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Maty

Original Poster:

966 posts

101 months

[news] 
Monday 24th May 2010 quote quote all
Less than 12 months ago we glossed all the wood work in the house (doors, door frames and skirting boards), a job I quite simply hated! In most places this has now turned a lovely shade of yellow that I would expect to see in a house occupied by someone smoking 200 fags a day. It therefore needs doing again, but what is the correct process? Last time we just gave everywhere a quick once over with some sand paper then set to it with the gloss, I understand some form of undercoat should have been used???

Or, are there any alternatives to using gloss that might stay white for longer, again what method should we use?

I don't mind doing the job again but it needs doing properly this time.


Thanks

Matt Black

420 posts

58 months

[news] 
Monday 24th May 2010 quote quote all
I use that white Matt paint, can't remember the name of it but it stays white.

Incredible Sulk

3,110 posts

83 months

[news] 
Monday 24th May 2010 quote quote all
I don't know the answer, but in our house white stays white in areas that get direct light, and turns yellow ish in areas that are 'internal' - we have a cloakroom and a couple o f bathrooms that don't have any windows and they have gone a sort of creamy colour.

I used Dulux throughout, so I'm pretty sure it isn't because I used crap paint.

Dave_ST220

8,196 posts

93 months

[news] 
Monday 24th May 2010 quote quote all
Matt Black said:
I use that white Matt paint, can't remember the name of it but it stays white.
egg shell?? Sure that stays white.....

Maty

Original Poster:

966 posts

101 months

[news] 
Monday 24th May 2010 quote quote all
Do you have to undercoat first then, or just sand and paint??


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Matt Black

420 posts

58 months

[news] 
Monday 24th May 2010 quote quote all
Na wasn't eggshell, I just went to the garage to check and it's 'Crown, pure brilliant white, satin'

It's water based so no problems really with fumes and cleaning brushes etc, it definitely stays whiter than Gloss and a light sand is all I done before painting, the only drawback I can see is if it's on banister hand rails or the kids forget to use door handles then it can get dirty quite quickly.

V8mate

37,035 posts

77 months

[news] 
Monday 24th May 2010 quote quote all
Maty said:
Do you have to undercoat first then, or just sand and paint??
I always undercoat before gloss. It just seems to make such a difference to the finish.

ETA: I think that's because it forms a barrier between the wood and the paint. This seems to stop the paint soaking into the wood and the wood 'staining' the paint.

Edited by V8mate on Monday 24th May 16:56

Nolar Dog

8,786 posts

83 months

[news] 
Monday 24th May 2010 quote quote all
Matt Black said:
brilliant white, satin
That makes me laugh. biggrin

Harry Flashman

9,840 posts

130 months

[news] 
Monday 24th May 2010 quote quote all
It's why the woodwork in my house is painted battleship grey.

Well, that and the fact that the grey looks really quite nice with the white walls and dark wood floors.

Vron

2,096 posts

97 months

[news] 
Monday 24th May 2010 quote quote all
Its the sun that keeps it white. Move a wardrobe etc away from the skirting and it will be yellow behind regardless of what paint you use.

callyman

2,905 posts

100 months

[news] 
Sunday 30th May 2010 quote quote all
As said before, all/most oil based paints will yellow if deprived of natural daylight.
Acrylics on the other hand wont.

Phooey

6,104 posts

57 months

[news] 
Sunday 30th May 2010 quote quote all
Vron said:
Its the sun that keeps it white. Move a wardrobe etc away from the skirting and it will be yellow behind regardless of what paint you use.
Yep, i painted my windowsill (south facing) in the office - gloss white about 12 months ago. I also use it as a shelf for letters e.t.c. The areas which have been covered up have now got a permanent yellow tinge. Doh!

Herbie58

1,688 posts

78 months

[news] 
Sunday 30th May 2010 quote quote all
I can only assume that the wood had been treated by the previous occupants or builder. Which means the paint just soaks up the wood treatment and stain. No matter how many times you paint on top, it will keep turning yellow.

The only way to stop it is to put a primer/wood stain prevention treatment on prior to painting. You'll have to give the current paintwork a good sand. Then paint everything with the primer/stain stop, then you can paint it with gloss.

You can get the primer in B&Q or homebase - it's widely available

andy43

3,664 posts

142 months

[news] 
Sunday 30th May 2010 quote quote all
Did the previous occupants have an incontinence problem that you're aware of?

dtmpower

3,639 posts

133 months

[news] 
Sunday 30th May 2010 quote quote all
Is the finish just generally yellowed or is it yellow in spots ?

When reglossing I just tend to light sand and then use sugar soap to degrease.

A good quality liquid gloss should last several years.

If you have yellow spots then it might be the wood seeping sap through the paint. You can get a knot blocker to paint over these spots to block the sap.

Huntsman

4,442 posts

138 months

[news] 
Sunday 30th May 2010 quote quote all
I'm an ex decorator.

Quick scuff with some scrath, wipe down with white spirit.

Undercoat and gloss. Try the 1 ltr tins of 'Dulux trade' they do in B and Q. I found it very good. Dont waste time with 'one coat wonder' paints or water based.

You'll always find gloss yellows a bit in time, the eggshells and satin finishes dont seem to suffer as much. Again avoid water based.

Raverbaby

839 posts

74 months

[news] 
Sunday 30th May 2010 quote quote all
I found the "quick dry" gloss tends to stay white.
Its water based, as opposed to oil I think.

Edited by Raverbaby on Sunday 30th May 22:39

Phooey

6,104 posts

57 months

[news] 
Thursday 10th June 2010 quote quote all
Thought i would resurrect this thread rather than starting another smile

I have 2 doors and frames to paint this weekend - white. Last time i used Dulux Liquid Gloss Professional, but after a year has started to 'yellow' in areas which do not get the natural daylight.
The doors are bare wood, and the frames are white gloss currently. So, i understand i need to prime and undercoat the doors, and just undercoat the frames first.

Any more recommendations for white paint that stays white? I like the coverage of gloss (used a small roller last time) but realise this *will* yellow.
Would i be better using Dulux Satinwood (non waterbased)?

The doors are just flush flat (non paneled), so i want to use a mini-roller again - i am under the impression that because of the cr4p coverage of water-based paints, this would/could be a problem - so would i be better off with non-waterbased to achieve a better finish. With these doors being flush non-paneled, i *need* the best finish possible.

What do you guys recommend?

Cheers

callyman

2,905 posts

100 months

[news] 
Thursday 10th June 2010 quote quote all
Best way to get a flat finish on a flat door is to take to door off if poss and lay it flat, then use a fine roller, get it on reasonably thick and it will self level to some degree, that will give you a very good smooth finish.

xllifts

3,720 posts

91 months

[news] 
Thursday 10th June 2010 quote quote all
Use permoglaze undercoat and gloss its acrylic and will last for ages. Bit expensive but worth every penny.

Remember preparation is the art to a good finish, always sand back and undercoat then apply gloss.
You are sometimes better to put two thin coats of gloss on as opposed to one thicker coat gives a smooth deep finish.
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