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Buffalo

Original Poster:

5,027 posts

139 months

[news] 
Friday 9th January 2004 quote quote all
kN/m2..?

Having mental block

Is it multiply by 50..?

Ta

chaparral

965 posts

144 months

[news] 
Friday 9th January 2004 quote quote all
9.81 N=1 kg mass under gravity on earth's surface.
10000 cm2=1 m2.

Therefore, it's around 1050 kg/cm2=1 N/m2.

chrisjl

781 posts

167 months

[news] 
Friday 9th January 2004 quote quote all
chaparral said:
9.81 N=1 kg mass under gravity on earth's surface.
10000 cm2=1 m2.

Therefore, it's around 1050 kg/cm2=1 N/m2.


Err, hasn't that gone horribly wrong somewhere?
1 tonne per square centimeter does not equal 1 Newton per square meter

AndyS2

778 posts

143 months

[news] 
Friday 9th January 2004 quote quote all
This is always useful to have on your desk-top:-

www.katmarsoftware.com/?referrer=Uconeer17A

Down load the Uconeer conversion software for engineers, its free and really useful.

Andy

chrisjl

781 posts

167 months

[news] 
Friday 9th January 2004 quote quote all
1kg/cm2 = 10,000kg/m2 = 1,020N/m2 = 1.02kN/m2

(maybe, it's been a long hard day...)
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joust

14,606 posts

144 months

[news] 
Friday 9th January 2004 quote quote all
You can do it in google

"1 kilogram per centimeter squared / 1 Newton per meter squared" in google gives

10 000 s2 / m

i.e. you are of course talking about two different things and therefore have SI units left over....

A Newton is m * kg * s-2.

J

Buffalo

Original Poster:

5,027 posts

139 months

[news] 
Friday 9th January 2004 quote quote all
chrisjl said:
1kg/cm2 = 10,000kg/m2 = 1,020N/m2 = 1.02kN/m2

(maybe, it's been a long hard day...)


That was the figure (roughly) that i made it out to be, but then someone came and ballsed my head up with this x50 nonsense... I pout in his general direction!

humph

jim'schim

502 posts

137 months

[news] 
Friday 9th January 2004 quote quote all
Buffalo said:
kN/m2..?

Having mental block

Is it multiply by 50..?

Ta


You might try this page. Don't know if the conversion table is any use to you, but it's handy www.ex.ac.uk/trol/dictunit/dictunit1.htm

joust

14,606 posts

144 months

[news] 
Friday 9th January 2004 quote quote all
chaparral said:
9.81 N=1 kg mass under gravity on earth's surface.
10000 cm2=1 m2.
Therefore, it's around 1050 kg/cm2=1 N/m2.


Err - not the SI unit of a Newton isn't!

The 9.8 would only be if you were talking about a mass that was accelerating in a true vertical fashion, if you are talking about force perpindicular to gravity then gravity doesn't have anything to do with it....

See above...

J

>> Edited by joust on Friday 9th January 17:19

Buffalo

Original Poster:

5,027 posts

139 months

[news] 
Friday 9th January 2004 quote quote all
[quote=www.ex.ac.uk/cimt/dictunit/dictunit.htm#pressure[/quote]

1 kg-force/sq.centimetre x 98 066.5 = answer in pascals (N/m2)

That'll do i think...!



joust

14,606 posts

144 months

[news] 
Friday 9th January 2004 quote quote all
Buffalo said:

1 kg-force/sq.centimetre x 98 066.5 = answer in pascals (N/m2)
That'll do i think...!



Well done that man! Of course if you type "1 Newton per meter squared" into google it tells you
1 (Newton per (meter squared)) = 1 Pascal


And hence if you then want to convert that back in Earth's reference then the 9.80665 gets into play.

Anyone get a feeling this could turn into another "big bang" thread!

J

>> Edited by joust on Friday 9th January 17:20

Buffalo

Original Poster:

5,027 posts

139 months

[news] 
Friday 9th January 2004 quote quote all
joust said:

Well done that man!



It didn't help that i started the day off pissed...

Ta chap!

Oh i did get the Pa to kPa thing, thankfully i am not that far gone (yet)... Off to the pub - been a long day! Suggest you all do the same!

>> Edited by Buffalo on Friday 9th January 17:22

Incorrigible

13,653 posts

146 months

[news] 
Friday 9th January 2004 quote quote all
Pedantic git

Of course you can't compare mass with force

Unless you live somewhere with gravity

You know he meant Kilogram force

But I like your stlye

chaparral

965 posts

144 months

[news] 
Friday 9th January 2004 quote quote all
I didn't see the k in front of the N. Just divide my answer by 1000 to get it in kN/m2.

A kilogram is a unit of mass. A Newton is a unit of force. A force of one Newton will accelerate one kilogram at the rate of one meter per second per second.

While it is in close proximity to the surface of the earth, gravity will exert a FORCE of 9.81 Newtons, directed straight down, on any and every 1-kg object. If there is no other force on the object, this force will cause the object to accelerate at the rate of 9.81 m/s/s. However, if you place the object on a level table, the table will exert a reaction force that is equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to said gravitationally exerted force - the force due to gravity doesn't go away, it's just opposed by an equal reaction force giving a net force of zero.

Bodo

9,448 posts

151 months

[news] 
Friday 9th January 2004 quote quote all
chaparral said:
9.81 m/s/s
[smartarse-mode]9.81 m/s [/smartarse-mode]

chaparral

965 posts

144 months

[news] 
Friday 9th January 2004 quote quote all
Bodo, these are equivalent expressions. m/s^2 is just shorthand for meters per second per second.

minghis

1,341 posts

136 months

[news] 
Friday 9th January 2004 quote quote all
Just to confuse myself, I sometimes look at this excellent site which may well help you:

www.csgnetwork.com/converters.html

joust

14,606 posts

144 months

[news] 
Saturday 10th January 2004 quote quote all
Incorrigible said:
Pedantic git
Who moi???

roop

5,993 posts

169 months

[news] 
Saturday 10th January 2004 quote quote all
www.onlineconversion.com

Excellent site and converts most things. Always in my favourites list.

Roop

dbrennan

2 posts

60 months

[news] 
Monday 21st September 2009 quote quote all
Thanks, I have this cloud following today, I wish i could just restart the day from the begining.
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