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TonyHetherington

Original Poster:

31,840 posts

136 months

[news] 
Friday 14th December 2012 quote quote all
Hi all

Looking at getting some driving glasses for my dad for night time driving. He had his eyes corrected about 8 weeks ago (the operation that's similar to a cataract op), and has found that driving at night he gets a lot of glare. He was warned this could be a side effect.

Will the yellow-tinted glasses solve this? And if so, does anyone have recommendations, is there a certain type etc.?

Thanks!

SLCZ3

899 posts

91 months

[news] 
Friday 14th December 2012 quote quote all
Get some light tinted, polarised sunglasses, does the job and cheap enough.

g3org3y

9,247 posts

77 months

[news] 
Friday 14th December 2012 quote quote all
If glare is an issue, polarised glasses might be a better option.

TonyHetherington

Original Poster:

31,840 posts

136 months

[news] 
Friday 14th December 2012 quote quote all
Ah I see so polarised rather than yellow is what I'm after?

I assume you can get polarised but non_tinted? Thanks smile

TonyRPH

6,390 posts

54 months

[news] 
Friday 14th December 2012 quote quote all
You don't want polarised specs for night driving, and as I understand it, they are not legal for night driving anyway.

I got a pair of prescription specs with yellow tinted lenses, and an "Ultraclear"* coating (from Specsavers - ask and they will advise).

The difference at night is absolutely amazing.

My problem is slow recovery from bright lights - e.g. if I'm blinded, it takes 1 - 2 secs to get my vision back fully.

These glasses cured that problem, and also eradicates the burning sensation caused by some HIDs.

Polarised lenses cure reflections from dashboard, and wet roads in daytime driving. They offer no benefit at night that I could see!

  • IIRC it was Ultraclear.
ETA: They are called "Ultradrive" and there are day and night versions.

See here for further info.

Disclaimer: I have no affiliation with Specsavers - just a satisfied customer.



Edited by TonyRPH on Friday 14th December 13:38

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Easternlight

1,204 posts

30 months

[news] 
Friday 14th December 2012 quote quote all
My other half has just got a pair of special prescription glasses for night driving because of the glare from headlights, They have a very pale yellow tint to them,so pale you'd not think it would do anything, but she says they are ten times better than her ordinary glasses.

LeoSayer

4,725 posts

130 months

[news] 
Friday 14th December 2012 quote quote all
Google Serengeti sunglasses.

TonyHetherington

Original Poster:

31,840 posts

136 months

[news] 
Friday 14th December 2012 quote quote all
TonyRPH said:
Disclaimer: I have no affiliation with Specsavers - just a satisfied customer.
Brilliant, thanks

DKL

2,388 posts

108 months

[news] 
Friday 14th December 2012 quote quote all
Some slightly dodgy advice here and as its driving I'll correct it.
There are no tinted glasses that make any improvement at all for driving at night. Any tint will reduce the amount of light you can use which at night is the last thing you want. Yellow lenses emphasize that portion of the spectrum but only where there is light, so in lit areas. This can give the impression of better contrast perception but that's all it is an impression. There is no work that shows any actual performance accentuation at all whatever the multiples might have you believe.
Where there are no lights all it does is make it darker which may just be the difference between seeing someone in the dark as they step out in front of you and not.

Drivewear lenses (the commercial name for those mentioned above from Specsavers) are basically the same thing. They work well in the light but again not at night. Polarised lenses must, by definition, reduce the available light by 50% so you can't get clear, polarised lenses.

First thing to do if he has had clear lens extractions (assuming that's what it is) is to get his eyes tested as whilst his vision may be much better than it was it doesn't necessarily mean its as good as it can be and optical blur is what is causing the "glare". If he needs even a small correction then he must have MAR (antireflection) lenses otherwise all the advantage of the prescription will be undone.

Sadly it may be that there is a little opacity still there which causes the problem (posterior capsule issues) which the surgeons may be able to fix with a laser.

Best of luck and if I can help any more drop me a line.

Don't waste your money on what is little more than snake oil.


TonyRPH

6,390 posts

54 months

[news] 
Friday 14th December 2012 quote quote all
DKL said:
...
Don't waste your money on what is little more than snake oil.
...
I note that you're an optometrist, so who am I to argue...

But I can only report my own experience (and that of my wife) and we have both found the glasses we got from Specsavers to work really well.

There is very little noticeable colour change at night (they are only intended to be worn after dark), and they really do reduce glare from headlights of all types.

A friend of ours also got the same glasses based on our recommendation, and he too finds them really helpful as night.

I am interested to know why you think they are snake oil - in your professional opinion as an optometrist?

DKL said:
...
Any tint will reduce the amount of light you can use which at night is the last thing you want. Yellow lenses emphasize that portion of the spectrum but only where there is light, so in lit areas. This can give the impression of better contrast perception but that's all it is an impression.
...
If I read the above correctly...

It's not about the contrast for me - it's about the dazzle from oncoming vehicles, and I really do find these glasses effective at reducing glare. Obviously (as you state) there is some perceptible light attenuation (there would have to be) but in town and general driving, there is more than enough ambient light to overcome this. If it was a problem - they wouldn't be legal.

Edited by TonyRPH on Friday 14th December 16:43

DKL

2,388 posts

108 months

[news] 
Friday 14th December 2012 quote quote all
Tony,
For the reasons given above. There is no work that shows any actual improvement in vision or reduction in measurable glare at night. If it was as simple as that (a light yellow tint on a plastic lens is really simple) then we'd all be doing it and its not new.
I didn't know ssavers were advocating it and I'm surprised they do - yellow glasses are usually something you buy from the back of the Sun!

It will make lights less bright as its a tint but it makes everything else that much darker too. I couldn't recommend them.

eta - from the aa
http://www.theaa.com/public_affairs/reports/drivin...

and an fairly reliable US optical site

http://www.laramyk.com/resources/education/dispens...

Edited by DKL on Friday 14th December 16:49

DKL

2,388 posts

108 months

[news] 
Friday 14th December 2012 quote quote all
TonyRPH said:
If I read the above correctly...

It's not about the contrast for me - it's about the dazzle from oncoming vehicles, and I really do find these glasses effective at reducing glare. Obviously (as you state) there is some perceptible light attenuation (there would have to be) but in town and general driving, there is more than enough ambient light to overcome this. If it was a problem - they wouldn't be legal.

Edited by TonyRPH on Friday 14th December 16:43
Personally I'd say that the fix and the problem are not best matched. If there is an issue with light scatter (which is what will cause the dazzle or glare) then can this be fixed rather than just dimming everything down.
Tints darker than 75-80% transmission aren't legal at night.

LongLiveTazio

2,653 posts

83 months

[news] 
Friday 14th December 2012 quote quote all
Sorry to hijack but as you're a knowledgable chap can I ask if the classic 'yellow tint' is the same snake oil for sports eyewear that claims improvements in target acquisition, for example?

Gixer

4,195 posts

134 months

[news] 
Friday 14th December 2012 quote quote all
Some of the Moto GP riders use yellow tints on their visors when racing in the wet - apparently it makes seeing through the spray and picking out standing water easier. No idea if it would help at night though but no harm in trying them out is there.

Lordglenmorangie

2,791 posts

91 months

[news] 
Friday 14th December 2012 quote quote all
More expert opinion, don't let your Dad wear yellow glasses as he will look a knob biggrin

xreyuk

627 posts

31 months

[news] 
Friday 14th December 2012 quote quote all
Is he sure it's not short/long sightedness?

I have driving glasses for night, but I have problem with glare due to my short sightedness, they're standard lenses.

TonyRPH

6,390 posts

54 months

[news] 
Friday 14th December 2012 quote quote all
DKL said:
Personally I'd say that the fix and the problem are not best matched. If there is an issue with light scatter (which is what will cause the dazzle or glare) then can this be fixed rather than just dimming everything down.
Tints darker than 75-80% transmission aren't legal at night.
I have been assured these glasses are legal for nigh driving.

Given our different experiences - I do hesitate to wonder if we're discussing the same product.


ETA:

Laramy K Optical said:
While yellow lenses can be effective for foggy or hazy daylight conditions, they are not effective against headlight glare and should not be worn at dusk or night. If glare from headlights is a problem, the first step should be a thorough eye examination, as this could be an early indication of cataracts or other medical conditions.
I can state quite categorically that the glasses I have are indeed *very* effective against glare at night.

Wearing them at dusk is not an option - they only become effective in darkness.

And I have my eyes tested every two years (more regular testing has not been required) - I'm 52 btw.

I have an astigmatism and slight correction (I don't remember the exact figures) for distance and reading.



Edited by TonyRPH on Friday 14th December 19:22

Easternlight

1,204 posts

30 months

[news] 
Friday 14th December 2012 quote quote all
DKL said:
Some slightly dodgy advice here and as its driving I'll correct it.
There are no tinted glasses that make any improvement at all for driving at night.
If this is true then why does my other half find the ones made for her by her optometrist seem so effective to her?
Not doubting you but seems strange that two professional optometrist's should have differing ideas.
Is she experiencing a placebo effect?
If we have payed for expensive "snake oil" it seems to work

joebongo

1,385 posts

61 months

[news] 
Friday 14th December 2012 quote quote all

DKL

2,388 posts

108 months

[news] 
Friday 14th December 2012 quote quote all
LongLiveTazio said:
Sorry to hijack but as you're a knowledgable chap can I ask if the classic 'yellow tint' is the same snake oil for sports eyewear that claims improvements in target acquisition, for example?
Absolutely - lots of different tints produce good results in the daylight (however dull it may seem) and lots of big companies put good money into the R+D hence you see high profile sportsmen and women using them. These guys aren't playing.
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