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quyen

Original Poster:

592 posts

78 months

[news] 
Wednesday 22nd July 2009 quote quote all
With the number of pubs going up for sales at the moment, has anyone had any experience of buying a pub and converting it into a homebeer? The advantages are obvious - huge rooms, garden and parking spacestank! But how difficult is it to get planning permission to change a pub into a home and what about the VAT you have to pay for a pubconfused?

Edited by quyen on Wednesday 22 July 10:48

Davel

7,577 posts

142 months

[news] 
Wednesday 22nd July 2009 quote quote all
It might be worth talking to your local planning dept if you find one suitable. If it was a house at some stage previous, then a change of use should be easier.

As for VAT, the price will be inclusive of VAT so negotiate downwards accordingly.

mk1fan

4,573 posts

109 months

[news] 
Wednesday 22nd July 2009 quote quote all
Great idea - as you say loads of space but the place will stink. Years of booze, spillages (booze and human) and probable poor maintenance so a full strip out would be needed. Even then the smell may never go away.

spikeyhead

8,679 posts

81 months

[news] 
Wednesday 22nd July 2009 quote quote all
It's usually only worthn doing when there's room in the carpark and garden to build a few extra houses.

109 Bob

3,762 posts

102 months

[news] 
Wednesday 22nd July 2009 quote quote all
I suppose it depends a lot on if you're buying the pub as a trading business & property or just the property. If just the property then there are some real bargains to be had at the moment.
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wolf1

2,619 posts

134 months

[news] 
Wednesday 22nd July 2009 quote quote all
spikeyhead said:
It's usually only worthn doing when there's room in the carpark and garden to build a few extra houses.
Why's that? The last thing I would want is to build houses close to mine when I can have the extra land/space. I've been looking at quite a few pubs myself to buy and convert into a more interesting/spacious home for myself.

quyen

Original Poster:

592 posts

78 months

[news] 
Thursday 23rd July 2009 quote quote all
109 Bob said:
I suppose it depends a lot on if you're buying the pub as a trading business & property or just the property. If just the property then there are some real bargains to be had at the moment.
I know nothing about running a pub so it will have to be converted into a nice homebeer.

Can you buy the pub, keep it close and live upstairs (which is already residential) whilst using the downstairs unofficiallycool as a living room (i.e when you're still waiting for planning permission to come throughjudge)? Is there any costs associated with keeping the pub close e.g. business ratefrown?

mk1fan

4,573 posts

109 months

[news] 
Thursday 23rd July 2009 quote quote all
There are lots of empty ex-pubs that don't have licenses which are - effectively - worthless. They're the bargains.

A going concern will be more expensive and I expect you'll receive objections from the public at the planning application stage.

scotal

8,750 posts

163 months

[news] 
Thursday 23rd July 2009 quote quote all
quyen said:
109 Bob said:
I suppose it depends a lot on if you're buying the pub as a trading business & property or just the property. If just the property then there are some real bargains to be had at the moment.
I know nothing about running a pub so it will have to be converted into a nice homebeer.

Can you buy the pub, keep it close and live upstairs (which is already residential) whilst using the downstairs unofficiallycool as a living room (i.e when you're still waiting for planning permission to come throughjudge)? Is there any costs associated with keeping the pub close e.g. business ratefrown?
You'd have to get a pretty specialised mortgage on it for a start.

Shelsleyf2

229 posts

116 months

[news] 
Thursday 23rd July 2009 quote quote all
Be aware that in changing use you will have to comply with the latest regulations re Insulation and also noise, you could find yourself having to secondary glaze to comply with noise levels and major works in order to attain insulation levels.

Scraggles

7,619 posts

108 months

[news] 
Thursday 23rd July 2009 quote quote all
local pub got closed, landlord moved out - strained arm moving the kit

then the windows get punched in with bricks and the new owners want him back in to guard it, no work on the grounds apart from a pile of junk the pikeys have left there....

109 Bob

3,762 posts

102 months

[news] 
Thursday 23rd July 2009 quote quote all
mk1fan said:
There are lots of empty ex-pubs that don't have licenses which are - effectively - worthless. They're the bargains.

A going concern will be more expensive and I expect you'll receive objections from the public at the planning application stage.
That is exactly what I was trying to say. smile

If it's a closed pub the equipment, pumps coolers etc. will probably of been removed. You'll only be buying a property with no business attached, rather than buying a property & a business.

On another note, something I would be careful of is that a lot of pubs are obviously old & some may have been built pacifically as a pub. So if the building is listed, grade 2 for example, you may run into planning problems changing it into a residence from a pub. I am not an expert & am just suggesting that you really need to talk to someone that is. smile

staceyb

7,091 posts

108 months

[news] 
Thursday 23rd July 2009 quote quote all
http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/prope...

This is at the end of our street, I soooooooo want to buy it and convert it.

King Herald

19,530 posts

100 months

[news] 
Thursday 23rd July 2009 quote quote all
mk1fan said:
Great idea - as you say loads of space but the place will stink. Years of booze, spillages (booze and human) and probable poor maintenance so a full strip out would be needed. Even then the smell may never go away.
When I lived in a run down rental house I blagged a free carpet from my local, during a winter renovation.

I fitted it to my large bedroom, looked very nice, faint smeel of beer, no prblems.

But when the summer came round and it all warmed up the smell of fag smoke, stale beer, puke, blood, sweaty feet etc, became nauseating. I scrubbed and powdered that carpet several times before the vile odour faded.

Simpo Two

59,536 posts

149 months

[news] 
Thursday 23rd July 2009 quote quote all
King Herald said:
When I lived in a run down rental house I blagged a free carpet from my local, during a winter renovation. I fitted it to my large bedroom, looked very nice, faint smeel of beer, no prblems.

But when the summer came round and it all warmed up the smell of fag smoke, stale beer, puke, blood, sweaty feet etc, became nauseating. I scrubbed and powdered that carpet several times before the vile odour faded.
hurl I'd rather have had bare floorboards!

Alfa_75_Steve

7,489 posts

84 months

[news] 
Thursday 23rd July 2009 quote quote all
109 Bob said:
On another note, something I would be careful of is that a lot of pubs are obviously old & some may have been built pacifically as a pub.
He'll just have to ride the waves of this one and see what the tide brings in.

jeff m

3,866 posts

142 months

[news] 
Saturday 25th July 2009 quote quote all
My Brother has a an ex pub, it was already a residence when he bought it.
He has since extended it twice without too much planning objection.

With regard to them being built differently, some of the widow ledges are 18" which would indicate slightly thicker walls than the average house.smile


sleep envy

61,820 posts

133 months

[news] 
Monday 27th July 2009 quote quote all
if you do buy one have a look at the existing fittings - ou could make a few quid selling them to architectural salvage places

Lefty Guns

13,558 posts

86 months

wolf1

2,619 posts

134 months

[news] 
Tuesday 28th July 2009 quote quote all
Lefty Guns said:
If it was my pub and I was in the mood to be a stubborn git then I wouldn't sell it and just continue to use the accommodation part to live in. Where would the locals be with their essential job creator for the community be then? I'm sure a few years down the road the council would have a rethink as it would never be a pub again.
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