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Kentish

Original Poster:

14,875 posts

120 months

[news] 
Sunday 1st January 2006 quote quote all
Hi All!

And a very happy 2006 to everyone

I've been redecorating over the past few months and have been noticing that the white gloss Crown paint has gone very yellow within a matter of months. It looks like the paint has been there for several years (it's that bad).

Anyone used any good gloss white that has remained white?

TIA

puggit

33,340 posts

134 months

[news] 
Sunday 1st January 2006 quote quote all
Stop smoking?

love machine

7,609 posts

121 months

[news] 
Sunday 1st January 2006 quote quote all
Is this interior paint? It's either photo-degradation by UV or general oxidation due to crap paint chemistry. I could suggest a number of additives to stop this happening but you may as well just use some epoxy 2 pack (yes) if you want your white to stay white. How many old fibreglass boats do you see which have yellowed?

Cossie.

7,977 posts

135 months

[news] 
Sunday 1st January 2006 quote quote all
I've found that water based varnishes are non-yellowing so does the same apply to white paint? I've used water based paints because of their low odour but had to apply at least 4 coats to each side of a door to get adequate coverage (32 applications in all...arghhhh! ).

Stu247

780 posts

132 months

[news] 
Sunday 1st January 2006 quote quote all
Water based Gloss is the way to go !
B&Q's "Everwhite" is the stuff.
The coverage is not as good as the oil based gloss but it does stay whiter for longer and does not smell as bad
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rich 36

13,739 posts

152 months

[news] 
Sunday 1st January 2006 quote quote all
I'm a reformend smoker, and quite aware of our once white ceilings going steadilly niconti-eige
ban all smoking in the house at once should do it

Parrot of Doom

23,075 posts

120 months

[news] 
Sunday 1st January 2006 quote quote all
Personally I can't stand the water based stuff. Ever tried to get it off, once its down? Bloody impossible, it just soaks into the wood.

russian rocket

843 posts

122 months

[news] 
Sunday 1st January 2006 quote quote all
b+q everwhite stays white,

however it seems more prone to getting cipped, dirty, etc and is just horrible to put on, gone back to dulux

tvrgit

8,177 posts

138 months

[news] 
Sunday 1st January 2006 quote quote all
Satin white seems to resist yellowing better than gloss.

Wacky Racer

22,316 posts

133 months

[news] 
Sunday 1st January 2006 quote quote all
Stu247 said:
Water based Gloss is the way to go !
B&Q's "Everwhite" is the stuff.
The coverage is not as good as the oil based gloss but it does stay whiter for longer and does not smell as bad




www.ofcom.org.uk/static/archive/itc/itc_publications/complaints_reports/advertising_complaints/show_complaint.asp-ad_complaint_id=249.html





yertis

12,359 posts

152 months

[news] 
Sunday 1st January 2006 quote quote all
That's just a complaint base on a technicality though isn't it. I still think Everwhite is pretty good, though I agree it can be a bit of a bitch to get on evenly on some surfaces.

blaineuk

2,401 posts

133 months

[news] 
Sunday 1st January 2006 quote quote all
usa white not brilliant white, will hold it's colour longer and always use dulux/crown oil based, but water based is the future due to global warming

sparkythecat

5,145 posts

141 months

[news] 
Sunday 1st January 2006 quote quote all
International Paint's white yacht enamel keeps its colour very well.

jessica

6,307 posts

138 months

[news] 
Sunday 1st January 2006 quote quote all
Stu247 said:
Water based Gloss is the way to go !
B&Q's "Everwhite" is the stuff.
The coverage is not as good as the oil based gloss but it does stay whiter for longer and does not smell as bad


I hate it
it peels off and is a pain then you have to strip the whole item before you can re gloss.
just bought some really expensive dulux satinwood white.
I have found the old 1930's doors go yellow quickly and the new ones stay white..
maybe its the lead undercoat that does it my nieghbour has the same problem, and none of us smoke. although we do have a real fire.

Wacky Racer

22,316 posts

133 months

[news] 
Sunday 1st January 2006 quote quote all
I think the future is water based, rather than oil based paints, however something has to be done to prevent the finish from chipping very easily.....It is a definite advantage being able to clean the brushes out under running water.....

As regards the original question try "International" radiator enamel.........

Kentish

Original Poster:

14,875 posts

120 months

[news] 
Tuesday 3rd January 2006 quote quote all
Hi folks and happy new year!

Thanks for all the replies.

I agree the water based white interior paint doesn't yellow but I found the finish very poor, mainly because it appears to dry instantly making the brush drag. It did with the one I used but I can't recall what make that was. I eneded up having to sand it off and repaint it with ordinary gloss.

I don't think I tried B&Q ever white so I may give that a go.

I've also found that drippy gloss brilliant white yellows a lot less than the non-drip version of the same brand.

Thanks again.

muley

1,431 posts

167 months

[news] 
Tuesday 3rd January 2006 quote quote all
jessica said:
Stu247 said:
Water based Gloss is the way to go !
B&Q's "Everwhite" is the stuff.
The coverage is not as good as the oil based gloss but it does stay whiter for longer and does not smell as bad


I hate it
it peels off and is a pain then you have to strip the whole item before you can re gloss.
just bought some really expensive dulux satinwood white.
I have found the old 1930's doors go yellow quickly and the new ones stay white..
maybe its the lead undercoat that does it my nieghbour has the same problem, and none of us smoke. although we do have a real fire.


I have been using the dulux satinwood white for decades now and I find it doesn't go yellow, I like the non-glossy finish and it seems to be very durable. It isn't water based though. It's my preferred choice for woodwork and radiators, and a couple of pro decorators I know swear by it.

Jim B

>> Edited by muley on Tuesday 3rd January 10:20

Flat in Fifth

23,837 posts

137 months

[news] 
Tuesday 3rd January 2006 quote quote all
muley said:
jessica said:
Stu247 said:
Water based Gloss is the way to go !
B&Q's "Everwhite" is the stuff.
The coverage is not as good as the oil based gloss but it does stay whiter for longer and does not smell as bad

I hate it
it peels off and is a pain then you have to strip the whole item before you can re gloss.
just bought some really expensive dulux satinwood white.
I have found the old 1930's doors go yellow quickly and the new ones stay white..
maybe its the lead undercoat that does it my nieghbour has the same problem, and none of us smoke. although we do have a real fire.

I have been using the dulux satinwood white for decades now and I find it doesn't go yellow, I like the non-glossy finish and it seems to be very durable. It isn't water based though. It's my preferred choice for woodwork and radiators, and a couple of pro decorators I know swear by it.

Another vote for Dulux Satinwood white,though I do like a bit of Dulux Trade Gloss for the finish though. Just that the pong gets on your wick after a few days.

nubbin

6,809 posts

164 months

[news] 
Tuesday 3rd January 2006 quote quote all
I painted a exterior window frame with International "Ranch paint" white gloss about 10 years ago. It's still white, hasn't peeled or flaked, and the wood looks as good as new. Top stuff IMHO!

Kentish

Original Poster:

14,875 posts

120 months

[news] 
Wednesday 4th January 2006 quote quote all
I've decided to go with a light grey/taupe colour in satin instead of the gloss white. This will be a nice contrast (but not too dark) to the white walls. All dado rails, skirtings and doors will be this colour. I tried it in the lounge and it looks nice, rather classy with the radiator covers in the same colour too.
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