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Frimley111R

Original Poster:

5,832 posts

121 months

[news] 
Friday 18th November 2011 quote quote all
Being born a petrolhead, part of my youth (early-mid teens) was spent with r/c cars and I spent many hours sitting on a stool in the garage, bent over working on my cars.

As a result I developed a curve in my spine or two to be exact. I'm now round shouldered and the lower part of my spine bends in more than it should.

I have no idea how to stop this or rectify it short of learing to lie flat on my back on the floor every night with a couple of books on top of me.

Any ideas?

Isaac Hunt

7,228 posts

98 months

[news] 
Friday 18th November 2011 quote quote all
It may be something you were born with.

I have a scoliosis of the spine. If you look at photos of me at 13 it is evident. However it was not picked up until I was 27 even though I had been nagged to stand up straight all though my adolescent years.

As far as I am aware there is nothing that can be done unless you have an operation to insert a steel rod. They tend to only do that for severe cases as it is a risky procedure.

However, I have not been to an Alexander Technique practitioner as yet. I understand that they claim to be able to correct bad posture and curved spines.



marksx

2,043 posts

77 months

[news] 
Friday 18th November 2011 quote quote all
I saw a physio a while ago, due to neck pain etc. Straight away he nailed it on my bad posture. 26 year of slouching and sitting like a teenager resulted in me naturally resting like this:



He basically said the best (only?) way to cure it is with regular focused exercises. Also, taking up something like yoga/pilates to help strengthen the core muscles.

There is no quick fix. You can buy vests etc that pull you straight but they only make you rely on the vest and not fixing yourself.

It's a long, drawn out and uncomfortable process. But ultimately worth it.

Meoricin

2,653 posts

56 months

[news] 
Friday 18th November 2011 quote quote all
Deadlifts/Squats fixed my bad posture. When I started lifting I had similar issues - the strengthening of the muscles pulls everything back into place where it should be. Concentrate on proper form, and after a few months you'll start to notice you stand up/sit up straighter, and don't slouch as much.

tj2002

486 posts

80 months

[news] 
Friday 18th November 2011 quote quote all
Meoricin said:
Deadlifts/Squats fixed my bad posture. When I started lifting I had similar issues - the strengthening of the muscles pulls everything back into place where it should be. Concentrate on proper form, and after a few months you'll start to notice you stand up/sit up straighter, and don't slouch as much.
Definately this. But proper form is crucial. My posture is/was terrible but has improved noticebly since I started lifting. Still have to remember to sit up straight when I'm at work or playing the xbox though, habits are hard to break!
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didelydoo

2,711 posts

97 months

[news] 
Friday 18th November 2011 quote quote all
I'm in the process of correcting hyperlordosis from bad posture/lack of stretching and lots of heavy lifting. It had started to cause lower back pain, and I couldn't figure out what it was- 2 weeks of stretching and it's already noticeably different- tight hip flexors were the cause, deep lunges (among other stretches) the cure.

996 sps

6,071 posts

103 months

[news] 
Sunday 20th November 2011 quote quote all
Avoid the deadlifts and squats until you've had an assessment from physio or sports rehaber, may be a case of flexibility and learning to build up local muscle groups rather than global.


ClaphamGT3

4,395 posts

130 months

[news] 
Sunday 20th November 2011 quote quote all
Alexander Technique is the way forward.

I'm normally rabidly cynical about this sort of stuff but I spent about 3 months working with a practitioner about 10 years ago for back pain and posture after recovering from a big bike crash. It worked absolute wonders

Flip Martian

2,675 posts

77 months

[news] 
Sunday 20th November 2011 quote quote all
A good pilates teacher would help but avoid the classes where they do it to dance music etc in health clubs. Someone with a good knowledge of human anatomy, like my Somatics instructor would be the ideal (if you're anywhere near Milton Keynes - http://bodyiqu.com/iqu/home.html).

RJB_666

1,634 posts

82 months

[news] 
Sunday 20th November 2011 quote quote all
I've got the exact same issue. I think mine stemmed from when I injured my back and kept weight training with other muscle groups. I noticed a bit late and I'm now in the process of trying to sort it. So I train my upper back and rear deltoids more as well as core. There's an exercise called face pulls which are supposed to be helpfull.

LambdaSensor

28 posts

41 months

[news] 
Sunday 25th December 2011 quote quote all
There's a very good program for back problems of many kinds, including curvature problems at losethebackpain.com.

cervelo

53 posts

68 months

[news] 
Monday 26th December 2011 quote quote all
there is a new product out there called postureplast, www.postureplast.co.uk which is very effective and greatly reviewed by the medical profession.
Pilates is not an effective method of improving posture, and when done should be one on one initially or from a chartered physiotherapist, certainly not in a gym class in groups of more then 6.

marksx

2,043 posts

77 months

[news] 
Monday 26th December 2011 quote quote all
My physio told me stay away from products like that, as they are a 'cheat'. So to speak.

cervelo

53 posts

68 months

[news] 
Monday 26th December 2011 quote quote all
what your physio was referring to would be a traditional lumbar support belt or postural device, in which case they are correct, as all clinical evidence and medical guidelines say not use belts, tens machines, laser therapy and they do no recommend heat either. the postureplast is a taping method and one of the standard treatment modalities in physiotherapy and sport medicine

mattikake

4,508 posts

86 months

[news] 
Tuesday 27th December 2011 quote quote all
Frimley111R, if you want to take a trip up to MK, with a 'squat test' I can diagnose and pinpoint your poor posture in seconds. Usually I'd charge £35 p/h but I'll trade for a burn round MK in your car! wink 111R has to be one of my favourite cars.

Seriously, it's easy to spot and fix posture issues, but there is no quick fix. The problem may not be entirely related to your back, it could also be exacerbated by the sitting position causing your calf to shorten - this has a tendancy to pull on your hamstrings shortening them, which pull in your glutes, shortening them, which then pull on your erector spinae muscle group in your lower back, shortening them - which then in turn pulls on your mid to upper back, shortening these muscles... the net result is you're hunched over. i.e. it's not *just* about hunching over as you sit, but can also be due to simply sitting in itself.

The fix is to work your upper back all the way down to your lower legs. Some parts need strengthening, some need stretching. The same also goes for your front. (where your lower back is overly strong then the opposite happens to your abs which become lengthened and too weak)

Pilates is a great start. You need to start light if you've never properly worked on muscle building and flexibility before, especially given some muscles have atrophied, then after a few months you can try something more serious like deadlifting. There is a science and a method to postural correction. It's easier to fix than you may think.
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