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im

Original Poster:

34,302 posts

101 months

[news] 
Friday 6th December 2013 quote quote all
Hi chaps

I have an old Golf that I use as a snotter (for trips to the dump etc) and just recently there's been ice forming overnight on the windscreen inside the car as well as outside.

I'm aware that this means I've got moisture getting into the car through a leaky sunroof or somewhere but it's not immediately apparent where. Before the cold nights set in I was getting a very misty internal windscreen overnight anyway.

As the cars reliable but only worth perhaps £300 I don't want to put it into a garage and get a bill for more than the car is worth so...my question is...

What can I put inside the car that will soak up the moisture from the air and stop this ice forming? I've heard 'salt' but there must be a better solution surely?

Cheers in advance for any advice.

im

tomsugden

735 posts

112 months

[news] 
Friday 6th December 2013 quote quote all
You can buy smokebombs that you put inside the car, and then shut the doors. Wait until you can see where the smoke is coming out, and Bob's your mother's brother.

Rice or cat litter may help absorb it.

deltashad

4,905 posts

81 months

[news] 
Friday 6th December 2013 quote quote all
Rice?

The Game

2,157 posts

65 months

[news] 
Friday 6th December 2013 quote quote all
deltashad said:
Rice?
Dry, not uncle Ben's boil in the bag.

Myc

243 posts

45 months

[news] 
Friday 6th December 2013 quote quote all
As above, pour a bag of dry rice into a sock and place it in the car.

Should have absorbed the moisture after a few days.
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Bluebarge

2,788 posts

62 months

[news] 
Friday 6th December 2013 quote quote all
deltashad said:
Rice?
absorbs water - great way to rescue a drowned mobile phone - stick it in a jar of rice for a few days and the rice draws out all the moisture.

But not if its Muller Rice.

hornetrider

47,881 posts

89 months

[news] 
Friday 6th December 2013 quote quote all
Go to a camping shop and pick up a moisture absorbant. It looks like a big stuffed sock... it's filled with dessicant and will absorb any moisture in the car.

Job jobbed, for less than a tenner.

deltashad

4,905 posts

81 months

[news] 
Friday 6th December 2013 quote quote all
A bit pricey, I was thinking tesco own saver brand

ewenm

27,006 posts

129 months

[news] 
Friday 6th December 2013 quote quote all
Gather up the little silica gel/crystals packets you get packaged with electronics and leave them in the car.

Or rice...

406highlander

46 posts

17 months

[news] 
Friday 6th December 2013 quote quote all
It's an old car, so think of perishable items - door seals, sunroof seals, etc. Also not sure if your Golf is has a bonded windscreen or one that is rubber-sealed. A close visual inspection of these items will show if they've hardened and become brittle and cracked, or if they're torn or have been pinched flat.

Some cars also have a plastic sheet behind the door cards (either in front of or behind the sound insulation material) that helps keep moisture out. If that's been damaged, that can let moisture in.

If there is a pollen filter, replace it if it hasn't been done recently, and that its compartment is clear of dead/moist/rotting vegetation (leaves, etc), as this can cause moisture to enter the cabin through the air vents in the dash.

If the door frames are warped slightly, the windows might not be completely closing and forming a tight seal.

As someone else said, hire a smoke machine, put it inside your car and switch it on; watch for smoke leaking through any panel gaps or rubber seals. Repair/replace whatever leaks.

Scantily

236 posts

55 months

[news] 
Friday 6th December 2013 quote quote all
Dry rice in a sock won't help you, i tried that last year and it did nothing. My car has the same problem and the best fix is to buy one of these - http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/PINGI-450G-XL-RECHARGEAB...

I bought one recently and no more condensation!

JulesB

535 posts

43 months

[news] 
Friday 6th December 2013 quote quote all
Set the car on fire, the heat should cause any moisture to evaporate, problem solved!

If that is not feasible then buy an MX5, so I have been told it is the fix for all lifes problems.

RenesisEvo

2,322 posts

103 months

[news] 
Friday 6th December 2013 quote quote all
The main reason why you get so much moisture in the car, which then freezes onto the inside of the windscreen, is because you (& any passengers) sit in the car breathing out lots of water vapour, which adds to the moisture in the air. Because it's winter and you have the heaters on, the warm air in the car while you're sat in it can hold more water vapour than when it's colder. So when you turn off the car and leave it overnight, that moisture you have breathed out now condenses on the inside as the air cools down. Which then freezes on the inside windscreen if it gets cold enough.

Turn off the heater and open the windows a bit before you arrive at your destination to replace the warm, moist air with cold, dry air from outside. Or turn the heater over to cold. Admittedly, you will now be cold, but you can't have it all. Alternatively, if the extra fuel use doesn't concern you, use air conditioning when you have the heater on, which should dry the air out in the car. Then you won't have so much moisture in the first place. If you have a leak or a puddle that won't help matters - check for blocked drain holes, and footwells and boot for puddles.

freakynessless

405 posts

66 months

[news] 
Friday 6th December 2013 quote quote all
I tried silca gel and cat litter a few weeks ago and it didnt help at all.
I was able to locate and stop the issue on my car then dry it out with a hair dryer.
In your postition would try a smoke bomb to locate the issue or try a dehumidifier.

Greg66

2,596 posts

62 months

[news] 
Friday 6th December 2013 quote quote all
im said:
I'm aware that this means I've got moisture getting into the car through a leaky sunroof or somewhere but it's not immediately apparent where.
Have a look under the carpets in the front footwells. Golfs have a drainage point under the bonnet somewhere around the base of the windscreen. If it gets blocked, it can overflow into the cabin.

Had to extract a couple of completely sodden pieces of foam padding from there once.

Otherwise, buy a dehumidifier and leave it running in the car for a couple of hours. Cures the problem, but not the cause.

crossy67

725 posts

63 months

[news] 
Friday 6th December 2013 quote quote all
When you get in the car be sure to remove your wet/snow covered shoes. These will carry in loads of water. Never let your car get hot inside, hot air can hold more moisture and because all things are equal, will suck moisture in from outside when you open the door/window. Stop breathing and exhaling moisture laden breath.
Your car is not a sealed box so what is outside will come inside. If it was sealed you'd suffocate on long journeys.

It's futile to try to stop moist air inside a car or a house, when it's damp outside it will become damp inside, as the air cools it needs somewhere cold to dump all that water it can no longer hold.

A few helpful tips though. Put a dehumidifier in the car to dry out carpets. If you have had a water leak the water will be soaked up by the sound proofing, this stuff is rubber backed and the rubber forms a barrier between the water and atmosphere so it's very slow to dry.

Use your aircon, the condenser inside your aircon will condense the moisture out of the air in the car and dispose of it outside the car.

Park in a sheltered place.


RicksAlfas

6,116 posts

128 months

[news] 
Friday 6th December 2013 quote quote all
See if there is a trough under the scuttle. My wife's 147 used to steam up and it turned out the drain from this trough had become blocked with leaves and it filled up with water. Guess where the heater air intake was...? rolleyes

jhfozzy

1,043 posts

74 months

[news] 
Friday 6th December 2013 quote quote all
Greg66 said:
im said:
I'm aware that this means I've got moisture getting into the car through a leaky sunroof or somewhere but it's not immediately apparent where.
Have a look under the carpets in the front footwells. Golfs have a drainage point under the bonnet somewhere around the base of the windscreen. If it gets blocked, it can overflow into the cabin.

Had to extract a couple of completely sodden pieces of foam padding from there once.

Otherwise, buy a dehumidifier and leave it running in the car for a couple of hours. Cures the problem, but not the cause.
^^ This.

It's quite common at this time of year to get blocked drain.

Air [for the blowers] usually comes into the car via the vent just below the windscreen. To stop water coming into the car, they put a small tray with a drain just below the inlet. If this drain blocks [leaf mulch, dust etc.], the tray fills with water until it reaches the level of the air inlet and then flows into the car.

You can usually spot the drain with a torch through the slats below the windscreen and then use a long screwdriver to push the blockage through or remove the scuttle panel as in the pic below.


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