PistonHeads.com Forum

PCP Calculator

Author
Discussion

glenn911C4S

Original Poster:

257 posts

142 months

Friday 5th March 2010
quotequote all
Anyone know a good online PCP calculator that you can alter the loan amount, rate, deposit and period?

Manks

10,331 posts

130 months

Saturday 6th March 2010
quotequote all


No, and be careful there is one on the Internet that doesn't add in the double interest on the balloon payment.

The only other ones I have seen want you to choose a model and give them your details so they can contact you.

If you don't find what you want email me. Having just gone through working all this out I can probably give you a formula. Though that is not as easy as using an online calculator obviously.

Manks

Dr Jekyll

10,585 posts

169 months

Sunday 7th March 2010
quotequote all
Manks said:
No, and be careful there is one on the Internet that doesn't add in the double interest on the balloon payment.
rofl

johnfm

12,693 posts

158 months

Sunday 7th March 2010
quotequote all
Careful Dr Jekyll

Manks will quote the FSA at you!

OP

Just build a spreadsheet

the only tricky bit is the APR calculation

You need to build a column of cash flows (ie -20000 for the 20000 car loan, then +ve amounts for each monthly payment and the balloon at the end).

Then apply the IRR function to the cashflows. Then use the IRR to calc APR.

Manks

10,331 posts

130 months

Sunday 7th March 2010
quotequote all
Dr Jekyll said:
Manks said:
No, and be careful there is one on the Internet that doesn't add in the double interest on the balloon payment.
rofl
So you don't think interest is paid on the balloon twice then no?

Manks
Advertisement

Dr Jekyll

10,585 posts

169 months

Sunday 7th March 2010
quotequote all
Manks said:
Dr Jekyll said:
Manks said:
No, and be careful there is one on the Internet that doesn't add in the double interest on the balloon payment.
rofl
So you don't think interest is paid on the balloon twice then no?

Manks
No.

If loan A means owing an average of £500 for 12 months (EG because £1000 is paid off in instalments), and loan B means owing an average of £1000 for the same period (EG because it's a one off balloon payment), then for the same interest rate I would expect to pay twice as much interest on loan B.

Not because interest is paid twice, but because I am effectively borrowing twice as much money.

If you insist on regarding the interest rate as half the true rate then you have to double it to get the right figure, but that is simply a demonstration that your figure was wrong in the first place.

Manks

10,331 posts

130 months

Sunday 7th March 2010
quotequote all
Dr Jekyll said:
Manks said:
Dr Jekyll said:
Manks said:
No, and be careful there is one on the Internet that doesn't add in the double interest on the balloon payment.
rofl
So you don't think interest is paid on the balloon twice then no?

Manks
No.

If loan A means owing an average of £500 for 12 months (EG because £1000 is paid off in instalments), and loan B means owing an average of £1000 for the same period (EG because it's a one off balloon payment), then for the same interest rate I would expect to pay twice as much interest on loan B.

Not because interest is paid twice, but because I am effectively borrowing twice as much money.
Perhaps I should be more explicit. When being offered a PCP deal you will, in all probability, be quoted a flat rate. This must be applied twice to the deferred or "balloon" payment. Once to the part of the loan that is being amortised.

Dr Jekyll said:
If you insist on regarding the interest rate as half the true rate then you have to double it to get the right figure, but that is simply a demonstration that your figure was wrong in the first place.
It is not a question of me "regarding" the interest rate as half the true rate. I am using the figure that will inevitably be quoted by the dealer in order to obtain the right answer.

Manks

Dr Jekyll

10,585 posts

169 months

Sunday 7th March 2010
quotequote all
Manks said:
It is not a question of me "regarding" the interest rate as half the true rate. I am using the figure that will inevitably be quoted by the dealer in order to obtain the right answer.

Manks
No, it will be quoted by the dealer to make the rate sound lower than it really is. The fact that you have to double it to get the right answer is a clue.

Manks

10,331 posts

130 months

Sunday 7th March 2010
quotequote all
Dr Jekyll said:
Manks said:
It is not a question of me "regarding" the interest rate as half the true rate. I am using the figure that will inevitably be quoted by the dealer in order to obtain the right answer.

Manks
No, it will be quoted by the dealer to make the rate sound lower than it really is. The fact that you have to double it to get the right answer is a clue.
Oh for sure. But the fact remains that you need to apply the flat rate once to the amortised part of the loan and twice to the deferred payment or bubble. Which is what I said originally.

Manks



Edited by Manks on Sunday 7th March 14:18

sidicks

12,879 posts

129 months

Sunday 7th March 2010
quotequote all
Manks said:
Oh for sure. But the fact remains that you need to apply the flat rate once to the amortised part of the loan and twice to the deferred payment or bubble. Which is what I said and which you apparently disagreed with.

Manks
It's the same point as we are discussing on the other thread - if you use the 'proper' IRR calculation then you don't need to charge the (wrong) interest rate twice to get the right answer!!
smile
Sidicks


Manks

10,331 posts

130 months

Sunday 7th March 2010
quotequote all
sidicks said:
Manks said:
Oh for sure. But the fact remains that you need to apply the flat rate once to the amortised part of the loan and twice to the deferred payment or bubble. Which is what I said and which you apparently disagreed with.

Manks
It's the same point as we are discussing on the other thread - if you use the 'proper' IRR calculation then you don't need to charge the (wrong) interest rate twice to get the right answer!!
smile
Sidicks
But if you do it your way, you get the WRONG answer as you have already demonstrated.

Manks

sidicks

12,879 posts

129 months

Sunday 7th March 2010
quotequote all
Manks said:
But if you do it your way, you get the WRONG answer as you have already demonstrated.

Manks
No you don't!!

Why do you think you get the wrong answer?
confused
Sidicks

Manks

10,331 posts

130 months

Sunday 7th March 2010
quotequote all
sidicks said:
Manks said:
But if you do it your way, you get the WRONG answer as you have already demonstrated.

Manks
No you don't!!

Why do you think you get the wrong answer?
confused
Sidicks
Because on page 1 of the other thread you assert:

sidicks said:
Ok, as has already been posted previously (hundreds of times), flat rate is meaningless, you need to use the APR to calculate the monthly payments, as this takes into account all fees etc.

With a £10k car and £1k deposit, there is £9k to finance. Effectively there are 2 parts to this agreement:
- A £5000 loan (residual) on which interest is paid but no capital
- A £4000 loan which is re-payable over 3 years

Using an APR of 8.8% (equivalent to a monthly rate of 0.71%):
The interest on the £5k loan is £35.27 per month
The interest and capital repayment on the £4k loan is £126.20

This leads to a total premium of £161.47
Whereas "RS6 see you", who is a car finance broker, inputted the figures into his PCP calculator and obtained the figure: £170.70 which also tallies with the answer calculating it manually.

So, your method has been demonstrated to give the incorrect answer.

But as I have said on the other thread I think it is time for me to draw a line under this. I have a car to wash and enjoy in the sunshine - and you know what it hasn't got any finance on it. wink

Manks


Edited by Manks on Sunday 7th March 14:31

johnfm

12,693 posts

158 months

Sunday 7th March 2010
quotequote all
The 'calculation' is very very easy to create on excel.

For the example figures, if you pay £1000 deposit on day one and £170.69 per month with a £5k balloon, the APR is 8.71%.

Amount of loan 10000
admin fees 0
deposit 1000
monthly pmt 170.69
balloon 5000
eoc fees 0
interest rate 5%
no opf payments 36



total repaid 11144.84
total interest 1144.84


rough monthly pmt £170.69

IRR 0.698040092662%
APR 8.71

sidicks

12,879 posts

129 months

Sunday 7th March 2010
quotequote all
Manks said:
Whereas "RS6 see you", who is a car finance broker, inputted the figures into his PCP calculator and obtained the figure: £170.70 which also tallies with the answer calculating it manually.

So, your method has been demonstrated to give the incorrect answer.
My number uses the APR, which as you have said is rounded down to the lower 0.1%. By definition the actual IRR (i.e. unrounded APR) will produce the correct answer. I was being a bit lazy when I was using referring to APR rather than IRR.

Given the full cashflows and a simple spreadsheet it is a trivial spreadsheet to tie up with the 'correct' answer.
smile
Sidicks

PS - My car needs a wash too!

text

1 posts

55 months

Monday 16th January 2012
quotequote all
For anyone looking for a quick and dirty pcp calculator online, I have one that I created here http://www.pcpcal.co.uk/ It will let you see what happens when you change the APR, deposit, final payment etc.

I do not make any guarantees over it's accuracy although the model has always been within a few quid of the numbers from dealers quotes that I have had recently.

cailean

779 posts

81 months

Monday 16th January 2012
quotequote all
Nice.
Or you could just save up and pay cash...sorry I couldn't resist....laugh
As you were

blueg33

17,041 posts

132 months

Tuesday 26th January
quotequote all
A PH member did their own spreadsheet on this and made it available. Its very useful, I just cant find it right now

MW-M5

780 posts

30 months

Tuesday 26th January
quotequote all
Manks said:
So you don't think interest is paid on the balloon twice then no?

Manks
rofl


OP - this one isn't too bad- it is only out be a few pounds on the monthlies. You'll need to take one month off the term to get it to work properly i.e if it is a 48 month term enter 47.

http://www.thecalculatorsite.com/finance/calculato...

MW-M5

780 posts

30 months

Tuesday 26th January
quotequote all
Manks said:
When being offered a PCP deal you will, in all probability, be quoted a flat rate.
Any one providing a finance quote is required to provide the APR in the quote. Whilst this may not happen, it is illegal if not provided.