Aston and AMG: it's official!


So the rumours were true; Mercedes-AMG and Aston Martin will collaborate on future models. An announcement today confirmed a letter of intent has been signed on a move 'towards a technical partnership'.

Coming to an Aston near you soon...
Coming to an Aston near you soon...
A partnership that initially seems more advantageous to Aston rather than AMG. It's no secret that Aston Martin urgently requires new powertrain technology, a 6.0-litre V12 and 4.7-litre V8 not suited to selling vehicles in markets with stringent emissions laws. This latest agreement will allow Aston Martin to launch a new generation of models incorporating 'cutting-edge technology and newly-developed V8 powertrains'.

It's not as if AMG doesn't have a few V8s in its stable. Whilst the 6208cc unit that thunders away in the C63 isn't long for this world, the 5.5-litre twin-turbo found in the S63(and nearly every other Merc) would surely be a perfect fit for the larger Astons. Moreover, the naturally aspirated, cylinder-deactivating 420hp variant, as found in the SLK55, could presumably work in something like a V8 Vantage.

The proposed deal will also give Aston access to 'certain components of electric/electronic architecture'. Along with the mention of cutting edge tech, it can be surmised that a hybrid powertrain is probably on the cards. Aston has recently displayed its abilities with hydrogen, although a conventional hybrid appears likely in the immediate future. Furthermore, this should allow Aston to upgrade its rather dated infotainment technology.

A more efficient Aston, still with a V8? Sounds good!
A more efficient Aston, still with a V8? Sounds good!
So what does AMG gain? Today's announcement outlines that Daimler AG 'will own a stake of up to five per cent non-voting shares in Aston Martin depending on the progress of the agreement'. But with both engineering teams working together, a transfer of skills between the two is surely inevitable also.

AMG's head Ola Kallenius commented that the deal is 'a real win-win for both sides' and 'proof of AMG's technological and performance expertise'.

Ian Minards, Aston's Product Development Director, added that working with AMG whilst remaining independent 'points to a very bright future for the company'. Indeed it does!

As yet, there aren't any firm details on how the partnership will progress. We'll be sure to share any news as soon as it arrives.

P.H. O'meter

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Comments (206) Join the discussion on the forum

  • spyker138 18 Aug 2013

    What Aston needed were lighter, smaller, naturally aspirated engines that sound great, and are 'hand-assembled'. This would fit all the brand hype of being good old fashioned hand-made sports cars, and improve dynamics and look of the cars by allowing lower centre of gravity, proper front-mid location and lower scuttle/dash.

    I would recommend the GM LS7 as fulfilling all these criteria and having the potential to be just as potent as anything AMG. AM can by them as crate engines without any special deal and customers that want to can even help with the assembly (for a fee).

    I own a DB4 so I do know about AM DNA and despite the lack of DOHC (and the height and weight that brings) I can think of no better engine for a proper AM.

    Assembling a crate LS7

  • disco666 06 Aug 2013

    collateral said:
    Hrm.

    I was under the impression that you could still buy one with 3 pedals if you wanted to, so will this spell the end of the manual Aston Martin?
    And the end of normally aspirated engines.

    I am surprised this is being met with such enthusiasm on here.

    I guess it is better than many of the possible alternatives but I cannot rejoice in this news.

  • DonkeyApple 29 Jul 2013

    robinessex said:
    When I think off all the relativly small number of race engines made by various companies in the world, I can't believe that an engine couldn't be developed for Aston at an economic cost. The infernal combustion engine is rocket science these days, the knowledge already exists in these companies.
    Aston could easily build their own compliant engine and maintain it. Their real problem is that they have no real profit margin on their cars in contrast to the competition and so buying in the tech in exchange for equity means it is not only cheaper but appeases the lenders more easily.

    Their business structure is a classic debt leverage for a fast buck model and in the current market it makes them very weak and frail. The other problem is that the kind of shareholders and directors who opt for that model are also the type who want to suck out as much cash as they can for themselves.

    You can see this impact on many of the leveraged firms that have been folding since 2006. Fantastic products and firm but running a business model that is almost impossible to maintain.

  • robinessex 29 Jul 2013

    When I think off all the relativly small number of race engines made by various companies in the world, I can't believe that an engine couldn't be developed for Aston at an economic cost. The infernal combustion engine is rocket science these days, the knowledge already exists in these companies.

  • DonkeyApple 28 Jul 2013

    Zod said:
    Mercedes got a big shock from the total failure of Maybach. Because they can get more for their top end cars than Audi or BMW they thought they could just resurrect a forgotten brand and stick it on a stretched old model S Class with a luxurious (but too German) interior.

    With Rolls Royce and Bentley taken, what other English luxury brands are there?
    I think the error of the Maybach was the failure to appreciate that Germany pretty much executed anyone of heritage and class a long time ago and that they should have outsourced the interior to another country than do it inhouse.

    You only have to look at the interior of any luxury Gean car to see that they just don't quite get 'luxury' in the right way.

    I'm sure another issue is that no Chinaman ever grew up seeing important people in a Maybach.

    Oh, and the fact it just looked like another executive minicab from Mercedes.

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