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sawman

3,296 posts

118 months

[news] 
Monday 6th December 2010 quote quote all
Defcon5 said:
Will the air con actually work at the temps we are talking about here though? I was under the impression the compressor wont kick in to stop it damaging itself below certain temps
I can testify that the compressor for air con runs at -30c (on '98 jeep cherokees at least!)

McSam

5,780 posts

63 months

[news] 
Monday 6th December 2010 quote quote all
Gizmo! said:
McSam said:
Ian Geary said:
my MR2 t-bar used to get this problem, which is of course caused by a damp car

I used the cat litter in bag idea as a cheap way to absorb moisture - I actually crafted a bag from kitcken towels and masking tape (must have had more time on my hands back then), but a vacumn bag also does the job (tip from honest john website)

The t-bar leakage was cut by spraying silicone spray onto the seals. Assumming your car isn't a t-bar, this stuff from a Halfords yellow spray can should help refresh door, window and sunroof seals for cars that do have proper roofs.

otherwise, I'd try and find the source of the leak if this is a serious problem.

But as other posters have said, snow from your shoes and even your breath is probably enough to cause a haze of ice on the windows each morning


Ian
Any more detail on the method for using this silicone spray? Is it simply a matter of giving the seals on all the doors and windows(?) a good dousing with the stuff? I'm fairly sure the Audi's seals are pretty weak, damn thing has a prodigious capability to steam up.
Look on IMOC.co.uk - instructions there.

In brief as I remember it: Squidge a decent amount of silicone bath sealant around the contact patches of the roof. Cover in clingfilm, and fit the roof panel. Leave to dry overnight, remove roof, remove clingfilm, win.
I don't have an MR2 wink I wondered if the method Ian mentioned could be effective on a saloon?
sawman said:
Defcon5 said:
Will the air con actually work at the temps we are talking about here though? I was under the impression the compressor wont kick in to stop it damaging itself below certain temps
I can testify that the compressor for air con runs at -30c (on '98 jeep cherokees at least!)
Depends on the car, some run whatever, some cut off at a certain exterior temperature, as far as I know it's purely to save fuel / remove unnecessary engine load, rather than because of any risk of damage to the compressor.

CDP

5,077 posts

142 months

[news] 
Monday 6th December 2010 quote quote all
Ian Geary said:
I used the cat litter in bag idea as a cheap way to absorb moisture
Did you pick out the brown bits first or am I thinking too cheaply?

sebhaque

4,053 posts

69 months

[news] 
Tuesday 7th December 2010 quote quote all
A towel, split bin bag, or cardboard box on the outside prevents freezing. Sprinkle some fairy liquid and spread over the inside and it prevents misting up.

parapaul

2,828 posts

86 months

[news] 
Tuesday 7th December 2010 quote quote all
CDP said:
Ian Geary said:
I used the cat litter in bag idea as a cheap way to absorb moisture
Did you pick out the brown bits first or am I thinking too cheaply?
Too cheap hehe the brown bits contain unnecessary moisture too.

I had an icy car this time last year thanks to a numpty garage deciding to steam clean the seats irked and when the ice melted, it kept steaming up.

Short of the cat litter there's not a lot you can do now, but when the summer gets here, change the pollen filter.
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Mastodon2

9,733 posts

53 months

[news] 
Tuesday 7th December 2010 quote quote all
Not leaving your mats wet helps a lot. I had a few freeze overs last winter (all windows frozen inside) and it was mainly due to walking around in the rain and leaving my rubber floor mats wet. The moisture was just sitting there, fogging the car up inside once I parked up and turned the heating blower off (no fancy air con here!) and then freezing over night.

Bang your shoes together before driving to clear excess snow and slush, and carry some kitchen roll in your car to wipe the excess moisture from your mats. The inside of your car will now have considerably less moisture inside and will defrost quickly should an inside freeze occur. I've only had one inner freeze this winter, and that was my back passenger windows, and only a very thin layer of ice.

If you've got rubber mats, wipe them down. If you've got carpet mats, consider removing them overnight. Either way, it will help a lot to consider how to minimise the moisture you bring into the car with wet clothing and shoes.

cptsideways

10,854 posts

140 months

[news] 
Tuesday 7th December 2010 quote quote all
Open the windows for the last mile or 5 mins of each journey, usually does the trick

naffa

Original Poster:

383 posts

86 months

[news] 
Tuesday 7th December 2010 quote quote all
Some interesting suggestions put forward guys.

I dont have aircon so cant try that tip.

I dont have hot water bottles so cant try that.

I've got a kettle and some kitchen towel though, might be wrth a try!

Pints

16,243 posts

82 months

[news] 
Tuesday 7th December 2010 quote quote all
cptsideways said:
Open the windows for the last mile or 5 mins of each journey, usually does the trick
This is quite good. Especially if you've had the heater on and the car's nice and toasty. When the window's opened, the warm, moist air disappears out the window.
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