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x type

Original Poster:

452 posts

75 months

[news] 
Tuesday 11th May 2010 quote quote all
Apologies if this has been asked before whistle
Ayone know if I can register a car to my daughter at 16 ?
We've been looking around for a car for her ,just to see what cr.. is available , she's 17 in october.

We're thinking of buying something now ,insure it for me and wife to drive as a spare car ,then
in october she'll have her own insurance in her name as a learner yikes

if we register in my name then transfer owner to her it adds another name on log book ,suppose it doesn't really matter too much an a £1000 shed but would like to know anyway

quotes so far range from £759 -> £10,002 for a 1998 pug 206 as a learner in her own name
quotes range from £1598 to £15,000 in her name as a new qualified driver having just pased her test yikesweeping

think I need to get the correct 6 numbers saturday

leeeeshad

1,209 posts

72 months

[news] 
Tuesday 11th May 2010 quote quote all
yes you can, put you and her mum on the insurance once shes passed (as named drivers) and it will bring it down by a few hundred.

Louisa911

648 posts

75 months

[news] 
Tuesday 11th May 2010 quote quote all
Register the car under your name until she's 17, its no hassle swapping them over later. Especially as she won't be touching it for another half a year.
As for the insurance, that sounds about right. I paid £1300 when I passed my test on my own policy on a 2000 reg 206 1.1 smile

reggie82

1,052 posts

63 months

[news] 
Tuesday 11th May 2010 quote quote all
x type said:
quotes range from £1598 to £15,000 in her name as a new qualified driver having just pased her test yikesweeping
To be fair I think that is pretty good for a 17 year old - just be thankful it isn't a son you are trying to insure!

Adam205

578 posts

67 months

[news] 
Tuesday 11th May 2010 quote quote all
I registered my first car when I was 14. It could look a tad suspicious should you come to insure her as a named driver if she's a previous owner of the car though...
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checkmate91

490 posts

58 months

[news] 
Tuesday 11th May 2010 quote quote all
Just been through this with my 17yo. One of the big insurers said forget it, so I did. Adrian Flux said they have a young driver scheme which they recommend for those that wish to build up their own NCB from day1 rather than go down the named driver route. I chose this as my young driver has his own policy on his own car (spelt Ka) for £3100, it doesn't change if and when he passes. Sounds a lot but the flexibility it brings us if he passes is worth it, the delta between this and the named driver options wasn't worth the bother TBH.

Actually the big insurer didn't say "forget it" but their quote had a 2 at the beginning for provisional (as a named driver only) going up to 5 when passed, which to me was tantamount to the same thing.

The named driver/number of cars in household has pretty much been sussed. And having daughters for children is apparently a better bet.

JK55

169 posts

54 months

[news] 
Tuesday 11th May 2010 quote quote all
x type said:
Apologies if this has been asked before whistle
Ayone know if I can register a car to my daughter at 16 ?
We've been looking around for a car for her ,just to see what cr.. is available , she's 17 in october.

We're thinking of buying something now ,insure it for me and wife to drive as a spare car ,then
in october she'll have her own insurance in her name as a learner yikes

if we register in my name then transfer owner to her it adds another name on log book ,suppose it doesn't really matter too much an a £1000 shed but would like to know anyway

quotes so far range from £759 -> £10,002 for a 1998 pug 206 as a learner in her own name
quotes range from £1598 to £15,000 in her name as a new qualified driver having just pased her test yikesweeping

think I need to get the correct 6 numbers saturday
For the prices you are quoting I would say that you may aswell set fire to your money.

Instead of trying to insure a car for a learner, which costs a fortune, might I suggest that when she wants to get some pre-test practice that she simply hires a car from arnold clark. When I learned to drive, a while back, it was about £9 per hour and I dragged father out about 10 times to get some private practice done.

When she passes her test keep the car in your name. Insure her as a named driver. If you want to be really kind go for one of those policies with the "named driver earns own NCB". This is called "fronting", some people say that it is illegal, regardless of anything else it is NOT AN OFFENCE and the insurance company, unless you say something stupid, MUST PAY OUT IN THE EVENT OF A CLAIM.

In a couple of years transfer the car to her name and let her insure it herself.

When I got my car I had signed in mother's name. She put me as a named driver. I drove it all the time, she drove it about 5 times in two years. Two years later I've signed it over to me and it is insured by me.

Down to the figures.

It was going to cost about £3500 - £5000 to insure it in my name at 17, however, with the right policy in mother's name, £850. In year two that dropped to about £750. When i then signed it over to me it was about 600 for me to insure it.

I am sure you can see that there is a big difference.

carmadgaz

2,563 posts

68 months

[news] 
Tuesday 11th May 2010 quote quote all
JK55 said:
When she passes her test keep the car in your name. Insure her as a named driver. If you want to be really kind go for one of those policies with the "named driver earns own NCB". This is called "fronting", some people say that it is illegal, regardless of anything else it is NOT AN OFFENCE and the insurance company, unless you say something stupid, MUST PAY OUT IN THE EVENT OF A CLAIM.
Where has the popcorn smiley gone scratchchin

DanL

1,600 posts

150 months

[news] 
Tuesday 11th May 2010 quote quote all
JK55 said:
When she passes her test keep the car in your name. Insure her as a named driver. If you want to be really kind go for one of those policies with the "named driver earns own NCB". This is called "fronting", some people say that it is illegal, regardless of anything else it is NOT AN OFFENCE and the insurance company, unless you say something stupid, MUST PAY OUT IN THE EVENT OF A CLAIM.
You're quite wrong, you know - it's fraud, as has been discussed many times before on these forums.

http://www.moneyhighstreet.com/finance-news/car-in...

Adam205

578 posts

67 months

[news] 
Tuesday 11th May 2010 quote quote all
DanL said:
JK55 said:
When she passes her test keep the car in your name. Insure her as a named driver. If you want to be really kind go for one of those policies with the "named driver earns own NCB". This is called "fronting", some people say that it is illegal, regardless of anything else it is NOT AN OFFENCE and the insurance company, unless you say something stupid, MUST PAY OUT IN THE EVENT OF A CLAIM.
You're quite wrong, you know - it's fraud, as has been discussed many times before on these forums.

http://www.moneyhighstreet.com/finance-news/car-in...
The insurance company would have to have evidence that fronting had occured, and that is pretty difficult unless they somehow know who has driven the car more... I'm not condoning it and certainly would never have done it myself, but I was a named driver on a few of my dad's cars and he registered in his own name and even had an accident in one of them and no questions were asked. Had they asked it would have been obvious that it wasn't fronting as I was away at boarding school and the car kept at home...

AB

13,238 posts

80 months

[news] 
Tuesday 11th May 2010 quote quote all
(TTIWWP?) lick

JK55

169 posts

54 months

[news] 
Wednesday 12th May 2010 quote quote all
DanL said:
JK55 said:
When she passes her test keep the car in your name. Insure her as a named driver. If you want to be really kind go for one of those policies with the "named driver earns own NCB". This is called "fronting", some people say that it is illegal, regardless of anything else it is NOT AN OFFENCE and the insurance company, unless you say something stupid, MUST PAY OUT IN THE EVENT OF A CLAIM.
You're quite wrong, you know - it's fraud, as has been discussed many times before on these forums.

http://www.moneyhighstreet.com/finance-news/car-in...
This article is interesting. It appears that they have taken the advice of Steve Sweeney who appears to be head of motor insurance at moneysupermarket. A company who's profits vary depending on the value of the insurance they sell. An independent and impartial source - i think not.

You have to look at the law in practical terms to find that, unless someone says something stupid, the risk is 0.

You have to contend with two facts.
1. Sometimes a car will have more than one regular user.
2. Someone will have to insure it and the other person will be a named driver.

The notion of main driver raises some interesting points.

What if the use was exactley 50/50? Would either driver be entitled to call themselves the main driver? Is there any suggestion that in such a circumstances the drivers are obliged to put the one who is going to cause the insurance to come out at the highest premium as the named driver?

What if the question of who is the main driver becomes unclear?

Lets take a hypothetical example.

You have a parent and a student. The student goes to uni 2.5 miles away 5 days per week. In one week they do 25 miles. Parent takes the car each weekend to go and visit a relative who lives 12.6 miles away. Who is the main driver?

So you see it is not a clear cut question.

In order to escape liability the insurer would have to have evidence that the car was mainly used by the higher risk driver. This is an almost impossible task.

So yes it is technically fraudulent to gain a payout from the insurance by deceiving them into providing cover; however, this is almost unproveable. How the hell would the insurance company ever prove that?

Remember that insurance is taken over a period of time. Even if they could prove there was more use by the named driver over a period of time there would still be time left on the policy for the other driver to make up the percentage use.






snoopstah

391 posts

108 months

[news] 
Wednesday 12th May 2010 quote quote all
JK55 said:
Instead of trying to insure a car for a learner, which costs a fortune...
Really? I learnt to drive in my parents' Golf VR6 and it was very cheap to add me to the insurance as a learner driver.

That was 11 years ago now though.

Funnily enough, once I'd passed my test the insurance became very unreasonable frown

Edited by snoopstah on Wednesday 12th May 18:10

siwil1

953 posts

116 months

[news] 
Wednesday 12th May 2010 quote quote all
I will have this problem next year when my eldest turns 17 so am watching eagerly.

Re the named driver thing we have 2 cars 1 mine, 1 my wifes in each of our names and both named drivers on each others cars.

My car is really only driven by me.commute and general useage. She drives her car for work but only 100ish miles p/w but is the main driver but her car is used as the nice family car and any journeys/holidays etc are in that car with me driving prob overall I do more miles in it than her but less time, Who is the main driver which is the point being made ie very hard to proove either way.

Whats riskier number of miles or time behind the wheel?

steeveeboy

663 posts

58 months

[news] 
Wednesday 12th May 2010 quote quote all
I had a 1.6 astra registered to me this year,
Just fill the logbook in with her details and send it off,
I didnt know if it would work but it did biggrin
The astra was all mine and then was scrapped .lol.
Steve

x type

Original Poster:

452 posts

75 months

[news] 
Wednesday 12th May 2010 quote quote all
JK55 said:
DanL said:
JK55 said:
Lets take a hypothetical example.

You have a parent and a student. The student goes to uni 2.5 miles away 5 days per week. In one week they do 25 miles. Parent takes the car each weekend to go and visit a relative who lives 12.6 miles away. Who is the main driver?
The student is the main driver as they drive it daily

Thanks for the replies so far ,I know it's going to be expensive to insure her

I've tried the furry animal site and it didn't make a blind bit of difference if I added me and the mrs to her policy , hethe insurance quote was the same amount

would still like to know can I register it in her name at 16yr old and insure it ONLY for me and mrs to drive until she's 17

Edited by x type on Wednesday 12th May 20:33

x type

Original Poster:

452 posts

75 months

[news] 
Wednesday 12th May 2010 quote quote all
how do I quote an answer then reply without my reply being in the same box ????????????

DanL

1,600 posts

150 months

[news] 
Wednesday 12th May 2010 quote quote all
JK55 said:
This article is interesting. It appears that they have taken the advice of Steve Sweeney who appears to be head of motor insurance at moneysupermarket. A company who's profits vary depending on the value of the insurance they sell. An independent and impartial source - i think not.
...
Lets take a hypothetical example.

You have a parent and a student. The student goes to uni 2.5 miles away 5 days per week. In one week they do 25 miles. Parent takes the car each weekend to go and visit a relative who lives 12.6 miles away. Who is the main driver?
Well, I'm not going to get into this any further, as we're drifting off topic. smile However, if you want a more impartial source, how about the Guardian?

http://www.guardian.co.uk/money/2009/jul/12/car-in...

Googling "is fronting illegal" brings back a wealth of hits, all of which (at a casual glance) appear to tell you that it is.

In the case of your hypothetical example, clearly the main driver is the student who uses the car five days a week, rather than the parent who only uses it once a week. Who the main driver is can probably be worked out by the contents of the car (CDs in the glove box, stickers on the window, etc) combined with casually asking the neighbours who's car it is...

As for buying a car and registering it in your child's name, and then insuring it under your own, I'm not sure that this would work. I think you have to be the owner of a car to insure it, otherwise you don't (to my mind) have an insurable risk. Otherwise, what stops me taking out a policy on something I don't own, waiting for it to be stolen, and then claiming for it? The example isn't a great one, but hopefully you see the thrust of it!

You might have more luck asking in the Speeding, Plod and the Law forum...

sherman

6,104 posts

100 months

[news] 
Wednesday 12th May 2010 quote quote all
x type said:
how do I quote an answer then reply without my reply being in the same box ????????????
Like this

Press the quote button above thepost you want to quote

and write after the /quote box

RB26DETT

2,519 posts

60 months

[news] 
Wednesday 12th May 2010 quote quote all
Jusr register it in her name no hassle.

I have a Cosworth and Puma in my name without any trouble.

Im 16.

Puma is mine for when i get my licence.
Cosworth was just put into my name as my father rarely drives it, and it keeps the previous no. of owners down.
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