AC Schnitzer creates even hotter M135i


We didn't think the fabulous BMW M135i need much in the way of extra power, but respected BMW tuner AC Schnitzer has decided to give it an extra 40hp anyway as part of a tuning package for the car.

The motorsport-rooted Germans have pushed the three-litre six-cylinder turbocharged petrol engine to 360hp using means we're not sure of yet. We'll find out more when the tuning package is revealed at Germany's tuner show at Essen at the beginning of next month.

Full package includes lowered suspension
Full package includes lowered suspension
Given the current car sprints to 62mph in just 5.1 seconds, that'll mean a new time into the fours, although Schnitzer hasn't said what exactly that is.

The firm reckons that its power hike hasn't affected the amazingly low 188g/km CO2 figure (equating to 35mpg).

The full tuning kit includes sports suspension package that lowers the car by 25mm. There's also a range of visual tweaks that differentiate the car without it looking too lairy, including new wheels, extended chin spoiler and new lower grille.

Prices haven't been annouced, but if you're keen, luckily your start point for the standard car is pretty good at £29,995. The Schnitzer cosmetic /upgrades are also available for the standard 1-series.

 

 

 

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Comments (62) Join the discussion on the forum

  • Mermaid 06 Dec 2012

    drpep said:
    playalistic said:
    Schnitzer cosmetics are such a huge fail.
    Completely agree.

    They're the design equivalent of German Techno music; vacuous.

    Those wheels are straight off a waankers Astra.
    Excellent summary.

  • kikiturbo 06 Dec 2012

    Bladedancer said:
    I'm not forgetting anything.
    You take oxygen from the air and burn carbohydrates in the fuel. You get energy, CO2, water and various nitrus oxides.
    Unless you're counting CO2 that gets into the engine in the air, you can only get CO2 only by burning carbs in the fuel, so in those 60 grams.
    Furthermore, combustion is not 100% effective, so instead of getting just CO2 you get CO and other things (like Acetaldehyde, depending on fuel used)
    If (mass wise) carbon is about 27% of mass of CO2, so 60 grams of pure carbon would give you over 220 grams of CO2 in perfect combustion. But those 60 grams are not pure carbon but something more like C8H18 or CH4.
    speaking off the top of my head... about 14% of car's exhaust (for petrol engines) is CO2... 71% is N2..

    if you burn 60g of fuel, you will mix it with 14,7x60= 882 grams of air... so total is 942 grams.... it then explodes, and for the sake of argument we get 942 grams of exhaust.... 14% of which is 132 grams of CO2....
    Now, I know I am not 100% right, but I am close enough..smile

  • Bladedancer 06 Dec 2012

    kikiturbo said:
    you are forgetting that it is not fuel alone that is burning inside the engine, but air/fuel mixture... and at stochiometric ratio, that most engines try to run as much as possible (due to cat efficiency), you have 14.7 times more air (by mass) then fuel in the mix.. smile

    also, as far as I see... official CO2 figure is always related to mixed fuel consumption... but I can check if you like..
    I'm not forgetting anything.
    You take oxygen from the air and burn carbohydrates in the fuel. You get energy, CO2, water and various nitrus oxides.
    Unless you're counting CO2 that gets into the engine in the air, you can only get CO2 only by burning carbs in the fuel, so in those 60 grams.
    Furthermore, combustion is not 100% effective, so instead of getting just CO2 you get CO and other things (like Acetaldehyde, depending on fuel used)
    If (mass wise) carbon is about 27% of mass of CO2, so 60 grams of pure carbon would give you over 220 grams of CO2 in perfect combustion. But those 60 grams are not pure carbon but something more like C8H18 or CH4.

  • kikiturbo 05 Dec 2012

    Bladedancer said:
    So according to this 60g of fuel turns into round 200 or so g of CO2?
    CO2 isn't the only product of burning fuel...
    you are forgetting that it is not fuel alone that is burning inside the engine, but air/fuel mixture... and at stochiometric ratio, that most engines try to run as much as possible (due to cat efficiency), you have 14.7 times more air (by mass) then fuel in the mix.. smile

    also, as far as I see... official CO2 figure is always related to mixed fuel consumption... but I can check if you like..

  • Bladedancer 04 Dec 2012

    kikiturbo said:
    well, CO2 is a direct product of burning petrol... and if you are not runnning really rich mixtures (giving you excessive ammounts of CO instead of CO2) then there is a direct link between CO2 g/km and l/km (mpg).. the more fuel you burn, more CO2 you produce.. smile
    If one was to look at it this way, all CO2 figures are meaningless as they would only work for manufacturer-provided MPG figures, which assume certain driving conditions, fuel quality etc etc.

    In this case your CO2 figure would depend on your driving style and someone driving a 1.2 litre round 4k RPM should pay more car tax than me cruising at 2k RPM in my 3 litre.

    CO2 values are not provided in a range but fixed figure. It is no doubt averaged in some magic way (to make it totally irrelevant and meaningless) but I always wondered how they arrive at that number.

    Take this:
    A car does 8 litres per 100km (35MPG).

    If 8 litres = 100 km then 1 km = 0,08 litre

    Gasoline density is 0,75 kg/l = 750g/l

    If 750g = 1 litre then 0,08 litre = 60g

    Therefore, 1 km = 60g of fuel.

    So according to this 60g of fuel turns into round 200 or so g of CO2?
    CO2 isn't the only product of burning fuel...

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