The Rover V8 will burble again

V8 nestling in a TVR engine bay
V8 nestling in a TVR engine bay
The Rover V8 is dead -- long live the Rover V8!

Despite reports of its imminent death, the famous V8, used in many Solihull-built Land Rover products, is alive and burbling and in production in the UK. MCT, the West Country based engineering and manufacturing specialist, has won a contract from Land Rover for the continuation of production to support the aftermarket requirement for original equipment engines.

Production has been relocated from the home of Land Rover at Solihull to MCT’s plant in Weston-super-Mare. MCT will also handle sourcing and procurement of components and sub-assemblies, as well as testing and supply of the finished product.

For over 40 years this famous V8 engine, with displacements from 3.5 to 4.6, has powered the cream of British marques including Land Rover Defender, Discovery and Range Rover, Rover P5B, P6 and SD1, MGB GT, Triumph, Morgan and TVR. It is also the standard British engine for all hot rod use and special versions powered the Formula 1 winning Brabham team. It’s not surprising therefore that in 2005 Engine Technology International magazine and journalist Keith Read voted it “ the greatest engine of all time”.

MCT's customers include Ford, Land Rover, GM, Mitsubishi, Isuzu, Subaru, Caterham and LDV.

MD Peter Roberts said: “We are delighted to have been selected by Land Rover Ltd against strong global competition. This shows that small and medium British manufacturing and engineering companies can compete for high-end added value projects because of our high quality skills, flexible manufacturing environment and know how. Focussing in these areas will ensure that the UK can consolidate and focus its manufacturing sector and achieve greater success.”

TVR SV8, Chimaera and Griff owners can breathe sighs of relief...

Comments (108) Join the discussion on the forum

  • biglepton 17 Jan 2008

    ZaphodBeeblebrox said:
    Rover V8 related to the 507 engine? hmm.. not seen a rover V8 with hemi heads, or pushrods going though the block.
    The Buick 215ci was based very loosely on the BMW 507 V8, but certainly not officially so. When Buick were tasked in 1956 to design an aluminium V8 engine with a capacity between 3 and 3.5 litres they weren't quite sure how to go about it or how durable such an engine would be as they had no experience of working in this metal. They did what car companies still do today and buy the nearest equivalent they can and reverse engineer it. In 1956/7 if you needed to buy an ally V8 around 3.2l you had only one choice and that was the BMW 507. They most certainly didn't copy the design and stick GM on it, but they did use it as a basis for their design with particular regard to the necessary strengths and thicknesses required by ally instead of iron.

    You are probably wondering how I know this? wink Well, my godfather was a production engineer at Rover for most of the sixties and seventies and he told me. He found out in 1969 - GM ended up regretting selling the rights to the 215 and wanted it back. They approached Rover and offered to buy it back but Rover refused as the management realised it's potential. Rover went back to GM and offered to build the V8 for GM. Initial discussions took place and my godfather ended up talking directly to the engine design part of GM/Buick and commented on what a great engine they'd designed considering it was their first ally one and the GM guy told him he couldn't take all the credit becasue they'd pulled apart a BMW V8 while they were designing it to get the basics right. Eventually the deal for Rover to build the V8 for GM fell apart because they couldn't build them cheap enough and politically it was difficult for GM to buy 'foreign-built' engines.

    So the RV8 certainly isn't a copy of the 507 V8, but it did play a part in it's birth! biggrin

  • skwdenyer 17 Jan 2008

    dinkel said:
    Isuzu diesel for Opel, Honda

    Renault V6 for Volvo

    Loads . . .
    Isuzu is owned by GM, as is Opel, so that's a GM car using a GM engine.

    The PRV6 used by Volvo was built at Douvrin but the name means Peugeot Renault Volvo - it was JV engine, not a transplant.

    The Honda was a straightforward customer engine, however.

  • Tunku 20 Oct 2007

    ZaphodBeeblebrox said:
    Mannginger said:
    Welcome, but I have to ask...how on earth did you dig this topic up from so long ago? What were you searching for?

    confused
    Oddly I was looking for the definitive answer as to the differance between the P6 low compresion v8 and the early SD1 V8, one has a 9.25:1 CR and the other 9.35:1 which is a little small to be pistins (not impossible, but hightly unlikly), but knowing that the heads were revised thought this may be where the raised CR comes from.

    Stewart
    Many years ago my mate had a SD1 V8, he had it turboed, sounded and went lovely. Went to Italy and back a couple of times in it, with the speedo needle hanging off the edge on the autobahnen. Eventually stuffed it in a hedge. Great engine, he used to tease the early Golf Gtis with it by wheel spinning in 3rd as he went past.

  • ZaphodBeeblebrox 20 Oct 2007

    dinkel said:
    Yep that is indeed mine, the curent project is a '76 single strap SD1

    Stewart

  • ZaphodBeeblebrox 20 Oct 2007

    Mannginger said:
    Welcome, but I have to ask...how on earth did you dig this topic up from so long ago? What were you searching for?

    confused
    Oddly I was looking for the definitive answer as to the differance between the P6 low compresion v8 and the early SD1 V8, one has a 9.25:1 CR and the other 9.35:1 which is a little small to be pistins (not impossible, but hightly unlikly), but knowing that the heads were revised thought this may be where the raised CR comes from.

    Stewart

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