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wetny

Original Poster:

442 posts

96 months

[news] 
Friday 16th March 2012 quote quote all
Hi, looking for first road bike for up to 1k on cycle to work scheme. Ribble Sportive Bianco has caught my attention, but with 105 groupset it takes me over 1k. Comes in at 999 with Campagnolo Veloce groupset. Does anyone know how they compare? Or how does campag compare with Tiagra 4600 (also under 1k). Are there any better alternatives for a grand? Have seen Cube Peleton Race 3 (105/ultegra) for 999, but really wanted a carbon frame. Do you think I would be better off looking for a triple? Any help much appreciated, as you can see I have no idea.

itsnotarace

4,149 posts

93 months

[news] 
Saturday 17th March 2012 quote quote all
There are plenty of good alu framed bikes out there so don't be so quick to discount it, a good alu frame will outperform a poor carbon one....the design of the frame is more important than the material it is made from

Can't help you on Veloce vs 105, it comes down to personal preference so go and try both and see which you prefer. For a grand budget have a look for a 2011 Cannondale CAAD or Canyon have an outlet on their website, you will get more for your money with one of those options

b2hbm

556 posts

106 months

[news] 
Saturday 17th March 2012 quote quote all
Groupsets are one of those very debatable things, what one guy values means nothing to another rider. Personally I think if you are new to riding then you won't appreciate the difference even between the cheapest and the most expensive groupset. As you pay more you generally get smoother braking & gear changes, a very slight drop in weight but the most noticeable area to a newbie is the finish. You would be equally happy with Veloce/Tiagra or even 105 because after a couple of days it will be "normal".

That's not putting you down, I honestly can't detect any difference other than finish between adjacent groupset levels either. Go from Tiagra to Ultegra and I can, but only just and that's when you strip them down - they seem to work just the same on the road.

I think your biggest choice is campag or shimano rather than the individual groupset. I ride a mixture of campag/shimano because I like the campag brake levers but I prefer the quick release of shimano brakes, and shimano cassettes are slightly cheaper to replace. Incidentally I currently have Veloce 10sp levers on one bike and they work fine. I also have some expensive campag carbon levers on another bike (forgot which groupset) and I can't tell the difference in operation. I just spent extra because I liked the looks. (like 99% of the rest of us !)

Triple chainset ? If it's very hilly where you live, then yes but otherwise I wouldn't bother because compact double chainsets have plenty of gear range to cope with new legs and moderate hills. Triples do give you lower gears and lots more options which is great for touring but I only fit one when we're going round Scotland, otherwise it's a double all the time.

Rouleur

5,051 posts

73 months

[news] 
Saturday 17th March 2012 quote quote all
I've had a play around with the Ribble bike builder thing and come up with the following:

7005 Ultralite Racing frameset
SRAM Rival group - equivalent to 105 but lighter and a fiver cheaper
Shimano R501 wheels
Continental Ultra Sport Rigid Tyres
Continental Race Inner Tube
Shimano Clipless Spd-SL R540 (105) Pedals
everything else as per the standard spec

998.10

That would be a really good bike with nothing that would need upgrading any time soon. The frameset is 200 cheaper than the one you were looking at so you can come under budget while getting a much better spec smile

dontdobends

304 posts

98 months

[news] 
Saturday 17th March 2012 quote quote all
Or a 52cm Carbon Dolan mythos with a campag chorus 11speed carbon cranks with 50-36 rings,carbon seat pin brake levers,mavic ksyrium wheels,3T bars and stem.
New and unused 1200 unwanted gift
Advertisement

wetny

Original Poster:

442 posts

96 months

[news] 
Saturday 17th March 2012 quote quote all
Looking for fifty eight. Coming to the conclusion that I probably can't go to far wrong.

Saddle bum

3,815 posts

103 months

[news] 
Sunday 18th March 2012 quote quote all
Triple v Compact?

On the continent, triples are far more popular. Compacts are sometimes used by the pros on mountain stages.

I find, as a normal (relatively elderly) mortal that a triple fulfills all my requirements. Moderate increments right through the range and the bottom end extremes prevent the indignity of walking on several occasions throughout the year. I have never had problems setting up and using a triple.

Shimano v Campagnolo? I would rather walk than ride Shimano. Forza Campagnolo!

phucks1976

205 posts

101 months

[news] 
Sunday 18th March 2012 quote quote all
Just sold a bike with veloce and moved to Ultegra. Veloce was much nicer to use.

mcelliott

2,382 posts

65 months

[news] 
Sunday 18th March 2012 quote quote all
I don't know if the OP can stretch his pennies a bit further and consider Campag Athena - I've got the new generation version on my Planet X and in fact I'm very impressed with it and it sits, I'm guessing, somewhere between 105 and Ultegra. I run a Dura Ace equipped bike along side it and I'd say there's very little difference in quality - i.e. shifts and general feel, but way better looking than the Shimano groupset.

Roman

1,908 posts

103 months

[news] 
Sunday 18th March 2012 quote quote all
I found Ribble's 'special edition' builds are better value than the 'bike builder' options and it's easy to ebay the parts you intend to upgrade afterwards. I'd certainly upgrade the tyres to folding ones such as Vittorias.

You can get a Sportive with Sram Rival, wide ratio cassette & upgraded ITM wheels for just over 950 - great frame & fork (I've ridden one) and I'd rate Rival better than either 105 or Veloce:
http://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/specialedition.asp?a...

If you're heavy or intend to tackle some big climbs a compact 50/34 with 11-28 cassette will give you the same range as a triple with 11-25 and you really won't notice the couple of very slightly wider ratios on the of the lower three gears unless you spend all your time in the Alps.

TonyHetherington

31,816 posts

134 months

[news] 
Monday 19th March 2012 quote quote all
Saddle bum said:
On the continent, triples are far more popular
They have some proper hills there though! biggrin

Parsnip

2,388 posts

72 months

[news] 
Monday 19th March 2012 quote quote all
Under 1000, alu frame and carbon fork is the only way to go IMO.

Planet-x and the like do some ok stuff, but would take a old alloy cervelo over a new PX carbon anyday.

With regards to the gruppo - any chance you can try them? I used to swear by Shimano because of the way it fits my hands - tried a bike with Red and hated it with a passion. Now using Record and it is growing on me, the hoods are a bit less comfy than Shimano ones, but the bling factor and the needless ability to shift half a cassette in one go make it worth it smile

Edited by Parsnip on Monday 19th March 11:06

shouldbworking

4,011 posts

96 months

[news] 
Monday 19th March 2012 quote quote all
Decathlon have the btwin facet 5 - carbon + 105 for a grand.

I have the veloce groupset on my ribble winter and its not given me any grief in the about 4000 miles or so I've done on it. Find it very nice to use.

MadDad

3,004 posts

145 months

[news] 
Monday 19th March 2012 quote quote all
I was having the same discussion (alu v Carbon) in my LBS last week. The question if you could only have one bike for everything, carbon or alu? was raised, the overwhelming vote was alu, better feedback, nicer ride, more responsive although if it were carbon/alu/Ti everyone agreed Ti!

I have a Alu/Carbon bike (Felt F75) and love it, frame is nice and light and responsive and the carbon seat stays soak up enough of the road noise to make it comfy on long rides. I had a spin on a mates Kuota Kharma, nice bike, light but somehow felt a little dead by comparison. I can see the merits of a carbon if you are buying a bike solely for TTs or road racing but if this is your first bike and will be a do-it-all I would give serious thought to a decent alu over a bottom end carbon.

As for the groupset, I have a 105 on both my bikes and cant complain does what it says on the tin and does it quite well. Gear changes are crisp and positive, easy to fix/service/adjust yourself and not difficult to get parts for.

pablo

11,916 posts

157 months

[news] 
Monday 19th March 2012 quote quote all
Can someone explain to me what "bottom end carbon" is?

okgo

23,122 posts

82 months

[news] 
Monday 19th March 2012 quote quote all
Cheap carbon bikes?

There's little doubt that the cheapest frame Ribble do is going to be less stiff and heavier than the best alu frame out there.

The real question is what difference is it going to make if you spend your cycling time pootling around at 17mph? none.

Justayellowbadge

33,428 posts

126 months

[news] 
Monday 19th March 2012 quote quote all
My Nero Corsa (previous gen 1k carbon from Ribble) was specced with Veloce.

They build to order though, and reserve the right to substitute, so it turned up with pretty much 50:50 Veloce and Athena, which was nice.

Gizmo!

17,991 posts

93 months

[news] 
Monday 19th March 2012 quote quote all
Was in Evans on Saturday. Test rode a CAAD8 Tiagra, but they had a Trek 2.1 with full 105 in there for £999. Looked lovely in matt white with blue bits.

NorthDave

745 posts

116 months

[news] 
Monday 19th March 2012 quote quote all
For what it is worth I ride a Ribble Sportive New and although slightly more than £1k in my spec (Ultegra and carbon bits) I love it. I'm due a new bike through work and can't even justify changing it.

Course, I do only pootle around at 17mph or so!

okgo

23,122 posts

82 months

[news] 
Monday 19th March 2012 quote quote all
I must add, that wasn't meant as a downer. The only time I've felt like I was really benefiting from my nice bike with aero wheels was in a road race where the pace was 25 mph for two hours.

Even on fast club runs I find my current training bike (similar level to the one you mention) is more than enough, both comfort wise and stiffness etc.

Also worth mentioning that the difference between 105 and ultegra shifting is pretty much tiny.
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