Ecoboost-Powered Radical Revealed


Radical is set to reveal the latest version of its hardcore track car/road-legal racer - the SR3 SL - at the Autosport show in January.

According to Radical, the SL will be the company's most advanced sports car ever, and will be powered by a version of Ford's new 2.0-litre, Euro5-compliant Ecoboost engine.

This brand-new turbocharged unit features Twin-Independent Variable Cam Timing and state-of-the-art, high-pressure Direct Injection, and transmits its power to the road via a six-speed sequential gearbox. Radical has also tweaked the motor to provide it with 300bhp as standard.

And if the paddle-shift gearchange, fly-by-wire throttle, and 675kg kerb weight isn't extreme enough for you, Radical will offer a Race Pack, which includes options such as engine calibration map selection (giving 'road, 'wet' and 'racetrack' maps), an FIA-approved fuel cell, a bi-plane rear wing and racing tyre options.

As well as the SR3 SL, Radical will also reveal the SR8 RX with a new 2.7-litre RPX V8 at the Autosport show from 13-16 January.

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Comments (105) Join the discussion on the forum

  • juansolo 25 Dec 2010

    Colin 1985 said:
    juansolo said:
    Engine and box will still require rebuilds. You cannot do 100000 miles with just servicing on these sorts of car,regardless of what engine is in it. Radial will publish the interval, on an 'unstressed' car engine expect 80-100 hours.
    Can anyone explain what work is done during a rebuild, what parts are renewed? Is it things like piston rings, liners etc. or is it mostly to assess if something needs doing?
    I suspect it'll be things like that plus anything else that found that needs replacing. We've got all the bits they replaced from the last rebuild (before we bought the car), There's a LOT of kit in there including stuff you might not have replaced had you not been racing it. Really should go through it all at some point...

  • Colin 1985 24 Dec 2010

    juansolo said:
    Engine and box will still require rebuilds. You cannot do 100000 miles with just servicing on these sorts of car,regardless of what engine is in it. Radial will publish the interval, on an 'unstressed' car engine expect 80-100 hours.
    Can anyone explain what work is done during a rebuild, what parts are renewed? Is it things like piston rings, liners etc. or is it mostly to assess if something needs doing?

  • The Wookie 23 Dec 2010

    Scuffers said:
    chuntington101 said:
    From what i have heard the 'busa engine is a very stong and robust little engine. they seem to be able to hold upto a lot of abuse without problems. the turbo guys have push over 500bhp through stock blocks.
    this is more a case of people talking, and engine that do one dodgy dyno run, never to see the light of day again though.

    Yes, you can boost them to hell, but they will not last 1 lap of somewhere like Silverstone GP...

    I keep reading about stock K20's with turbo's doing 900-1000+ bhp, however, never actually seen one in a car that's still moving.
    A friend of a friend built a Busa Turbo Caterham that was pushing out something approaching 400bhp, not aware he had any problems with engine longevity... he has however had significant problems with chassis longevity hehe

  • Scuffers 23 Dec 2010

    rhinochopig said:
    Jack Frost (of Holeshot Racing) is running a 700bhp turbo 'busa engine in his land-speed bike. There is also an identical engine in a megabusa - the turbo is nearly the same diameter as the 13" wheel hehe

    When dry sumped, It's not the engine that tends to die in a BEC, it's the box.
    Jacks done some monsters, but I still don't think one would survive long in a track race environment...

  • rhinochopig 23 Dec 2010

    chuntington101 said:
    juansolo said:
    Scuffers said:
    juansolo said:
    One thing that was mentioned to us that as we weren't racing ours the rebuilds would be less frequent. Apparently one was taken apart that was mainly used to trackdays and demos for 100hrs and it was still in top condition. I suppose its more for the racers on that front that want a guaranteed top performing engine. We've stuck a timer on ours so we know what we've done and we're going to play it by ear.
    that's very much the case...

    as with most things, it really comes down to how it's used, with all the will in the world, you cannot drive on a trackday like you would when racing, you might string a lap together, but no way can you do this for 20 mins +

    the way you guys are doing just trackdays, I can see it been good for 500+ hours easy

    also, some drivers are harder on engines than others, simple fact of life.

    K20 wise, unless they have an issue, never seen one eat the bearing's, that does happen is the pistons/rings/bores wear, and a simple leak-down test is as good as anything to asses how bad this is.
    Yup I think the minimum length a race is in VdeV/Speed is 3hrs, so they're tonking on like this for that long and it's still a 80hr interval. Strong little engine.
    From what i have heard the 'busa engine is a very stong and robust little engine. they seem to be able to hold upto a lot of abuse without problems. the turbo guys have push over 500bhp through stock blocks.
    Jack Frost (of Holeshot Racing) is running a 700bhp turbo 'busa engine in his land-speed bike. There is also an identical engine in a megabusa - the turbo is nearly the same diameter as the 13" wheel hehe

    When dry sumped, It's not the engine that tends to die in a BEC, it's the box.

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