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biggest+smallest litre/cylinder

biggest+smallest litre/cylinder

Author
Discussion

samdale

Original Poster:

2,165 posts

90 months

Thursday 23rd April 2009
quotequote all
just curious really. seen quite a few old cars which seem to have comparitively small engines considering the amount of cylinders.

e.g. 1934 MG KN saloon available as a 1086cc inline 6

working out as 1.086/6 = 0.181 ltrs/cyl

just wondering what production cars had the biggest and smallest ltrs/cyl past and present.

jimmy306

2,856 posts

93 months

Thursday 23rd April 2009
quotequote all
Smallest prodcution V6 was on the Mazda MX3, with a 1.8 V6.

James

ZesPak

16,531 posts

102 months

Thursday 23rd April 2009
quotequote all
I'll drop in the LS7, 7 litres in 8cyl: 0,875l/cyl
Used in Z06 and HSV W427

Sure there must be with more, but it's a start smile.

curlie467

6,177 posts

107 months

Thursday 23rd April 2009
quotequote all
Flat-twin
Smallest flat-twin engine (gasoline) - 0.38 L (375 cc/23 in³) - 1948 Citroen 2CV
Largest flat-twin engine (gasoline) - 0.65 L (652 cc/40 in³) - 1978 Citroen Visa
Straight-3 (I3)
Smallest I3 engine (gasoline) - 0.36 L (357 cc/22 in³) - 1967 Suzuki Fronte
Smallest I3 engine (Diesel) - 0.8 L (799 cc/48.8 in³) - 2000 Smart Fortwo cdi
Largest I3 engine (gasoline) - 1.2 L (1198 cc/73 in³) - 2002 Volkswagen Polo/SEAT Ibiza/Å*koda Fabia
Largest I3 engine (Diesel) - 1.8 L (1779 cc/109 in³) - 1984 Alfa Romeo 33 1.8 TD
Straight-4 (I4)
Smallest I4 engine (gasoline) - 0.36 L (356 cc/21.7 in³) - 1963 Honda T360 AS250E
Smallest I4 engine (Diesel) - 1.25 L (1248 cc/65 in³) - 2003 Fiat Nuova Panda MultiJet
Largest I4 engine (gasoline) - 3.2 L (3188 cc/194.5 in³) - 1961 Pontiac Tempest 195
Largest I4 engine (Diesel) - 3.2 L (3200 cc/195 in³) - Mitsubishi Pajero 4M41
V4 engine
Smallest V4 engine - 0.9 L (903 cc/55 in³) - 1939 Lancia Ardea V4
Largest V4 engine - 2.6 L (2568 cc/157 in³) - 1930 Lancia Lambda V4
Straight-5 (I5)
Smallest I5 engine (gasoline) - 1.9 L (1921 cc/117 in³) - 1981 Audi 100 1.9 E
Smallest I5 engine (Diesel) - 2.0 L (1986 cc/121 in³) - 1978 Audi 100 2.0 D
Largest I5 engine (gasoline) - 3.7 L (3653 cc/223 in³) - 2007 GM Atlas L5R 3700
Largest I5 engine (Diesel) - 3.5 L (3469 cc/212 in³) - 1990 Land Cruiser 1PZ Diesel
Straight-6 (I6)
Smallest I6 engine (gasoline) - 1.0 L (1047 cc/64 in³) - 1978 Honda CBX1000
Smallest I6 engine (Diesel) - 2.4 L (2383 cc/145 in³) - 1979 Volvo 240 D24
Largest I6 engine (gasoline) - 5.0 L (5047 cc/308 in³) - c 1953 Hudson Hornet
Largest I6 engine (Diesel) - 6.7 L (6690 cc/408 in³) - 2007 Dodge Ram 2500/3500 Cummins B series turbodiesel
V6 engine
Smallest V6 engine (gasoline) - 1.0 L - 1960s DKW F102 (a two-stroke V6) (about 100 produced for testing, 13 fitted to road cars)[1]
Honorable mention: 1.6 L (1597 cc/97 in³) - 1992 Mitsubishi Lancer 6A10
Smallest V6 engine (Diesel) - 2.5 L (2496 cc/152 in³) - 1996 Audi/VW 2.5 TDI (in multiple cars)
Largest V6 engine (gasoline) - 5.8 L (5755 cc/351 in³) - 1966 GMC 1000-3500 series 351E 60° V6
Largest V6 engine (Diesel) - 4.3 L (4304 cc/262 in³) - 1982 GM LT6
V8 engine
Smallest V8 engine (gasoline) - 2.0 L (1990 cc/121 in³) - 1975 Ferrari 208 GT4
Others: ATS/BRM/Coventry Climax and Ferrari Formula One 1.5 L V8 engines (none of them used in a road car)
Smallest American V8 engine - 3.4 L (3391 cc/207 in³) - 1996 Ford Taurus SHO V8
Smallest V8 engine (Diesel) - 3.3 L (3328 cc/203 in³) - 2000 Audi A8 3.3 TDI
Largest V8 engine (gasoline) - 8.2 L (8194 cc/500 in³) - 1970 Cadillac Eldorado 500
Honorable mention: 12.8 L (12782 cc/780 in³) - 2006 Weineck Cobra 780 (limited edition tuner car)
Largest small-block V8 engine - 7.0 L (7008 cc/428 in³) - 2006 Chevrolet Corvette Z06
Largest V8 engine (Diesel) - 7.3 L (7275 cc/444 in³) - 1997 Ford F250 Power Stroke
V10 engine
Smallest V10 engine - 4.9 L (4921 cc/301 in³) - Volkswagen Touareg V10 TDI
Largest V10 engine - 8.3 L (8277 cc/505 in³) - 2003 Dodge Viper
V12 engine
Smallest V12 engine - 2.0 L (1995 cc/122 in³) - 1948 Ferrari 166 Inter Colombo
Largest V12 engine - 7.5 L (7467c cc/456 in³)- 1934 Packard Twelve Victoria
Honorable mention: - 7.7 L (7730 cc/471 in³) -TVR Cerbera Speed 12 (Vehicle never reached production).
Largest W12 engine - 6.0 L (6000 cc/366 cu in³) 2005 Audi A8
V16 engine
Largest V16 engine - 7.4 L (7406 cc/452 in³)- 1930 Cadillac V16
Honorable mention: 13.6 L (13600 cc/829 cu in³) 2003 Cadillac Sixteen (concept car)
W16 engine
Largest W16 engine - 8.0 L (7993 cc) - 2005 Bugatti Veyron 16.4

LeoZwalf

2,568 posts

136 months

Thursday 23rd April 2009
quotequote all
Ferrari 250 GT = 2.5 litres, V12. 208cc/cyl. Awesome sounding thing and I was lucky enough to drive one once!



Some very old stuff had rather large capacity in a low number of cylinders, I may be rather wrong but weren't there some 6+ litre 4 cylinder cars waaay back in the 1910-1920's?
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samdale

Original Poster:

2,165 posts

90 months

Thursday 23rd April 2009
quotequote all
jimmy306 said:
Smallest prodcution V6 was on the Mazda MX3, with a 1.8 V6.

James
not particularly worried about engine configurations and sizes "smallest production V6/V8" etc as i believe it's been covered. just pondering the ltr/cyl

for EXAMPLE the largest V8 might be 8 litres = 1ltr/cyl but could be beaten by say an 8ltr V6 or 12ltr V10 when it comes to ltr/cyl

Nobody You Know

8,422 posts

99 months

Thursday 23rd April 2009
quotequote all
RE above. I'm pretty sure the largest I4 Diesel is not 3.2L my Fathers Merc Van had a 4L I4 apparently (it was an 814D if that helps)

LeoZwalf

2,568 posts

136 months

Thursday 23rd April 2009
quotequote all
What about truck engines? Or boat? Some of those are crazy huge especially boats.

I notice in the pasted post above that the Alfa Romeo 33 1.8 TD is a 3 cylinder? Is that correct?! Seems like a very large capacity for 3 pots.

ZesPak

16,531 posts

102 months

Thursday 23rd April 2009
quotequote all
LeoZwalf said:
What about truck engines? Or boat? Some of those are crazy huge especially boats.

I notice in the pasted post above that the Alfa Romeo 33 1.8 TD is a 3 cylinder? Is that correct?! Seems like a very large capacity for 3 pots.
But still no contender at 0,6l/cyl

crofty1984

11,523 posts

110 months

Thursday 23rd April 2009
quotequote all
Ferrari 208 has a 2 litre V8 (Italian market) that's the smallest production V8 i think
At uni there was a 7 litre single cylinder engine.

Eddh

4,482 posts

98 months

Thursday 23rd April 2009
quotequote all
Smallist - 50cc moped.

samdale

Original Poster:

2,165 posts

90 months

Thursday 23rd April 2009
quotequote all
crofty1984 said:
Ferrari 208 has a 2 litre V8 (Italian market) that's the smallest production V8 i thinkreadit
At uni there was a 7 litre single cylinder engine.
was this^^ in a "production car"???

crofty1984

11,523 posts

110 months

Thursday 23rd April 2009
quotequote all
samdale said:
crofty1984 said:
Ferrari 208 has a 2 litre V8 (Italian market) that's the smallest production V8 i thinkreadit
At uni there was a 7 litre single cylinder engine.
was this^^ in a "production car"???
The Ferrari, yes it was. The diesel probably not. The flywheel was 12feet in diameter.

samdale

Original Poster:

2,165 posts

90 months

Thursday 23rd April 2009
quotequote all
ZesPak and LeoZwalf maybe one of you could somehow reword my OP. i know im not the most ingenius writer but i really didn't think it was THAT hard to understand...

IIRC "largest production this..." and "smallest production that..." was covered a while back

mrmr96

13,736 posts

110 months

Thursday 23rd April 2009
quotequote all
Someone asked a related question last year:
http://pistonheads.co.uk/xforums/topic.asp?h=0&amp...

I also put this table together which demonstrates that there appears to be an optimal capacity per cylinder.

Car Size litres Configuration cc per cylinder
Matiz 0.8 in line 3 267
Corsa 1.0 in line 3 333
Corsa 1.2 in line 4 300
Focus 1.4 in line 4 350
Focus 1.8 in line 4 450
Focus 2 in line 4 500
Evo 2 in line 4 500
Focus 2.5 in line 5 500
R34 2.6 in line 6 433
630i 3 in line 6 500
350Z 3.5 v6 583
M3 4 v8 500
M5 5 v10 500
Enzo 6 v12 500
Veyron 8 w16 500

Gizmo!

18,150 posts

115 months

Thursday 23rd April 2009
quotequote all
In 1964-65, the Ferrari 1512 was a 1.5 litre 180deg V12. 125cc per cylinder is pretty teeny.
http://www.ultimatecarpage.com/car/139/Ferrari-151...

ZesPak

16,531 posts

102 months

Thursday 23rd April 2009
quotequote all
samdale said:
ZesPak and LeoZwalf maybe one of you could somehow reword my OP. i know im not the most ingenius writer but i really didn't think it was THAT hard to understand...

IIRC "largest production this..." and "smallest production that..." was covered a while back
Thanks, lets start all over.
We want 4 engines:

Fewest l/cyl ever in production car (samdale: 0,181)
Fewest l/cyl currently in production car

Most l/cyl ever in production car
Most l/cyl currently in production car (ZesPak: 0,875)

jon-

14,614 posts

122 months

Thursday 23rd April 2009
quotequote all
Nice table above!

I'm sure I read somewhere that with modern engine tech much about 2.5 litres in a 4 cylinder engine is pointless. It's more efficient to switch to a 6 cylinder engine.

I can't think of many 2.5 litre 4 cylinder petrols anymore (Mazda 6 springs to mind) and none larger still in production.

fluffnik

19,961 posts

133 months

Thursday 23rd April 2009
quotequote all
LeoZwalf said:
Ferrari 250 GT = 2.5 litres, V12. 208cc/cyl. Awesome sounding thing and I was lucky enough to drive one once!
nono

Ferrari numbering of that period was based on single cylinder capacity in cc:
  • 166 - 12x166cc = 2l
  • 250 - 12x250cc = 3l
  • 275 - 12x275cc = 3.3l
  • 500 - 4x500cc = 2l
  • ...

LeoZwalf

2,568 posts

136 months

Thursday 23rd April 2009
quotequote all
fluffnik said:
LeoZwalf said:
Ferrari 250 GT = 2.5 litres, V12. 208cc/cyl. Awesome sounding thing and I was lucky enough to drive one once!
nono

Ferrari numbering of that period was based on single cylinder capacity in cc:
  • 166 - 12x166cc = 2l
  • 250 - 12x250cc = 3l
  • 275 - 12x275cc = 3.3l
  • 500 - 4x500cc = 2l
  • ...
Thanks - I had always been told it was a 2.5 litre so was going on that info smile