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gsfrontera

Original Poster:

503 posts

85 months

[news] 
Thursday 8th May 2008 quote quote all
I have an interview next week for a job as a recruitment consultant but salary has not yet been discussed.

Does anyone know what sort of wage I can expect from this type of job.

Thanks.

amir_j

3,579 posts

86 months

[news] 
Thursday 8th May 2008 quote quote all
Basic + bonus dependent on how slimy you are willing to be

HTH

okgo

23,147 posts

83 months

[news] 
Thursday 15th May 2008 quote quote all
gsfrontera said:
I have an interview next week for a job as a recruitment consultant but salary has not yet been discussed.

Does anyone know what sort of wage I can expect from this type of job.

Thanks.
Basic typically 18-24k and then commision that depends on their fee

Bibs_LEF

740 posts

92 months

[news] 
Wednesday 28th May 2008 quote quote all
My old company paid 10% commission on the first 10k/month, 20% on the next 5k and 50% of anything over that. Good consultants billed up to £40k/month (average fee of 8-10k is 4/5 deals/month) which with your basic is over £15k/month wages!

BigAlinEmbra

1,629 posts

97 months

[news] 
Wednesday 28th May 2008 quote quote all
Bibs_LEF said:
My old company paid 10% commission on the first 10k/month, 20% on the next 5k and 50% of anything over that. Good consultants billed up to £40k/month (average fee of 8-10k is 4/5 deals/month) which with your basic is over £15k/month wages!
£15k a month?! Struggling to believe that. How can you possibly make a margin of 50% on someone? FT employee and you charge 6 months salary and there's no overhead attached?!
I honestly think recruitment consultants that earn £180k a year a few and far between.
Most of the ones I've spoken to have had basics in the region of £20-30k and with commission they've been in the £30-40k range.
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okgo

23,147 posts

83 months

[news] 
Thursday 29th May 2008 quote quote all
Its possible in every sales job with uncapped to earn silly money.

A girl at my last work was on well over 400k as an estate agent.. but you would think it was possible untill its done.

Toobin

1,206 posts

119 months

[news] 
Thursday 29th May 2008 quote quote all
There are always exceptions. I did a few years in IT rec as a consultant then a manager. Realistically you are looking at 45-50 in your first year. I did have a consultant working for me earning in excess of 250k but he got lucky with a big client, slowing off for him now though. In the crazy days in 2000 I recall most of the team clearing around £15k a month for permanent IT staff but it's nothing like that now, hence the change of direction. Be realistic, there is an element of luck involved in getting that right client, for most it can be a struggle hence the revolving door culture.

Justin Miles

193 posts

76 months

[news] 
Thursday 29th May 2008 quote quote all
Your income will also depend on whether you're involved with temps and perms, the market your working in, and your location. Check out the competition and try to find out... many sales guys like to brag about how much they earn (remember to knock of 10-20% as "additional brag factor bonus"!), so it could be worth just asking one of them!

Best of luck

Justin

E36GUY

4,276 posts

103 months

[news] 
Thursday 29th May 2008 quote quote all
The temporary or contract market is the most lucrative and also faster moving. I would avoid perm like the plague. Too frustrating and long winded.

Basics - £18-28k depending on experience. Then percentages of your monthly GP are paid in commission. There is usually a threashold to cross before you are eligable for commission, typically £5k/month then it goes on a sliding scale upwards as your figures grow.

An example...
0-5000 - 0%
5k - 15k - 10%
15k - 20k - 15%
20k+ - 20%

So, based on that model, if you billed £25k you'd earn £2750 on top of your basic. The above is only a very rough guide. All companies have different schemes in place but they are usually along those lines.

GP is calculated on the margin you make on a contractor. So, pay them say 100/day and charge them to your client at £120/day, the £20 difference is your margin. The IT contract market is tough but lucrative. You can make £200/day margins+ in that market so even just one of them nearly gets you over your initial threshold. Then get a few more on the books and along comes the commission.

Here we have temp consultants billing over £100k/month so go figure. But they are the really really exceptional ones!

My advice - work for a reputable company with a well known name. Don't work for XYZ Ltd that no-ones ever heard of. It's an uphill battle when you are doing your sales approaches because the competition is stiff.

Justin Miles

193 posts

76 months

[news] 
Thursday 29th May 2008 quote quote all
Sounds like good advice from a guy who knows!

Bibs_LEF

740 posts

92 months

[news] 
Tuesday 3rd June 2008 quote quote all
BigAlinEmbra said:
£15k a month?! Struggling to believe that. How can you possibly make a margin of 50% on someone? FT employee and you charge 6 months salary and there's no overhead attached?!
I honestly think recruitment consultants that earn £180k a year a few and far between.
Most of the ones I've spoken to have had basics in the region of £20-30k and with commission they've been in the £30-40k range.
Your getting confused between the fee charged to the client and the commission earned by the consultant on their billings.

BigAlinEmbra

1,629 posts

97 months

[news] 
Tuesday 3rd June 2008 quote quote all
Bibs_LEF said:
BigAlinEmbra said:
£15k a month?! Struggling to believe that. How can you possibly make a margin of 50% on someone? FT employee and you charge 6 months salary and there's no overhead attached?!
I honestly think recruitment consultants that earn £180k a year a few and far between.
Most of the ones I've spoken to have had basics in the region of £20-30k and with commission they've been in the £30-40k range.
Your getting confused between the fee charged to the client and the commission earned by the consultant on their billings.
Am I? This reads very much like you said £15k a month wages.

Bibs_LEF said:
My old company paid 10% commission on the first 10k/month, 20% on the next 5k and 50% of anything over that. Good consultants billed up to £40k/month (average fee of 8-10k is 4/5 deals/month) which with your basic is over £15k/month wages!

okgo

23,147 posts

83 months

[news] 
Tuesday 3rd June 2008 quote quote all
Yes, you are reading it correct it happens in most large sales offices, be it recruitment/property/advertising there is big cash there

monoloco

49 posts

77 months

[news] 
Monday 9th June 2008 quote quote all
I've been doing this recruitment malarky for 16 years and most of the above is true. I don't know much about the 'high street' market (ie churning out cannon-fodder like secretarial/admin, industrial temps, drivers etc) but in IT or similar you could expect a basic ranging from £18k to about £40k, plus all your commission which could be zip-all (in which case you'll either get sacked for being cr*p or give up 'cos the job ain't worth it unless you earn decent dosh. On the other hand you could hit hte mother-load with some good clients/good candidates and pull a six figure income. Be warned though -it's a tough job banghead and the staff turnover is huge (I've sacked five consultants in the past two years shoot)

Ultimately it depends on how good you are and above all hard you want to work. In my youth I worked my t*ts off 60-80 hours per week eek and used to crack £100k personal income most years. Best year I was on track to earn £250k smokin then along came 9/11 and the market crashed as hard as the twin towers and I earned sod all in the rest of the year. Since then I've taken it a whole lot more easily, do a sensible 40hour week and just work as hard as I need to earn as much as I need to.

theboymoon

2,695 posts

145 months

[news] 
Monday 9th June 2008 quote quote all
monoloco said:
and the staff turnover is huge
Do you mind if i ask, why do you think there is such a big turnover of staff?

What makes folk crack?

okgo

23,147 posts

83 months

[news] 
Monday 9th June 2008 quote quote all
Salesmen are often greedy so the allure to get more elsewhere is always there.

There is lots of reasons why the sales jobs dont stay filled by the same person long..

Long hours, hammering phones,staff favouritism,cut throat targets ect.

KimmyM

177 posts

77 months

[news] 
Monday 9th June 2008 quote quote all
Depends what industry and how good the company is as to how much you'll earn but you'll be on good wages if your good at your job, just remember the tax man will also love you.
Company I work for do a basic wage on how much experience you have in Sales.. + commission %
Or if your a resourcer with no experience and just a degree is basic and commission with a £100 + a placement dependant on the value.

If you want me to explain in detail let me know.

Jakestar

354 posts

76 months

[news] 
Tuesday 10th June 2008 quote quote all
This thread is very relevant to me aswell, since I have just finished university, have no experience in sales but am considering recruitment as a career, going in as a graduate.

KimmyM said:
Depends what industry and how good the company is as to how much you'll earn but you'll be on good wages if your good at your job, just remember the tax man will also love you.
Company I work for do a basic wage on how much experience you have in Sales.. + commission %
Or if your a resourcer with no experience and just a degree is basic and commission with a £100 + a placement dependant on the value.

If you want me to explain in detail let me know.
Yes please! smile Since I will have no experience but a 1st or 2.1 degree would like to know what to expect!

okgo

23,147 posts

83 months

[news] 
Tuesday 10th June 2008 quote quote all
I would have thought a degree and going into recruitment makes no difference to someone without a degree really..

All the sales roles I have done so far require something that cannot be taught at uni. And most students actually couldnt hack the hours ass they were used to doing FA from what I saw..

Jakestar

354 posts

76 months

[news] 
Tuesday 10th June 2008 quote quote all
okgo said:
I would have thought a degree and going into recruitment makes no difference to someone without a degree really..

All the sales roles I have done so far require something that cannot be taught at uni. And most students actually couldnt hack the hours ass they were used to doing FA from what I saw..
Would a person with a degree going into a 'graduate' job not start on a better wage/level etc than someone without?

The jobs ive been looking at have been only for those with degrees (graduate job sites) so i'm assuing there has to be some form of perk in securing a 'graduate' job in this sector than a 'standard' job?

However im obviously no expert..

Agreed re the skill of selling and yes us students are used to shorter hours laugh but when ure motviate by the prospect of earning alot of money it wont be a problem doing long hours!

Of course there are arguments in favour of having a degree smile

Edited by Jakestar on Tuesday 10th June 01:29

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