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Mark34bn

Original Poster:

783 posts

62 months

[news] 
Friday 5th February 2010 quote quote all
We have a single block walled garage which I'm trying to smarten up, paint etc. It has a slightly angled corrugated asbestos roof which I've covered with corrugated plastic sheets to seal. The problem I'm having is there is condensation forming on the inside of the roof which runs back and down the back wall of the garage.
Could this be cured by fitting some air bricks to improve ventilation ? There are some gaps around the garage door and even with the side door left open overnight, the condensation still forms.
Please help it's driving me mad!

Wings

4,466 posts

100 months

[news] 
Friday 5th February 2010 quote quote all
The new building regs. for flat roofs calls for insulation in roof void. I have a top floor flat, with a flat roof terrace above ceiling, and getting a lot of condensation. By removing surface of roof/terrace, and filling the void between roof and flat's ceiling with loft insulation, i have stopped the condensation.

In your case the same might be achieved by a false ceiling with loft insulation.

King Herald

19,596 posts

101 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th February 2010 quote quote all
Mark34bn said:
We have a single block walled garage which I'm trying to smarten up, paint etc. It has a slightly angled corrugated asbestos roof which I've covered with corrugated plastic sheets to seal. The problem I'm having is there is condensation forming on the inside of the roof which runs back and down the back wall of the garage.
Could this be cured by fitting some air bricks to improve ventilation ? There are some gaps around the garage door and even with the side door left open overnight, the condensation still forms.
Please help it's driving me mad!
Condensation forms when warm damp air meets a cold hard surface. Putting the plastic sheet there is the perfect way to form condensation.

Even without any form of heating in the garage you will still get the condensation as the outside weather will change and the roof surface will change temperature at a different rate to the inside air. The same way you get dew on things early in the morning.

You would do better trying to line the roof with some form of soft sheet insulation, to present less of a sharp temperature change.

Mark34bn

Original Poster:

783 posts

62 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th February 2010 quote quote all
Originally I thought the roof was leaking, I'd go in in the morning and there would be water droplets covering the inside of the roof. Didn't want the hassle of trying to dispose of the asbestos roof so I covered the whole thing with corrugated plastic sheets to seal it.
I guessed some kind of false ceiling / insulation was called for and it was my plan to do this when I get time, and also batten the walls and get some gyproc sheets in there eventually.

pugwash4x4

5,878 posts

106 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th February 2010 quote quote all
couple of

http://www.frost.co.uk/item_Detail.asp?productID=9... Dry &catID=&frostCat=&frostSubCat=&subCatID=

should sort it- work well in my car anyway.
Advertisement

Henry-F

4,611 posts

130 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th February 2010 quote quote all
You aren't going to solve the problem with drying bags like that !

Were it me I'd solve the problem once and for all. Take the roof off and fit a kingspan roof (expanded foam trapped between 2 sheets of metal). Funnily enough there was a thread on here just the other day asking where to buy it cheaply kingspan thread

If the cement board sheet is taken off the old roof carefully it isn't the most expensive stuff in the world to get rid of, probably £2-400 and you'd only have someone moan when you came to sell the house potentially chipping you for more than that off the price.

Henry

Trevelyan

680 posts

74 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th February 2010 quote quote all
It could well be free to get rid of. We removed the asbestos roof from my brothers garage last year, and his local council tip had free disposal facilities, the only proviso being that you had to wrap it in plastic first. So the only cost was about £30 for a roll of plastic from the builders merchant, and the petrol too and from the tip.

King Herald

19,596 posts

101 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th February 2010 quote quote all
Henry-F said:
You aren't going to solve the problem with drying bags like that !

Were it me I'd solve the problem once and for all. Take the roof off and fit a kingspan roof (expanded foam trapped between 2 sheets of metal). Funnily enough there was a thread on here just the other day asking where to buy it cheaply kingspan thread

If the cement board sheet is taken off the old roof carefully it isn't the most expensive stuff in the world to get rid of, probably £2-400 and you'd only have someone moan when you came to sell the house potentially chipping you for more than that off the price.

Henry
I agree, the drying bags would be a waste of time.

The Kingspan roof may well give exactly the same condensation, as the inside surface is still hard metal and will be the same temperature as the outside of the garage.

Unless the garage is internally heated?


bimsb6

4,885 posts

106 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th February 2010 quote quote all
could you vent the garage to stop the condensation ?

Mark34bn

Original Poster:

783 posts

62 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th February 2010 quote quote all
I'll happily put some vents in if it means reduced condensation. There isn't any heating in there as the garage is the other side of the patio, I'd have extended the central heating system into there if I could!
I still had the problem despite leaving the side door open, but I guess that didn't count as through flow ventilation.

King Herald

19,596 posts

101 months

[news] 
Sunday 7th February 2010 quote quote all
Mark34bn said:
I'll happily put some vents in if it means reduced condensation. There isn't any heating in there as the garage is the other side of the patio, I'd have extended the central heating system into there if I could!
I still had the problem despite leaving the side door open, but I guess that didn't count as through flow ventilation.
Through ventilation you need, so the air inside can move around as freely as the air outside. I was thinking you'd be trying to keep it warm as well, but simply letting the whole place breathe easily will make a difference.
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