Beijing show: Jag's Supercharged V6 and turbo four


Jaguar has used the Beijing motor show to announce the introduction of two new forced-induction petrol engines for its cars - a 3.0-litre supercharged V6 and a 2.0-litre turbocharged four-cylinder motor.


So while the main 'in-the-metal' news for Jaguar is the new XJ Ultimate - one of the first two products from JLR's new 'Engineered to Order' department, the other being the Beckhamised Range Rover Evoque - it's the under-the-bonnet bits that are the most significant.

The XJ Ultimate will be the first Jaguar to get the new supercharged V6, with a 340hp and 332lb ft state of tune that it will share with the XF, while the version of the engine due to go in the forthcoming F-Type sports car will get 380hp and 339lb ft of torque.

The new V6 is actually a development of the 5.0-litre supercharged V8, sharing its all-aluminium construction and with cross-bolted main bearing caps to increase rigidity and refinement. The Roots-type supercharger is mounted within the 'V' of the engine and is more compact than the one used in the V8. Its boost, meanwhile electronically 'supervised' by new Bosch engine management software, which Jaguar reckons can offer up to a 20 per cent improvement in efficiency.


Talking of efficiency, the engine gets stop/start functionality, while the gearbox is the eight-speed ZF unit also used in diesel XFs. Jaguar's engineers have also come up with a system of counter-rotating front and rear balancer weights, lending the six-cylinder unit the same smoothness and refinement characteristics as its larger V8 brother.

The 2.0-litre petrol, meanwhile, will replace the naturally aspirated 3.0-litre V6 petrol (in such markets where the models still exists) in both the XF and XJ and will get 240hp and 251lb ft.

In both applications, this will be enough to haul the cars to 60mph from rest in 7.5 seconds on the way to 150mph, while the 340hp supercharged V6 will do the 0-60mph sprint in 5.7 seconds before hitting a limited 155mph top speed.

Comments (65) Join the discussion on the forum

  • AlexS 25 Apr 2012

    Otispunkmeyer said:
    Just need to lob in some balancer shafts... or as the JLR boys have done, put counter-rotating weights front and rear. Adds to the cost of the engine and is another set of things to wear and go wrong. But its cheaper than redesigning a block and then retooling a factory to make it! Besides I am sure there are a lot more V6's that were born out of larger V8 engines and even 60 degree V's don't give you perfect balance... its just not as bad.

    Only 3 engine arrangements offer perfect balance

    I6
    V12
    Rotary/wankel

    the rest all need some kind of additional balancing depending on their size. A 2.2 petrol four probably has twin balancers, but smaller engines like a 1.6 generally have acceptable levels of vibration. A 90 deg V6 generally suffers the same end to end vibrations you get in a 3 cylinder engine. Only need 1 balance shaft nestled in the valley and it can be controlled (I4's need a pair to cope!). Mercedes managed it with their V6's made from V8 blueprints.
    The 90° v8 with a cross-plane crank can also be perfectly balanced via the use of counterbalance weights on the crank shaft.

  • zthomasz 25 Apr 2012

    Lowtimer said:
    If this new supercharged V6 is based on the old V8, that rather implies that it is a 90 degree included angle design, i.e. basically a 90 degree V8 with the front two cylinders sawn off, rather than the normal 60 degree included angle V6. In which case it won't be very smooth at all. The last time we had a mass produced engine with that layout was the Douvrin V6 used by Peugeot, Renault and Volvo (not to mention De Lorean). It was sort of OK but nothing special at all.
    Porsche Panamera v6? Thats a 90 degree v8 with two cylinders sawn off.

  • LuS1fer 24 Apr 2012

    AlexiusG55 said:
    Well, GM sold their "3800" 90-degree Buick V6, a distant cousin of the Rover V8, until 2008. I don't think anything with that engine was ever sold in Europe, but they did make a lot of them.
    Assuming this is the same 3800 V6 used in the 4th gen Camaro, that was sold here officially from 1998-2000 - probably longer in mainland Europe where LHD was not such a perceived drawback and where the 3.8 (I believe) made more tax sense than the 5.7 V8.

  • gweaver 24 Apr 2012

    AlexiusG55 said:
    Lowtimer said:
    If this new supercharged V6 is based on the old V8, that rather implies that it is a 90 degree included angle design, i.e. basically a 90 degree V8 with the front two cylinders sawn off, rather than the normal 60 degree included angle V6. In which case it won't be very smooth at all. The last time we had a mass produced engine with that layout was the Douvrin V6 used by Peugeot, Renault and Volvo (not to mention De Lorean). It was sort of OK but nothing special at all.
    Well, GM sold their "3800" 90-degree Buick V6, a distant cousin of the Rover V8, until 2008. I don't think anything with that engine was ever sold in Europe, but they did make a lot of them.

    The Maserati Biturbo V6 (descended from the F1 engines by way of the Merak) also outlasted the Douvrin by a couple of years.
    The Rover KV6 was also 90 degrees and a very nice engine, if a bit thirsty.

  • Mattmeister 24 Apr 2012

    Calm down folks! inline 4 is not coming to the uk, its only to replace nat asp V6 (in other markets) -it was discontinued in the uk around 2 years ago.


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