Facebook fool


We've probably all put things up on Facebook that we regretted sharing with the world. It's unlikely they resulted in a jail sentence though.

But then, if you use a social networking page to publicly try and recruit an accomplice in a plot to pervert the course of justice, you might expect a pretty stern response. And that's exactly what Scott Woodburn from Rotherham got, after posting on Facebook to see if anyone would be willing to take the fall for a three-point fixed penalty that would have seen him banned if he'd admitted to it.

Well, he got his ban anyway. And five months in prison for his trouble. Meanwhile, the chap who volunteered to take the points - despite not having a driving licence - for a reported £250 earned himself an 11-week suspended sentence too.

In a statement on its website South Yorkshire Safety Camera Partnership has wasted little opportunity for a bit of finger wagging in an effort to make an example of Woodburn. "Hopefully this case will send a warning to anyone who would consider anything so irresponsible," an unnamed spokesperson is quoted as saying. "Woodburn showed no regard for anyone else. He was prepared to drive at excessive speed, once caught rather than changing the manner of his driving he selfishly paid to have someone else to take the blame so that he could continue behaving as before."

Anyone got that Jean-Luc Picard double facepalm image to hand?

 

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  • UK952 25 Jan 2013

    Leebo310 said:
    Agree to an extent but increasing speed limits wouldn't cure bad/inattentive/stupid driving. All it would do is increase the damage when an accident does happen.
    Also the roads changing speed limits from years ago is surely due to the increasing amount of traffic on the roads? Number of cars increases pretty massively every year and there's only so fast you can go in a long line of traffic.
    Generally if people just drove to the speed limits and got to them reasonably quickly, then it would be fine. The delays and frustration comes from people driving below the limits, or taking ages to pull off, or not paying attention etc. My biggest annoyance is getting stuck behind someone doing 30/40 on a 60 road. Doesn't mean it's a problem with the speed of the road, just the person in front who decides to make up their own limit!
    I find it much harder to concentrate when driving excessively slowly, my mind wanders, I play with the radio, make a hands free phone call etc. On a trackday I am very focused. I dont think I have evolved differently from others

  • predding 14 Jan 2013

    Classic example of what makes me drive defensively these days - I am sharing the roads with cretins like this

  • LuS1fer 11 Jan 2013

    Leebo310 said:
    Agree to an extent but increasing speed limits wouldn't cure bad/inattentive/stupid driving. All it would do is increase the damage when an accident does happen.
    Also the roads changing speed limits from years ago is surely due to the increasing amount of traffic on the roads? Number of cars increases pretty massively every year and there's only so fast you can go in a long line of traffic.
    Generally if people just drove to the speed limits and got to them reasonably quickly, then it would be fine. The delays and frustration comes from people driving below the limits, or taking ages to pull off, or not paying attention etc. My biggest annoyance is getting stuck behind someone doing 30/40 on a 60 road. Doesn't mean it's a problem with the speed of the road, just the person in front who decides to make up their own limit!
    They are also set and subsequently reduced, in many cases, based on accident figures for the road in question. One of our local dual carriageways was reduced to 50 after a number of serious accidents along it.

  • Leebo310 11 Jan 2013

    I WISH said:
    Absolutely agree.

    "Speed" doesn't kill. Bad driving, inattentive driving, stupid driving can kill. Excessive speed in inappropriate circumstances might contribute to a fatal accident.
    Agree to an extent but increasing speed limits wouldn't cure bad/inattentive/stupid driving. All it would do is increase the damage when an accident does happen.
    Also the roads changing speed limits from years ago is surely due to the increasing amount of traffic on the roads? Number of cars increases pretty massively every year and there's only so fast you can go in a long line of traffic.
    Generally if people just drove to the speed limits and got to them reasonably quickly, then it would be fine. The delays and frustration comes from people driving below the limits, or taking ages to pull off, or not paying attention etc. My biggest annoyance is getting stuck behind someone doing 30/40 on a 60 road. Doesn't mean it's a problem with the speed of the road, just the person in front who decides to make up their own limit!

  • I WISH 10 Jan 2013

    UK952 said:
    big_rob_sydney said:
    Yes, the law is the law.

    Unfortunately, many people think the law gets it wrong on occassion. When you look overseas and see countries with graduated points systems (eg Australia), maybe its time to question the law, eh?

    I get a little tired of the people that blindly follow the law without questioning. I get more tired still of authorities (police officers, et al) who blindly follow a bad law to begin with.

    And possibly worse of all, is "the machine", whose only intent is to screw the populace into obedience through overbearing sentencing.

    Civil disobedience is no bad thing, provided its not violent. Could you just imagine each and every driver refusing to pay fines? What would the government do? They cant remove licenses from everyone, as the economy would grind to a halt. Twould be interesting, but in a practical sense, it would never happen.
    Indeed, and it is also a shame that there is no consistency in setting speed limits or even any real thought behind them - lower is almost always seen as better.

    Speed doesn't kill, its inattention and poor observation that kill. Slow people down excessively and they become distracted and inattentive - not good for road safety.

    Back on topic, He was very foolish but probably doesn't need 5 (2.5) months to realise it, a couple of weeks would probably be more than enough to ensure it doesn't happen again.

    Tony
    Absolutely agree.

    "Speed" doesn't kill. Bad driving, inattentive driving, stupid driving can kill. Excessive speed in inappropriate circumstances might contribute to a fatal accident. But then the authorities might classify doing 34mph in what used to be a 40 mph zone as "excessive speed".

    How many of us know of examples of areas where the speed limit was 30 or 40 or 50 mph for decades with no apparent or untoward problems only to wake up one morning and find the limit has been arbitrarily reduced to 20 30 or 40? I am a member of my local Parish Council where I seem to spend most of my time trying to persuade them NOT to request that the County Council Highways Department reduce all the local limits to 20mph. The only science behind these decisions (made by a tiny minority of the population on others' behalf) is that "it seems like a good idea".

    There is far too much attention paid to speed limits and "speeding" - when addressing road design and signage and surface quality and roadcraft education for kids AND adults would pay much bigger dividends in terms of improved safety.

    sperm

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