Login | Register
SearchMy Stuff
My ProfileMy PreferencesMy Mates RSS Feed
Reply to Topic
Author Discussion

retroptvr

Original Poster:

334 posts

105 months

[news] 
Friday 20th November 2009 quote quote all
Just for starters, tell us what colour yours is.

Any advantage with red over blue, anyone still have green?

The big one, has anyone mixed them to bad effect?

Retrop

Edited by retroptvr on Friday 20th November 21:53

scotty_d

6,600 posts

80 months

[news] 
Friday 20th November 2009 quote quote all
I used a red one it is 5 year but i will change it every 12k, it was a better quality than the really cheap blue so just put it in and has proved fine when i did Europe this summer bought it at a local paint shop.

Motik

92 posts

62 months

[news] 
Friday 20th November 2009 quote quote all
Aren't they all the same stuff, with different dyes ?

Simon Says

11,463 posts

107 months

[news] 
Friday 20th November 2009 quote quote all
Motik said:
Aren't they all the same stuff, with different dyes ?
No wink i use a 5 year pink/red i get a very good price from Vauxhall,i mix up 45/55 with distilled water but that's just me rolleyes usage in a radiator where the water/coolant will cool an internal combustion engine is it better to use deionized or distilled water smile



Edited by Simon Says on Friday 20th November 20:49

bigdods

6,217 posts

113 months

[news] 
Friday 20th November 2009 quote quote all
colour can be a bit misleading...

I used to have green in the tiv. But now have orange. Which can also look pink. Apparently its the same as green and fully compatible just a different colour dye. This is changed every 2 years or as required by other work (like a new rad recently) by the specialist I use.

Blue is apparently similar to green and can be mixed with green. But I wouldnt want to experiment TBH as opinion varies and it may not mix that well. Red is a whole different mixture and if you mix with blue, green or orange you will get sludge and knacker your cooling system.

The old style blue, green and orange have a life of ~2 years. Red can last up to 5.

There is also purple..... no idea what that does.

Bottom line - forget the colour. Buy from one source only and use the same to top up.

So I have 3 bottles, one red from VW for the Golf, One red from Vauxhall for the Omega and one orange for the TVR.

50/50 mix regardless of type.

Advertisement

retroptvr

Original Poster:

334 posts

105 months

[news] 
Friday 20th November 2009 quote quote all
Motik said:
Aren't they all the same stuff, with different dyes ?
That's what I originally thought hence this posting, but have been doing some research in light of installing a new aluminium rad and this is what I have learn't: they don't mix:

Most antifreeze and coolant products on the market are ethylene glycol based with additives to prevent corrosion, lubricate seals and water pumps and aid in heat transfer to the coolant from the metal of the engine. Antifreeze coolant should typically be mixed with water at the ratio of one part antifreeze to one part water. This gives antifreeze protection down to minus 34 degrees and overheating / boil over protection up to 265 degrees. Do not use pure antifreeze in a cooling system without using at least 30 percent water in the mixture.

Most antifreeze coolant sold in recent years has been the traditional green coolant which has a life span of two to three years or up to 30,000 miles. Green antifreeze contains silicates, phosphates and borates as corrosion inhibitors to keep the solution alkaline. As long as the solution remains alkaline, corrosion is controlled and the cooling system is protected. Over time corrosion inhibitors are depleted and the corrosion protection is lost, therefore green antifreeze should be changed every two years.

Aluminium is especially vulnerable to corrosion and many vehicles have heads, radiators and other aluminium components in the cooling system. If the coolant in an engine cooling system is changed before corrosion inhibitors reach dangerously low levels, corrosion damage is prevented.

Long Life Antifreeze

An alternative to tradition green antifreeze is a product currently used by many vehicle manufacturers. Orange or Red antifreeze known as long life or extended life antifreeze increases the useful life of engine coolant. Long life antifreeze is also ethylene glycol based.

The difference between the two colours is that Orange / Red antifreeze contains a different type of corrosion inhibitor that has a much longer life than silicates, phosphates and borates. Orange / Red antifreeze contains organic acids that protect engine parts from corrosion.

Green antifreeze does not mix with long life antifreeze. Never mix the two colours in a cooling system. The organic acids in orange types will cause precipitation of silicates in the green type and corrosion protection is greatly reduced.

Orange type antifreezes are suitable for up to five years or 100,000 miles. They can also be used in many older vehicles if all of the green antifreeze is flushed from the system and is replaced with the orange / red antifreeze. The lifespan of long life antifreeze is about four years or 60,000 miles in older cars.

If you have doubts about switching from the green type of antifreeze to long life antifreeze, contact you retailer or car dealer and ask about compatibility with your cooling system. You can also contact Tetrosyl by email for further advice and technical support.

The level of protection of the coolant has little relevance to the corrosion protection. An antifreeze tester may show adequate frost protection but cannot test for corrosion protection which is depleted over time.

Change your coolant mix on a schedule based on the colour of the antifreeze you are using. Severe corrosion to engine and cooling system components can occur with resulting expensive repairs.

Source http://www.bluecol.co.uk/index.cfm?page=75



Edited by retroptvr on Friday 20th November 21:52

Halphast

1 posts

58 months

[news] 
Wednesday 23rd December 2009 quote quote all
The biggest difference in the two fluids is the chemical inhibitor additives. They are both Ethylene Glycol based fluids but use different additives for corrosion protection. Dexcool uses nitrite additives and that gives it it's orange color (Daimler-Chrysler vehicles use orange fluid but it is not dexcool). Regular antifreeze uses a phosphate based additive as well as silicates for aluminum corrosion protection. Dexcool uses no silicates but has still been shown to protect against aluminum corrosion. It is for this reason the two fluids should not be mixed. Dexcool has been shown to be more stable over a wider range of temperatures and will not break down over time like phosphate based antifreezes. It may also improve water pump life. One misconception I have run across is that dexcool is environmentally safer. This is absolutely false!! It is still ethylene glycol and is still hazardous!!

kenny.R400

833 posts

126 months

[news] 
Wednesday 23rd December 2009 quote quote all
I've just bought some pink for mine and was told it's fully synthetic and suitable for all cars after a flush out.

jim.2007

180 posts

76 months

[news] 
Friday 25th December 2009 quote quote all
mines looks like alluminous yellow, 13 quid for 5 litres, any one know the life span of this?

MADMAX2

2,287 posts

80 months

[news] 
Friday 25th December 2009 quote quote all
i use SHELL GLYCOL

£16 for 5 litres


best you can buy



biggrin

Bassfiend

4,674 posts

136 months

[news] 
Friday 25th December 2009 quote quote all
Should I have done more research than just picking up a 5 litre bottle of whatever blue stuff they had at Camberly Auto Factors the last time I was in?

hehe

Phil

retroptvr

Original Poster:

334 posts

105 months

[news] 
Saturday 26th December 2009 quote quote all
It seems in a nutshell, do not mix the colours unless you intend to flush and refill with one colour of your choice.

spend

12,470 posts

137 months

[news] 
Saturday 26th December 2009 quote quote all
retroptvr said:
It seems in a nutshell, do not mix the colours unless you intend to flush and refill with one colour of your choice.
Even the same colours can be totally different... If in doubt flush & refill with your weapon of choice wink Then stick to the type/brand that you have selected.

exitwound

376 posts

66 months

[news] 
Sunday 21st April 2013 quote quote all
For pre 1990 motors, only use Blue antifreeze which is IAT (inorganic)

De-ionised water isn't the same as distilled water. De-ionising is an unnatural state for water and it will only seek to re-ionise itself from any surface it comes in contact with. To you and I, that means accelerated corrosion within your engine no matter how good your antifreeze or corrosion inhibitor is.. Be advised!
Reply to Topic