HTH.

Edited by whippy930 on Sunday 17th July 04:41


Edited by whippy930 on Sunday 17th July 04:42


Edited by whippy930 on Sunday 17th July 04:44


Edited by whippy930 on Sunday 17th July 04:47

Funk

15,112 posts

94 months

[news] 
Sunday 17th July 2011 quote quote all
I had a Tefal One-Cup and it made a terrible cup of tea.

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Original Poster:

15,975 posts

79 months

[news] 
Sunday 17th July 2011 quote quote all
Funk said:
I had a Tefal One-Cup and it made a terrible cup of tea.
For how long did you let the tea draw?

Simpo Two

59,607 posts

150 months

[news] 
Sunday 17th July 2011 quote quote all
whippy930 said:
Neither tea or coffee should be brewed (drawn) with boiling water- nothing to do with oils or any other such jibber jabber.... It just burns (shocks) it.
I would suggest that oils, tannins, alkaloids many other things, are a damn sight more factual than 'shocks', which explains nothing... and burning is oxidation, if that's what you meant. Everything has proper explanation. Coffee has volatile oils in it which contribute to its flavour; boiling water causes some to evaporate. Milk is an emulsion of fat droplets in water; adding boiling water to milk can break that emulsion. ATETOD it's all molecules, so less jibber jabber please smile

whippy930

167 posts

46 months

[news] 
Sunday 17th July 2011 quote quote all
Hey simpleton two... It's your likes that stop me from posting in sections like this! It wasn't even you who used those terms above. Your a right little nettle... Go pick a fight with your nostril there... I bet you even look like mr burns too... What a dork ! Is being a dorkie nettle all you have to do on a Sunday morning?

Edited by whippy930 on Sunday 17th July 12:50

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