770hp and 94mpg for Porsche 918 Spyder


Porsche is clearly on a single-manufacturer mission to make the hybrid cool.

Photos of 'half finished' mule have been released
Photos of 'half finished' mule have been released
Not only has it previously released an early 918 Spyder technology demonstrator looking like something Frankenstein would have created for Mad Max, it's now revealed the first full prototype images. And the car in question is finished in camouflage that pays homage to the 1970 Le Mans winning 917k.

What other carmaker could get away with that? What other carmaker would even think of that? And given the accompanying press release refers to "prototypes" with paint schemes "harking back to historical Porsche 917 racing cars", we can only assume the 05 represented here is more than just a random number.

Go on Porsche, tell us: is there a Steve McQueen-spec Gulf-camo 918 out there testing, too?

Gulf inspired disguise is a canny touch
Gulf inspired disguise is a canny touch
Aside from looking pretty, these new 918 pics confirm the car has entered the "trials" phase. As such, it seems Porsche has now settled for a mere 770hp from the 3.4-litre V8 and twin electric motor combination (up 52hp compared to the original 2010 Geneva concept...), and is still on track to achieve 94mpg.

The 918 is a plug-in hybrid, so the batteries can be pre-charged before you even turn a wheel, which ought to help marry these two seemingly incompatible performance parameters. In lab conditions, at least.

However, the Spyder also features a full carbon fibre reinforced plastic monocoque, "fully" adaptive aerodynamics, adaptive rear-axle steering and exhaust pipes that vent upwards in a banned-from-F1 stylee.

On sale next year - for real!
On sale next year - for real!
Weirdly, Porsche also says "the 918 Spyder is offering a glimpse of what Porsche Intelligent Performance may be capable of in the future." Which is either self-evident - as it's still a prototype - or just out of whack, as surely it's building this stuff now?

Anyhoo, semantics. Those of you lucky enough to have an outstanding order will no doubt be pleased to hear that development is entirely on schedule. Production is set to start in September 2013, and the first 918s should reach customers by the end of next year.

 

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Comments (118) Join the discussion on the forum

  • wtdoom 18 May 2012

    bobberz said:
    I just can't believe it'll achieve those figures. Looks great, though. Just like an updated Carrera GT. I wonder if the vertical exhaust will make production?

    Can't wait for the comparison tests between this, the "Enzo Mk2", and upcoming McLaren hypercar!
    Vertical exhausts are production .

  • kambites 18 May 2012

    And assuming the "e" means "equivalent cost to fuel", it's made meaningless here by the different levels of taxation. If it means equivalent CO2, it's likely to be even more arbitrary, since every different study into the CO2 emissions of electric cars comes up with a completely different result.

  • XitUp 18 May 2012

    Also, America don't use the same drive cycle as us in their tests.

  • bobberz 18 May 2012

    _g_ said:
    In the US they have 'mpg-e' or 'Miles per gallon gasoline equivalent' which electric vehicles have to have listed.

    Not sure how they work it out, however.

    The Ford Focus Electric is listed at 105mpge I believe. When you consider what a lot of lower power diesels are listed at and add in the probably worse depreciation from the batteries (or battery rental where you have to), suddenly it doesn't seem quite so amazing.

    Think the leaf is listed at 99mpge - when a (very carefully driven no doubt) Citroen AX diesel chas managed 100mpg, it doesn't seem that great considering how much you're paying.
    Keep in mind the U.S. gallon is smaller than the Imperial gallon, so a Polo Bluemotion that is rated at 72(?)Imperial MPG, would be ~60 in U.S MPG. I've never heard of any production petrol or diesel car that achieves anywhere near 100MPG, using either scale.

    Also, "MPG-e" is kind of a stop-gap rating that makes little sense. I'd expect the U.S. to adopt an entirely new or heavily revised system soon.


  • bobberz 18 May 2012

    I just can't believe it'll achieve those figures. Looks great, though. Just like an updated Carrera GT. I wonder if the vertical exhaust will make production?

    Can't wait for the comparison tests between this, the "Enzo Mk2", and upcoming McLaren hypercar!


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