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Isaac Hunt

Original Poster:

7,145 posts

94 months

[news] 
Friday 9th January 2009 quote quote all
Well I know that it doesn't freeze but goes to gel.

I believe there is an additive to stop it doing this - do the petrol companies automatically add it during winter months?

And could petrol freeze - if so, at what temperature?

feef

838 posts

66 months

[news] 
Friday 9th January 2009 quote quote all
'waxing' of diesel isn't really an issue any more. It was in the 70's and 80's but modern diesels don't have the problem.

Unless you're talking about Scandinavian temperatures of -30 and the like it's not something I'd worry about.

a

MrMoonyMan

1,998 posts

94 months

[news] 
Friday 9th January 2009 quote quote all

pugwash4x4

5,839 posts

104 months

[news] 
Friday 9th January 2009 quote quote all
as you suspect petroleum refiners temper diesel to seasonal variations- with summer diesel it usually freezes not far below zero. Winter diesel in the uk can usually do -12 without any probs iirc. In sub arctic regions "diesel" will run down to -35/-40. I say diesel in inverted comas because its generally half avgas or naptha by that point.

if you are worried about it you can add .5l of petrol to your tank- it won't do any harm but will stop the diesel waxing.

if you want more info then googl "cloud point of diesel" of CFPP of diesel

R3v 1

623 posts

66 months

[news] 
Friday 9th January 2009 quote quote all
I have been told (Though not 100% sure how accurate this maybe as it is Red Diesel that is used for running a boat before anyone asks!) That there is Summer and Winter Diesel. Winter diesel can freeze at anything below -15c and Summer diesel can freeze at anything below 0c.


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robinhood21

17,538 posts

115 months

[news] 
Friday 9th January 2009 quote quote all
If a diesel vehicle has trouble starting in cold conditions; it's more likely to be from water in the fuel-filter freezing than the diesel.
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